school

school

Bucky_board_MHockey06_1705

bucky badger

Being a college student at UW-Madison definitely plays into my culture. In the fall, every Saturday morning I wake up early, put on as much red clothing as I can and walk over to Camp Randall only to sit on the cold concrete in 30-40 degree weather, for three hours before they will let me into the stadium. A big part of the UW-Madison student culture is going out and drinking. Although I consider being a student here as a huge part of my culture, I do not take part in that aspect of it.
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Binge drinking and heavy drinking are very common in UW-Madison culture. I struggle with judging excessive alcohol use, for the sole purpose of getting drunk. I see this kind of behavior as destructive to oneself personally, as well at to relationships. While I know that some people are genetically predisposed towards problematic substance use, I am very uncomfortable in situations where people are imbibing large amounts of alcohol. This is my internal reaction. Externally, I am often hesitant to express my disapproval. Mainly, this is because I am afraid that people will make snap judgments about me if I express my differing views. I also find that expressing disapproval of another’s lifestyle choices causes wedges in relationships and often closes relational doors.

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The facet of my culture that is most difficult for me to share in public would have to be my education/intelligence level. It’s not exactly that it’s difficult to share, but I think I just don’t know how to share it properly. The fact that I attend UW-Madison and have been on the Dean’s List every semester is something that I’m very proud of, but I feel as though it’s difficult to illustrate this without sounding like I’m being arrogant. I’ve always worked extremely hard for my grades, but I feel as though I have to hide it because I don’t want other people to think I’m trying to act superior towards them. For example, when we get back an exam in class and one of my peers asks me how I did, I usually say I did worse than how I actually did, so that he or she doesn’t think I’m bragging. As I write about it now, it seems like a very trivial and superficial problem, but I always feel like I have to act that way, and I don’t know why.

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The facet of my culture that is most difficult for me to share in public would have to be my education/intelligence level. It’s not exactly that it’s difficult to share, but I think I just don’t know how to share it properly. The fact that I attend UW-Madison and have been on the Dean’s List every semester is something that I’m very proud of, but I feel as though it’s difficult to illustrate this without sounding like I’m being arrogant. I’ve always worked extremely hard for my grades, but I feel as though I have to hide it because I don’t want other people to think I’m trying to act superior towards them. For example, when we get back an exam in class and one of my peers asks me how I did, I usually say I did worse than how I actually did, so that he or she doesn’t think I’m bragging. As I write about it now, it seems like a very trivial and superficial problem, but I always feel like I have to act that way, and I don’t know why.

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I have a learning disability and this is something that I have been ashamed of sharing with others for most of my adult life. This is true for close friends as well as with people in general. The reason I am ashamed is because I am worried that if I told people they may look down on me and unfairly label me as being incompetent. This may be an irrational fear but it persists nonetheless.

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 During my school years in China, I have learnt the culture of traditional Chinese students to be hardworking, taking grades as the priority of life. Unlike American students, children in China learned to study hard. Parents and teachers always emphasize the importance of grades, and we do not have many opportunities to get exercise, to do activities, to cooperate with others within a group, to practice leadership. We have experienced through elementary school to be aggressive and worry about grades, to not challenge teachers, to follow whatever parents or teachers tell us to do, etc. Such experiences determine our personality and the ways we do things.

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