Books

Quick List of all books

Recent Books by Current Faculty and Students

Forthcoming Books

Recent Books from PhD dissertations


Recent Books by Current Faculty and Students

An American Family in Amin's Uganda
Bert Adams (Old Africa Books, 2013)

"When Bert and Diane Adams moved to Uganda in 1970 they had no idea that a few months later General Idi Amin would overthrow the government in a coup and rule Uganda with great force in the coming years. In this book, Bert Adams, a sociology professor from the United States, tells his family's story of their time in Uganda at the beginning of the Amin era. Bert's assignment was to teach sociology at the prestigious Makerere University. With a down-to earth writing style and a keen eye for observation, Bert has captured Uganda as it was in the early 1970s as his family met and fell in love with the Ugandan people and then traveled around the country in their old Volkswagen bus. An American Family in Amin's Uganda gives an inside view of one family's attempt to live a normal life - teaching, singing, making friends, putting on dramatic productions, sight-seeing - in a country that was beginning to unravel under Amin's increasingly erratic and brutal rule of terror." -- Old Africa Books


Both Hands Tied: Welfare Reform and the Race to the Bottom in the Low-Wage Labor
Jane Collins and Victoria Mayer, Ph.D. '07 (University of Chicago Press, 2010)

"Both Hands Tied studies the working poor in the United States, focusing in particular on the relation between welfare and low-wage earnings among working mothers. Grounded in the experience of thirty-three women living in Milwaukee and Racine, Wisconsin, it tells the story of their struggle to balance child care and wage-earning in poorly paying and often state-funded jobs with inflexible schedules—and the moments when these jobs failed them and they turned to the state for additional aid." -- University of Chicago Press


Between Law and Diplomacy: The Social Contexts of Disputing at the World Trade Organization
Joseph A. Conti (Stanford University Press, 2011)

"Between Law and Diplomacy crafts an insider's look at international trade disputes at one of the most important institutions in the global economy—the World Trade Organization. The WTO regulates the global rules for trade, and—unique among international organizations—it provides a legalized process for litigation between countries over trade grievances.

Drawing on interviews with trade lawyers, ambassadors, trade delegations, and trade jurists, this book details how trade has become increasingly legalized and the implications of that for power relations between rich and poor countries. Joseph Conti looks closely at who uses the system to initiate and pursue disputes, who settles and on what terms, and the relative disconnect between pursuing a dispute and what a country gains through efforts to gain compliance with WTO dictates. Through this inside look at the process of disputing, Conti provides fresh perspective on how and why the law authorizes the use of specific resources and tactics in the ever unfolding struggle for control in the global economy." -- Stanford University Press


Social Psychology, 7th Edition
John D. DeLamater and Daniel J. Myers (Cengage Learning, 2011)

"This social psychology text, written by well-known sociologists, covers such topics as socialization, self, attitudes, communication, social influence, interpersonal attraction and relationships, behavior in small groups, life course, and personality and social structure. As students move through the text, they will explore answers to a wide variety of questions, such as: What decides who someone will fall in love with? Where do aggressive, violent, and criminal behaviors come from? Why are some people more charitable than others? Why do some people obey authority and conform while others always have to buck the trend? Why are some people lazier when they work in groups? What is the source of people’s stereotypes and prejudices? What causes conflict between groups? And finally, what makes us who we are?" –- Cengage Learning


Understanding Human Sexuality, 12th Edition
Janet Hyde and John DeLamater (McGraw Hill Higher Education, 2014)

"This trusted text examines the biological, psychological, and sociological perspectives of human sexuality and provides practical information needed for everyday living, all with a firm grounding in research. The thoroughly revised twelfth edition of Hyde, Understanding Human Sexuality, features a new emphasis on critical thinking skill development, with input from expert Diane Halpern to ensure clarity and accessibility for students. The author team features a unique combination of a psychologist and a sociologist, which gives this text a distinct interdisciplinary perspective.

New to this edition is Connect Human Sexuality, with the groundbreaking adaptive learning diagnostic, LearnSmart and assignable and assessable videos." -- McGraw Hill


Sex for Life: From Virginity to Viagra, How Sexuality Changes Throughout Our Lives
Laura M. Carpenter and John DeLamater (NYU Press, 2012)

"Sexual beliefs, behaviors and identities are interwoven throughout our lives, from childhood to old age. An edited collection of original empirical contributions united through its use of a distinctive, cutting-edge theoretical framework, Sex for Life critically examines sexuality across the entire lifespan. Rooted in diverse disciplines and employing a wide range of research methods, the chapters explore the sexual and social transitions that typically map to broad life stages, as well as key age-graded physiological transitions, such as puberty and menopause, while drawing on the latest developments in gender, sexuality, and life course studies.

