CDHA CAAR

April 13, 2020

CAAR – National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper – April 13, 2020

Filed under: Working Papers — Tags: , , — admin @ 5:23 pm

Links to an abstract are available. For full text availability check your organization’s library. “The Wealth Decumulation Behavior of the Retired Elderly in Italy: The Importance of Bequest Motives and Precautionary Saving,” by Luigi Ventura and Charles Yuji Horioka (w26986, April 2020, .pdf format, 36p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w26986

January 9, 2020

CAAR – National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers – January 9, 2020

Links to an abstract are available. For full text availability check your organization’s library.

A. “Age Discrimination in Hiring: Evidence from Age-Blind vs. Non-Age-Blind Hiring Procedures,” by David Neumark (w26623, January 2020, .pdf format, 26p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w26623

B. “The Impact of Bequest Motives on Retirement Behavior in Japan: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis,” by Charles Yuji Horioka, Emin Gahramanov, Aziz Hayat, and Xueli Tang (w26621, January 2020, .pdf format, 40p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w26621

C. “Contract Work at Older Ages,” by Katharine G. Abraham, Brad Hershbein, and Susan Houseman (w26612, January 2020, .pdf format, 34p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w26612

D. “Does the Marginal Hospitalization Save Lives? The Case of Respiratory Admissions for the Elderly,” by Janet Currie and David Slusky (w26618, January 2020, .pdf format, 55p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w26618

October 3, 2016

CAAR – National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper – October 3, 2016

Filed under: Working Papers — Tags: , , , , — admin @ 5:00 pm

Links to an abstract are available. For full text availability check your organization’s library.

A. “Teaching, Teachers Pensions and Retirement across Recent Cohorts of College Graduate Women,” by Maria D. Fitzpatrick (w22698, September 2016, .pdf format, 32p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w22698

B. “Economic Conditions and Mortality: Evidence from 200 Years of Data,” by David M. Cutler, Wei Huang, and Adriana Lleras-Muney (w22690, September 2016, .pdf format, 50p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w22690

C. “The Impact of Medical Marijuana Laws on the Labor Supply and Health of Older Adults: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study,” by Lauren Hersch Nicholas and Johanna Catherine Maclean (w22688, September 2016, .pdf format, 39p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w22688

D. “The Impact of Intergenerational Transfers on Household Wealth Inequality in Japan and the United States,” by Yoko Niimi and Charles Yuji Horioka (w22687, September 2016, .pdf format, 30p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w22687

E. “Do Savings Increase in Response to Salient Information about Retirement and Expected Pensions?” by Mathias Dolls, Philipp Doerrenberg, Andreas Peichl, and Holger Stichnoth (w22684, September 2016, .pdf format, 42p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w22684

January 19, 2016

CAAR – National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers – January 19, 2016

Filed under: Working Papers — Tags: , , , — admin @ 4:59 pm

Links to an abstract are available. For full text availability check your organization’s library.

A. “Forecasting Trends in Disability in a Super-Aging Society: Adapting the Future Elderly Model to Japan,” by Brian K. Chen, Hawre Jalal, Hideki Hashimoto, Sze-Chuan Suen, Karen Eggleston, Michael Hurley, Lena Schoemaker, and Jay Bhattacharya (w21870, January 2016, .pdf format, 53p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w21870

B. “Rich, Poor, Singles, and Couples. Who Receives Medicaid in Old Age and Why?” by Margherita Borella, Mariacristina De Nardi, and Eric French (w21873, January 2016, .pdf format, 49p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w21873

C. “The Role of Bequests in Shaping Wealth Inequality: Evidence from Danish Wealth Records,” by Simon H. Boserup, Wojciech Kopczuk, and Claus T. Kreiner (w21896, January 2016, .pdf format, 16p.).

www.nber.org/papers/w21896

November 2, 2015

CAAR – National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper – November 2, 2015

Filed under: Working Papers — Tags: , — admin @ 4:54 pm

Links to an abstract are available. For full text availability check your organization’s library.

