Schedule

March 27, 2017
  • Politics, Culture & Society Brownbag. Madeleine Pape, Beyond the “Usual Suspects?” Reimagining Democracy with Participatory Budgeting in Chicago

    March 27, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    #8108 Sewell Social Science

    Madeleine Pape
    Title
    Beyond the “Usual Suspects?” Reimagining Democracy with Participatory Budgeting in Chicago
    Abstract
    This study examines whether innovations in the practice of democracy in the United States attract the participation of citizens who are typically underrepresented within existing political institutions. We focus on participatory budgeting, an increasingly popular intervention at the local government level that allows residents to decide how to allocate a particular pot of public money. Taking PB Chicago as our case study, we use three different approaches to examine who participated in different stages of the participatory budgeting process. We find that although residents who voted in PB Chicago were more often white, higher income earners, and highly educated relative to other residents in the relevant parts of the city, the PB Chicago voters with those characteristics were not more likely than others to participate in the other more demanding phases of the process. We extend the findings of our statistical analysis with interview data and find that outreach strategies were particularly important to shaping the character of active participants in PB Chicago. However, these gains were impeded by the mismatch between the budget being allocated and the priorities and interests of non-white and lower income residents. We conclude by considering the implications of our findings for the promises and challenges of participatory budgeting as a democratic intervention to advance social justice in the US context.

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April 3, 2017
  • Politics, Culture & Society Brownbag. Frank Lin.

    April 3, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    #8108 Sewell Social Science

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April 10, 2017
  • Politics, Culture & Society Brownbag. Emanuel Ubert.

    April 10, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    #8108 Sewell Social Science

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April 17, 2017
  • Politics, Culture & Society Brownbag. Paulina Garcia.

    April 17, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    #8108 Sewell Social Science

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April 24, 2017
  • Politics, Culture & Society Brownbag. Jee Jee Kim.

    April 24, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    #8108 Sewell Social Science

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May 1, 2017
  • Politics, Culture & Society Brownbag. Michael Roll

    May 1, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm
    #8108 Sewell Social Science

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September 11, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    September 11, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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September 18, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    September 18, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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September 25, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    September 25, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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October 2, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society. Michael McCarthy

    October 2, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

    Michael McCarthy
    Talk title: Dismantling Solidarity: Capitalist Politics and Retirement Income since the New Deal

    Why have capitalist markets come to play a growing role in the distribution of retirement income in the US since the New Deal? Drawing on rich archival data that covers more than fifty years of American history, this talk argues that the critical driver was policymakers’ reactions to capitalist crises and their political imperative to promote capitalist growth. Pension development has followed three paths of marketization in America since the New Deal, each distinct but converging: occupational pension plans were adopted as an alternative to real increases in Social Security benefits after World War II, private pension assets were then financialized and invested into the stock market, and, since the 1970s, traditional pension plans have come to be replaced with riskier 401(k) retirement plans. Comparing each episode of change, this talk will make two broad arguments: (1) structural mechanisms pushed policymakers to intervene to promote capitalist growth and avoid capitalist crises and (2) contingent historical factors in the balance of power between labor and business drove them to intervene in the particular ways they did and shaped how their interventions bore on the transformation of old-age income provisioning. By emphasizing the capitalist context in which policymaking occurs, I will turn our attention to how the structural factors that constrain policy change are situated within the balance of class forces.
    This talk is based on McCarthy's book Dismantling Solidarity
    http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/soc/pcs/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/MAM-BOOK-FLYER.pdf

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October 9, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    October 9, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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October 16, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    October 16, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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October 23, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    October 23, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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October 30, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    October 30, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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November 6, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    November 6, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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November 13, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    November 13, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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November 20, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    November 20, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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November 27, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    November 27, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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December 4, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    December 4, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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December 11, 2017
  • Politics Culture & Society

    December 11, 2017 @ 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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