Sex for Life explores a wide variety of topics, including puberty, sexual initiation, coming out, sexual assault, marriage/life partnering, disability onset, immigration, divorce, menopause, and widowhood, always attending to the social locations – including gender, race, ethnicity, and social class – that shape, and are shaped by, sexuality. The empirical work collected in Sex for Life ultimately speaks to important public policy issues, such as sex education, aging societies, and the increasing politicization of scientific research. Accessibly written, the contributions capture the interplay between individual lives and the ever-changing social-historical context, facilitating new insight not only into people's sexual lives, but also into ways of studying them, ultimately providing a fresh, new perspective on sexuality." -- NYU Press


Handbook of Social Psychology
John DeLamater and Amanda Ward (Springer, 2013)

"This handbook provides a broad overview of the field of social psychology and up-to-date coverage of current social psychological topics. It reflects the recent and substantial development of the field, both with regard to theory and empirical research. It starts out by covering major theoretical perspectives, including the interactionist, identity, social exchange, social structure and the person perspectives. Next, it discusses development and socialization in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. In addition to updated discussions of topics that were included in the first edition, the part examining personal processes includes entirely new topics, such as social psychology and the body and individual agency and social motivation. Interpersonal processes are discussed from a contemporary perspective with a focus on stress and health. The final section examines the person in sociocultural context, and includes another topic new to the second edition, the social psychology of race and gender and intersectionality." -- Springer


Social Psychology, 8th edition
John D. DeLamater, Daniel Myers, and Jessica Collett (Westview Press, 2015)

"Written by well-known sociologists John D. DeLamater, Daniel J. Myers, and Jessica L. Collett, this fully revised and updated edition of Social Psychology is a highly accessible and engaging exploration of the question “what is it that makes us who we are?” Grounded in the latest contemporary research, the book also explains the methods in which social psychologists investigate human behavior in a social context and the theoretical perspectives that ground the discipline.

With hundreds of real-world examples, figures, tables, and photographs, the text explores such topics as self, attitudes, social influence, emotions, interpersonal attraction and relationships, collective behavior, and personality. Each chapter is designed to be a self-contained unit for ease of use in any classroom, beginning with focal questions that establish the issues being discussed and ending with a summary of key points, a list of key terms and concepts, and critical thinking questions." -- Westview Press


Racial Domination, Racial Progress: The Sociology of Race in America
Matthew Desmond, Ph.D. 2010 and Mustafa Emirbayer (McGraw Hill, 2009)

"Racial Domination, Racial Progress: The Sociology of Race in America looks at race in a clear and accessible way, allowing students to understand how racial domination and progress work in all aspects of society. Examining how race is not a matter of separate entities but of systems of social relations, this text unpacks how race works in the political, economic, residential, legal, educational, aesthetic, associational, and intimate fields of social life. Racial Domination, Racial Progress is a work of uncompromising intersectionality, which refuses to artificially separate race and ethnicity from class and gender, while, at the same time, never losing sight of race as its primary focus. The authors seek to connect with their readers in a way that combines disciplined reasoning with a sense of engagement and passion, conveying sophisticated ideas in a clear and compelling fashion." –- McGraw Hill


Pour une microhistoire de la Shoah [Micro-history of the Holocaust]
Claire Zalc, Tal Bruttmann, Ivan Ermakoff and Nicolas Mariot (Seuil, 2012)

"L'observation de la destruction des Juifs d'Europe à la loupe permet de renouveler l'histoire de la Shoah. Cette démarche micro-historienne structure l'ensemble du volume. Le déplacement des échelles d'observation confirme que la richesse d'une source d'archive dépend du cadre d'analyse déployé afin de l'interroger. En outre, le changement d'échelle éclaire d'un jour nouveau la place du « moi » dans sa relation avec l’écriture historienne.