A. “What Determines End-of-Life Assets? A Retrospective View,” by James Poterba, Steven Venti, and David A. Wise (w21682, October 2015, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

We consider assets when individuals were last observed prior to death in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) and trace assets backwards to the age when these individuals were first observed. For most individuals, assets in the last year observed (LYO) were very similar to assets in the first year observed (FYO). In particular, most of those who were last observed with very low asset levels also had low assets when first observed. We also estimate the relationship between an individual’s asset change between the first and last date of observation, that individual’s education and health status when first observed, and that individual’s within-sample changes in health and family composition. We obtain estimates for HRS respondents who were 51 to 61 in 1992 and for AHEAD respondents who were age 70 and over in 1993.

papers.nber.org/papers/w21682

B. “Unequal Bequests,” by Marco Francesconi, Robert A. Pollak, and Domenico Tabasso (w21692, October 2015, .pdf format, 57p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), we make two contributions to the literature on end-of-life transfers. First, we show that unequal bequests are much more common than generally recognized, with one-third of parents with wills planning to divide their estates unequally among their children. These plans for unequal division are particularly concentrated in complex families, which are of two types: families with stepchildren and families with genetic children with whom the parent has had no contact, e.g., children from previous marriages. We find that in complex families past and current contact between parents and children reduces or eliminates unequal bequests. Second, although the literature focuses on the bequest intentions of parents who have made wills, we find that many older Americans have not made wills. Although the probability of having a will increases with age, 30 percent of HRS respondents aged 70 and over have no wills. Of HRS respondents who died between 1995 and 2010, 38 percent died without wills. Thus, focusing exclusively on the bequest intentions of parents who have made wills may provide an incomplete and misleading picture of end-of-life transfers.

papers.nber.org/papers/w21692

December 15, 2014

CAAR – University of Michigan Retirement Research Center Working Papers – December 15, 2014

A. “The Implications of Differential Trends in Mortality for Social Security Policy,” by John Bound, Arline Geronimus, Javier Rodriguez and Timothy A. Waidmann (WP 2014-314, October 2014, .pdf format, 23p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/index_abstract.cfm?ptid=1&pid=1006

B. “Responses of Time-use to Shocks in Wealth during the Great Recession,” by Jim Been, Michael Hurd and Susann Rohwedder (WP 2014-313, October 2014, .pdf format, 39p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/index_abstract.cfm?ptid=1&pid=1005

C. “Long-Run Determinants of Intergenerational Transfers,” by John Karl Scholz, Ananth Seshadri and Kamil Sicinski (WP 2014-312, September 2014, .pdf format, 23p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/index_abstract.cfm?ptid=1&pid=1004

D. “Does Protecting Older Workers from Discrimination Make It Harder to Get Hired?” by David Neumark, Joanne Song and Patrick Button (WP 2014-311, September 2014, .pdf format, 44p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/index_abstract.cfm?ptid=1&pid=1003

E. “Does Retirement Make you Happy? A Simultaneous Equations Approach,” by Raquel Fonseca, Arie Kapteyn, Jinkook Lee and Gema Zamarro (WP 2014-310, September 2014, .pdf format, 30p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/index_abstract.cfm?ptid=1&pid=1002

F. “The Insurance Role of Household Labor Supply for Older Workers,” by Yanan Li and Victoria Prowse (WP 2014-309, September 2014, .pdf format, 22p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/index_abstract.cfm?ptid=1&pid=1001

G. “Will They Take the Money and Work? An Empirical Analysis of People’s Willingness to Delay Claiming Social Security Benefits for a Lump Sum,” by Raimond H. Maurer, Olivia S. Mitchell, Ralph Rogalla and Tatjana Schimetschek (WP 2014-308, September 2014, .pdf format, 36p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/index_abstract.cfm?ptid=1&pid=1000

 

May 27, 2014

CAAR – National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper – May 27, 2014

Filed under: Reports and Articles — Tags: , — admin @ 1:00 pm

“Are Americans and Indians More Altruistic than the Japanese and Chinese? Evidence from a New International Survey of Bequest Plans,” by Charles Yuji Horioka (w20158, May 2014, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

This paper discusses three alternative assumptions concerning household preferences (altruism, self- interest, and a desire for dynasty building) and shows that these assumptions have very different implications for bequest motives and bequest division. After reviewing some of the literature on actual bequests, bequest motives, and bequest division, the paper presents data on the strength of bequest motives, stated bequest motives, and bequest division plans from a new international survey conducted in China, India, Japan, and the United States. It finds striking inter-country differences in bequest plans, with the bequest plans of Americans and Indians appearing to be much more consistent with altruistic preferences than those of the Japanese and Chinese and the bequest plans of the Japanese and Chinese appearing to be much more consistent with selfish preferences than those of Americans and Indians. These findings have important implications for the efficacy and desirability of stimulative fiscal policies, public pensions, and inheritance taxes.

www.nber.org/papers/w20158

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