John Allen Logan

John Allen Logan

Classes:

Soc 360 Statistics for Sociologists I
Soc 360 Statistics for Sociologists I
Soc 361 Statistics for Sociologists II
Soc 361 Statistics for Sociologists II
Soc 361 Statistics for Sociologists II
Soc 362 Statistics for Sociologists III
Soc 365 Computing in Sociological Research
Soc 952 Mathematical and Statistical Applications in Sociology
Soc 952 Discrete/Limited Dependent Variables

Professor of Sociology
3452 Sewell Social Sciences
(608) 262-0995
Fax: (608) 262-8400
logan@ssc.wisc.edu
Alternate Webpage
Office Hours: W 11-12 and by appt. (F'17)

Curriculum Vitae

Selected Publications:
Logan, J., Hoff, P., and Newton, M. 2008. "Two-Sided Estimation of Mate Preferences for Similarities in Age, Education, and Religion," Journal of the American Statistical Association, 103(482): 559-569.

Logan, John Allen. 1998. "Estimating Two-Sided Logit Models." Sociological Methodology 28:139-173.

Logan, John Allen. 1996. "Opportunity and Choice in Socially Structured Labor Markets." American Journal of Sociology 102:114-160.

Departmental Areas of Interest:
Methods and Statistics
Social Stratification

Affiliations:
Sociology
Center for Demography and Ecology
Institute for Research on Poverty
Interdisciplinary Training Program in Education Sciences

Research Interest Statement:
Logan has completed development and testing of a new, two-sided probit method for estimating preferences of men and women for characteristics of marital partners when data consist only of the characteristics of married partners and single men and women. He published results with collaborators Hoff (Statistics, UW Madison) and Newton (University of Washington) in Journal of American Statistical Association (J.A. Logan, P.D. Hoff and M.A. Newton, “Two-Sided Estimation of Mate Preferences for Similarities in Age, Education, and Religion,” June, 2008. Vol. 103, no. 482: pp. 559-569). This new method allows for posterior predictive simulations of effects of changes in the characteristics of potential mates in the marriage market. It is expected to have application in employment and other two-sided matching problems in addition to marriage. Though the method requires fewer assumptions than competing approaches, it is computationally demanding and is not expected to be widely used in its current form