Mais quid des inévitables questionnements moraux et éthiques que soulève une telle analyse lorsque l'attention se porte sur les rapports entre victimes, exécutants, décideurs et témoins ? En effet, certaines analyses ne se placent plus du côté des bourreaux ou des victimes, mais abordent frontalement les relations entre victimes et exécutants, entre exécutants à différents niveaux de responsabilité, et témoins, et entre membres des groupes ciblés par la persécution.

Un ouvrage qui répond au souci de ne pas prendre tels quels les découpages hérités de l'historiographie. Pour la renouveler." -- Editions du Seuil


Varieties of Feminism: German Gender Politics in Global Perspective
Myra Marx Ferree (Stanford University Press, 2012)

"Varieties of Feminism investigates the development of German feminism by contrasting it with women's movements that arise in countries, like the United States, committed to liberalism. With both conservative Christian and social democratic principles framing the feminist discourses and movement goals, which in turn shape public policy gains, Germany provides a tantalizing case study of gender politics done differently.

The German feminist trajectory reflects new political opportunities created first by national reunification and later, by European Union integration, as well as by historically established assumptions about social justice, family values, and state responsibility for the common good. Tracing the opportunities, constraints, and conflicts generated by using class struggle as the framework for gender mobilization—juxtaposing this with the liberal tradition where gender and race are more typically framed as similar—Ferree reveals how German feminists developed strategies and movement priorities quite different from those in the United States." -- Stanford University Press


Gender, Violence and Human Security: Critical Feminist Perspectives
Myra Marx Ferree (NYU Press, 2013)

"The nature of human security is changing globally: interstate conflict and even intrastate conflict may be diminishing worldwide, yet threats to individuals and communities persist. Large-scale violence by formal and informal armed forces intersects with interpersonal and domestic forms of violence in mutually reinforcing ways. Gender, Violence, and Human Security takes a critical look at notions of human security and violence through a feminist lens, drawing on both theoretical perspectives and empirical examinations through case studies from a variety of contexts around the globe.

This fascinating volume goes beyond existing feminist international relations engagements with security studies to identify not only limitations of the human security approach, but also possible synergies between feminist and human security approaches. Noted scholars Aili Mari Tripp, Myra Marx Ferree, and Christina Ewig, along with their distinguished group of contributors, analyze specific case studies from around the globe, ranging from post-conflict security in Croatia to the relationship between state policy and gender-based crime in the United States. Shifting the focus of the term "human security" from its defensive emphasis to a more proactive notion of peace, the book ultimately calls for addressing the structural issues that give rise to violence. A hard-hitting critique of the ways in which global inequalities are often overlooked by human security theorists, Gender, Violence, and Human Security presents a much-needed intervention into the study of power relations throughout the world." -- NYU Press


On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City
Alice Goffman (University of Chicago Press, 2014)

"Forty years in, the War on Drugs has done almost nothing to prevent drugs from being sold or used, but it has nonetheless created a little-known surveillance state in America's most disadvantaged neighborhoods. Arrest quotas and high-tech surveillance techniques criminalize entire blocks, and transform the very associations that should stabilize young lives—family, relationships, jobs—into liabilities, as the police use such relationships to track down suspects, demand information, and threaten consequences.

Alice Goffman spent six years living in one such neighborhood in Philadelphia, and her close observations and often harrowing stories reveal the pernicious effects of this pervasive policing. Goffman introduces us to an unforgettable cast of young African American men who are caught up in this web of warrants and surveillance—some of them small-time drug dealers, others just ordinary guys dealing with limited choices. All find the web of presumed criminality, built as it is on the very associations and friendships that make up a life, nearly impossible to escape. We watch as the pleasures of summer-evening stoop-sitting are shattered by the arrival of a carful of cops looking to serve a warrant; we watch—and can’t help but be shocked—as teenagers teach their younger siblings and cousins how to run from the police (and, crucially, to keep away from friends and family so they can stay hidden); and we see, over and over, the relentless toll that the presumption of criminality takes on families—and futures.

While not denying the problems of the drug trade, and the violence that often accompanies it, through her gripping accounts of daily life in the forgotten neighborhoods of America's cities, Goffman makes it impossible for us to ignore the very real human costs of our failed response—the blighting of entire neighborhoods, and the needless sacrifice of whole generations." -- University of Chicago Press


Controversies in Science & Technology, Volume 4: From Sustainability to Surveillance
Daniel Kleinman, Karen A. Cloud-Hansen and Jo Handelsman (Oxford University Press, 2014)

"When it comes to any current scientific debate, there are more than two sides to every story. Controversies in Science and Technology, Volume 4 analyzes controversial topics in science and technology-infrastructure, ecosystem management, food security, and plastics and health-from multiple points of view. The editors have compiled thought-provoking essays from a variety of experts from academia and beyond, creating a volume that addresses many of the issues surrounding these scientific debates. Part I of the volume discusses infrastructure, and the real meaning behind the term in today's society. Essays address the central issues that motivate current discussion about infrastructure, including writing on the vulnerability to disasters. Part II, titled "Food Policy," will focus on the challenges of feeding an ever-growing world and the costs of not doing so. Part III features essays on chemicals and environmental health, and works to define "safety" as it relates to today's scientific community. The book's final section examines ecosystem management. In the end, Kleinman, Cloud-Hansen, and Handelsman provide a multifaceted volume that will be appropriate for anyone hoping to understand arguments surrounding several of today's most important scientific controversies." -- Oxford University Press


Routledge Handbook of Science, Technology, and Society
Daniel Lee Kleinman and Kelly Moore (editors) (Routledge, 2014)

"Over the last decade or so, the field of science and technology studies (STS) has become an intellectually dynamic interdisciplinary arena. Concepts, methods, and theoretical perspectives are being drawn both from long-established and relatively young disciplines. From its origins in philosophical and political debates about the creation and use of scientific knowledge, STS has become a wide and deep space for the consideration of the place of science and technology in the world, past and present. The Routledge Handbook of Science, Technology and Society seeks to capture the dynamism and breadth of the field by presenting work that pushes the reader to think about science and technology and their intersections with social life in new ways." -- Routledge


The Logic of Fragmentation: An Ecological Analysis of the Chinese Legal Services Market (in Chinese)
Sida Liu (Shanghai Joint Publishing Co., 2011)

"This book is based on my 7-year Ph.D. research at the University of Chicago and I believe it is by far the most comprehensive study on the Chinese legal services market during the three decades of China's legal reform (1979-2009). The research includes more than 250 interviews with law practitioners and government officials in 12 provinces of China during 2004-2007, as well as online ethnography and archival research." -- Sida Liu


The Politics of Public Sector Performance: Pockets of Effectiveness in Developing Countries
Michael Roll (editor) (Routledge, 2013)

"It is widely believed that the state in developing countries is weak. The public sector, in particular, is often regarded as corrupt and dysfunctional. This book provides an urgently needed corrective to such overgeneralized notions of bad governance in the developing world. It examines the variation in state capacity by looking at a particularly paradoxical and frequently overlooked phenomenon: effective public organizations or 'pockets of effectiveness' in developing countries.

Why do these pockets exist? How do they emerge and survive in hostile environments? And do they have the potential to trigger more comprehensive reforms and state-building? This book provides surprising answers to these questions, based on detailed case studies of exceptional public organizations and state-owned enterprises in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America and the Middle East. The case studies are guided by a common analytical framework that is process-oriented and sensitive to the role of politics. The concluding comparative analysis develops a novel explanation for why some public organizations in the developing world beat the odds and turn into pockets of public sector performance and service delivery while most do not.

This book will be of strong interest to students and scholars of political science, sociology, development, organizations, public administration, public policy and management." -- Routledge


Beyond the Boycott: Labor Rights, Human Rights and Transnational Activism
Gay Seidman (Russell Sage, 2009)

"As the world economy becomes increasingly integrated, companies can shift production to wherever wages are lowest and unions weakest. How can workers defend their rights in an era of mobile capital? With national governments forced to compete for foreign investment by rolling back legal protections for workers, fair trade advocates are enlisting consumers to put market pressure on companies to treat their workers fairly. In Beyond the Boycott, sociologist Gay Seidman asks whether this non-governmental approach can reverse the "race to the bottom" in global labor standards." –- Russell Sage Foundation


The Sociology of Harry Potter: 22 Enchanting Essays on the Wizarding World
Jenn Sims (ed.) (Zossima Press, 2012)

"Philosophers and psychologists have explored the Harry Potter stories through the lenses of their disciplines, now it's time for sociologists. In the twenty-two chapters of The Sociology of Harry Potter, social scientists from eight countries cast their imaginations on the wizarding world. From standard topics such as inequality and identity to more contemporary topics such as technology and trauma memory, this essay collection analyzes, not J. K. Rowling's books as fiction, but her wizarding world as a "real" society. The Hogwarts house system, Quidditch, internet fan fiction and the lives of our favorite witches and wizards are explored in reference to sociological theories and concepts. Fans of these bestselling books will gain insights into the world of Harry Potter as well as sociology. Sociologists and their students will be intrigued to see everyday tools of the trade working magic in another universe." -- Zossima Press


Gender Equality: Transforming Family Divisions of Labor
Janet C. Gornick and Marcia K. Meyers. Volume 6 in The Real Utopias Project, Erik Olin Wright (series editor) (Verso Books, 2009)

"In the labor market and workplace, anti-discrimination rules, affirmative action policies, and pay equity procedures exercise a direct effect on gender relations. But what can be done to influence the ways that men and women allocate tasks and responsibilities at home? In Gender Equality, Volume VI in the Real Utopias series, social scientists Janet C. Gornick and Marcia K. Meyers propose a set of policies—paid family leave provisions, working time regulations, and early childhood education and care—designed to foster more egalitarian family divisions of labor by strengthening men's ties at home and women’s attachment to paid work." -– Verso Books


Envisioning Real Utopias
Erik Olin Wright. Volume 7 in The Real Utopias Project, Erik Olin Wright (series editor) (Verso Books, 2010)

"Erik Olin Wright's Envisioning Real Utopias is a comprehensive assault on the quietism of contemporary social theory. Building on a lifetime's work analyzing the class system in the developed world, as well as exploring the problem of the transition to a socialist alternative, Wright has now completed a systematic reconstruction of the core values and feasible goals for Left theorists and political actors." –- Verso Books


American Society: How it Really Works
Erik Olin Wright and Joel Rogers (W.W. Norton, 2010)

"In American Society: How It Really Works, Erik Olin Wright and Joel Rogers ask several crucial questions: What kind of society is American society? How does it really work? Why is it the way it is? In what ways does it need changing, and how can those changes be brought about?

They explore the implications of these questions by examining five key values that most Americans believe our society should realize: Freedom, Prosperity, Efficiency, Fairness, and Democracy. Wright and Rogers ask readers to evaluate to what degree contemporary American society realizes these values and suggest how Americans might solve some of the social problems that confront America today." -- W.W. Norton


Forthcoming Books

An Invitation to Qualitative Fieldwork: Context is Everything
Jason Orne and Michael M. Bell (Routledge, forthcoming 2015)

In an attempt to cope with the profusion of tools and techniques for qualitative methods, texts for students have tended to respond in the following two ways: "how to" or "why to." In contrast, this book takes on both tasks to give students a more complete picture of the field. An Invitation to Qualitative Fieldwork is a helpful guide, a compendium of tips, and a workbook for skills. Whether for a class, as a reference book, or something to return to before, during, and after data-collection, An Invitation to Qualitative Fieldwork is a new kind of qualitative handbook.

The Racial Order
Mustafa Emirbayer and Matthew Desmond (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming.)

Planning Democracy: Agrarian Intellectuals and the Intended New Deal
Jess Gilbert (Yale University Press, forthcoming 2015)

New Monasticism and the Transformation of American Evangelicalism
Wes Markofski (Oxford University Press, forthcoming)


Recent Books from UW dissertations and theses

Some former Wisconsin graduate students have transformed their master's thesis or dissertation work into published books. We're proud that their work here will be seen by a wider audience.

From Servants to Workers: South African Domestic Workers and the Democratic State
Shireen Ally, Ph.D. 2007 (Cornell University Press, 2009)

"In the past decade, hundreds of thousands of women from poorer countries have braved treacherous journeys to richer countries to work as poorly paid domestic workers. Scholars and activists denounce compromised forms of citizenship that expose these women to at times shocking exploitation and abuse.

In From Servants to Workers, Shireen Ally asks whether the low wages and poor working conditions so characteristic of migrant domestic work can truly be resolved by means of the extension of citizenship rights. Following South Africa's "miraculous" transition to democracy, more than a million poor black women who had endured a despotic organization of paid domestic work under apartheid became the beneficiaries of one of the world's most impressive and extensive efforts to formalize and modernize paid domestic work through state regulation. Instead of undergoing a dramatic transformation, servitude relations stubbornly resisted change. Ally locates an explanation for this in the tension between the forms of power deployed by the state in its efforts to protect workers, on the one hand, and the forms of power workers recover through the intimate nature of their work, on the other.

Listening attentively to workers' own narrations of their entry into democratic citizenship-rights, Ally explores the political implications of paid domestic work as an intimate form of labor. From Servants to Workers integrates sociological insights with the often-heartbreaking life histories of female domestic workers in South Africa and provides rich detail of the streets, homes, and churches of Johannesburg where these women work, live, and socialize." -- Cornell University Press


On the Fireline: Living and Dying with Wildland Firefighters
Matthew Desmond, Ph.D. 2010 (University of Chicago Press, 2007)

"In this rugged account of a rugged profession, Matthew Desmond explores the heart and soul of the wildland firefighter. Having joined a firecrew in Northern Arizona as a young man, Desmond relates his experiences with intimate knowledge and native ease, adroitly balancing emotion with analysis and action with insight. On the Fireline shows that these firefighters aren't the adrenaline junkies or romantic heroes as they're so often portrayed." -– University of Chicago Press


The Temp Economy: From Kelly Girls to Permatemps in Postwar America
Erin Hatton, Ph.D. 2007 (Temple University Press, 2011)

"Everyone knows that work in America is not what it used to be. Layoffs, outsourcing, contingent work, disappearing career ladders—these are the new workplace realities for an increasing number of people. But why? In The Temp Economy, Erin Hatton takes one of the best-known icons of the new economy—the temp industry—and finds that it is more than just a symbol of this degradation of work. The temp industry itself played an active role in this decline—and not just for temps. Industry leaders started by inventing the "Kelly Girl," exploiting 1950s gender stereotypes to justify low wages, minimal benefits, and chronic job insecurity. But they did not stop with Kelly Girls. From selling human "business machines" in the 1970s to "permatemps" in the 1990s, the temp industry relentlessly portrayed workers as profit-busting liabilities that hurt companies' bottom lines even in boom times. These campaigns not only legitimized the widespread use of temps, they also laid the cultural groundwork for a new corporate ethos of ruthless cost cutting and mass layoffs.

Succinct, highly readable, and drawn from a vast historical record of industry documents, The Temp Economy is a one-stop resource for anyone interested in the temp industry or the degradation of work in postwar America." -- Temple University Press


Hidden Hunger: Gender and the Politics of Smarter Foods
Aya Hirata Kumura, Ph.D. 2006 (Cornell University Press, 2013)

"For decades, NGOs targeting world hunger focused on ensuring that adequate quantities of food were being sent to those in need. In the 1990s, the international food policy community turned its focus to the "hidden hunger" of micronutrient deficiencies, a problem that resulted in two scientific solutions: fortification, the addition of nutrients to processed foods, and biofortification, the modification of crops to produce more nutritious yields. This hidden hunger was presented as a scientific problem to be solved by "experts" and scientifically engineered smart foods rather than through local knowledge, which was deemed unscientific and, hence, irrelevant.

In Hidden Hunger, Aya Hirata Kimura explores this recent emphasis on micronutrients and smart foods within the international development community and, in particular, how the voices of women were silenced despite their expertise in food purchasing and preparation. Kimura grounds her analysis in case studies of attempts to enrich and market three basic foods—rice, wheat flour, and baby food—in Indonesia. She shows the power of nutritionism and how its technical focus enhanced the power of corporations as a government partner while restricting public participation in the making of policy for public health and food. She also analyzes the role of advertising to promote fortified foodstuffs and traces the history of Golden Rice, a crop genetically engineered to alleviate vitamin A deficiencies. Situating the recent turn to smart food in Indonesia and elsewhere as part of a long history of technical attempts to solve the Third World food problem, Kimura deftly analyzes the intersection of scientific expertise, market forces, and gendered knowledge to illuminate how hidden hunger ultimately defined women as victims rather than as active agents." -- Cornell University Press


Market Justice: Political Economic Struggle in Bolivia
Brent Z. Kaup, Ph.D. 2009 (Cambridge University Press, 2012)

"Market Justice explores the challenges for the new global left as it seeks to construct alternative means of societal organization. Focusing on Bolivia, Brent Z. Kaup examines a testing ground of neoliberal and counter-neoliberal policies and an exemplar of bottom-up globalization. Kaup argues that radical shifts towards and away from free market economic trajectories are not merely shaped by battles between transnational actors and local populations, but also by conflicts between competing domestic elites and the ability of the oppressed to overcome traditional class divides. Further, the author asserts that struggles against free markets are not evidence of opposition to globalization or transnational corporations. They should instead be understood as struggles over the forms of global integration and who benefits from them." -- Cambridge University Press


Privilege: The Making of an Adolescent Elite at St. Paul's School
Shamus Rahman Khan, Ph.D. 2008 (Princeton University Press, 2010)

"In Privilege, Shamus Khan returns to his alma mater to provide an inside look at an institution that has been the private realm of the elite for the past 150 years. He shows that St. Paul's students continue to learn what they always have--how to embody privilege. Yet, while students once leveraged the trappings of upper-class entitlement, family connections, and high culture, current St. Paul's students learn to succeed in a more diverse environment. To be the future leaders of a more democratic world, they must be at ease with everything from highbrow art to everyday life--from Beowulf to Jaws--and view hierarchies as ladders to scale. Through deft portrayals of the relationships among students, faculty, and staff, Khan shows how members of the new elite face the opening of society while still preserving the advantages that allow them to rule." -- Princeton University Press


Seeds, Science, and Struggle: The Global Politics of Transgenic Crops
Abby Kinchy, Ph.D. 2000 (The MIT Press, 2012)

"Genetic engineering has a wide range of cultural, economic, and ethical implications, yet it has become almost an article of faith that regulatory decisions about biotechnology be based only on evidence of specific quantifiable risks; to consider anything else is said to "politicize" regulation. In this study of social protest against genetically engineered food, Abby Kinchy turns the conventional argument on its head. Rather than consider politicization of the regulatory system, she takes a close look at the scientization of public debate about the "contamination" of crops resulting from pollen drift and seed mixing. Advocates of alternative agriculture confront the scientization of this debate by calling on international experts, carrying out their own research, questioning regulatory science in court, building alternative markets, and demanding that their governments consider the social and economic impacts of the new technologies.

Kinchy focuses on social conflicts over canola in Canada and maize in Mexico, drawing out their linkages to the global food system and international environmental governance. The book ultimately demonstrates the shortcomings of dominant models of scientific risk governance, which marginalize alternative visions of rural livelihoods and sustainable food production." -- The MIT Press


Caring For Our Own: Why there is no Political Demand for New American Social Right
Sandra Levitsky, Ph.D. 2006 (Oxford University Press, 2014)

"Aging populations and dramatic changes in health care provision, household structure, and women's labor force participation over the last half century have created what many observers have dubbed a "crisis in care": demand for care of the old and infirm is rapidly growing, while the supply of private care within the family is substantially contracting. And yet, despite the well-documented adverse effects of contemporary care dilemmas on the economic security of families, the physical and mental health of family care providers, the bottom line of businesses, and the financial health of existing social welfare programs, American families have demonstrated little inclination for translating their private care problems into political demands for social policy reform. Caring for Our Own inverts an enduring question of social welfare politics. Rather than asking why the American state hasn't responded to unmet social welfare needs by expanding social entitlements, this book asks: Why don't American families view unmet social welfare needs as the basis for demands for new state entitlements? How do traditional beliefs in family responsibility for social welfare persist even in the face of well-documented unmet need? The answer, this book argues, lies in a better understanding of how individuals imagine solutions to the social welfare problems they confront and what prevents new understandings of social welfare provision from developing into political demand for alternative social arrangements. Caring for Our Own considers the powerful ways in which existing social policies shape the political imagination, reinforcing longstanding values about family responsibility, subverting grievances grounded in notions of social responsibility, and in some rare cases, constructing new models of social provision that would transcend existing ideological divisions in American social politics." -- Oxford University Press


Satanic Mills or Silicon Islands? The Politics of High-Tech Production in the Philippines
Steven McKay, Ph.D. 2000 (Cornell University Press, 2006)

"Satanic Mills or Silicon Islands? challenges the myth of globalization's homogenizing power, arguing that the uniqueness of place is becoming more, not less important. Steven McKay documents how multinational firms secure worker control and consent by reaching beyond the high-tech factory and into local labor markets. He also traces the rise of a new breed of privatized export processing zones, revealing the state's—in these cases, the Philippines—revamped role in the wider politics of global production. Finally, McKay gives voice to the women workers themselves, as they find meaning, identity, and agency on and beyond the "new" shop floor.

This book deftly weaves together three critical strands of global studies: Southeast Asia as a key site of global production, the organization of work in advanced electronics, and working-class conditions under globalization. Drawing on the author's rich analysis of four multinational electronics firms—from their boardrooms to boarding houses—Satanic Mills or Silicon Islands? makes a unique contribution to the study of work, labor, and high-tech production." -- Cornell University Press


Boystown
Jason Orne (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming 2015)


Working Construction: Why Working-class White Men Put Themselves—and the Labor Movement–in Harm’s Way
Kris Paap, Ph.D. 1999 (Cornell University Press, 2006)

"Kris Paap worked for nearly three years as a carpenter’s apprentice on a variety of job sites, closely observing her colleagues’ habits, expressions, and attitudes. As a woman in an overwhelmingly male—and stereotypically "macho"—profession, Paap uses her experiences to reveal the ways that gender, class, and race interact in the construction industry. She shows how the stereotypes of construction workers and their overt displays of sexism, racism, physical strength, and homophobia are not "just how they are," but rather culturally and structurally mandated enactments of what it means to be a man—and a worker—in America." –- Cornell University Press


Marked: Race, Crime, and Finding Work in an Era of Mass Incarceration
Devah Pager, Ph.D. 2002 (University of Chicago Press, 2007)

"The product of an innovative field experiment, Marked gives us our first real glimpse into the tremendous difficulties facing ex-offenders in the job market. Devah Pager matched up pairs of young men, randomly assigned them criminal records, then sent them on hundreds of real job searches throughout the city of Milwaukee. Her applicants were attractive, articulate, and capable—yet ex-offenders received less than half the callbacks of the equally qualified applicants without criminal backgrounds. Young black men, meanwhile, paid a particularly high price: those with clean records fared no better in their job searches than white men just out of prison. Such shocking barriers to legitimate work, Pager contends, are an important reason that many ex-prisoners soon find themselves back in the realm of poverty, underground employment, and crime that led them to prison in the first place." –- University of Chicago Press


We Are in This Dance Together: Gender, Power and Globalization at a Mexican Garment Firm
Nancy Plankey-Videla, Ph.D. 2004 (Rutgers University Press, 2012)

"Changes in the global economy have real and contradictory outcomes for the everyday lives of women workers. In 2001, Nancy Plankey-Videla had a rare opportunity to witness these effects firsthand. Having secured access to one of Latin America's top producers of high-end men's suits in Mexico for participant-observer research, she labored as a machine operator for nine months on a shop floor made up, mostly, of women. The firm had recently transformed itself from traditional assembly techniques, to lean, cutting-edge, Japanese-style production methods. Lured initially into the firm by way of increased wages and benefits, workers had helped shoulder the company's increasing debts. When the company's plan for successful expansion went awry and it reneged on promises it had made to the workforce, women workers responded by walking out on strike.

Building upon in-depth interviews with over sixty workers, managers, and policy makers, Plankey-Videla documents and analyzes events leading up to the female-led factory strike and its aftermath—including harassment from managers, corrupt union officials and labor authorities, and violent governor-sanctioned police actions. We Are in This Dance Together illustrates how the women's shared identity as workers and mothers—deserving of dignity, respect, and a living wage—became the basis for radicalization and led to further civic organizing against the state, the company, and the corrupt union to demand justice." -- Rutgers University Press


Global Rivalries: Standards Wars and the Transnational Cotton Trade
Amy A. Quark, Ph.D. 2009 (University of Chicago Press, 2013)

"As the economies of China, India, and other Asian nations continue to grow, these countries are seeking greater control over the rules that govern international trade. Setting the rules carries with it the power to establish advantage, so it's no surprise that everyone wants a seat at the table - or that negotiations over rules often result in stalemates at meeting of the World Trade Organization.

Nowhere is the conflict over rule setting more evident than in the simmering "standards wars" over the rules that define quality and enable the adjudication of disputes. In Global Rivalries, Amy A. Quark explores the questions of how rules are made, who makes them, and how they are enforced, using the lens of cotton—a simple commodity that has become a poignant symbol of both the crisis of Western rule making power and the potential for powerful new rivals to supplant it. Quark traces the strategies for influencing rule making processes employed not only by national governments but also by transnational corporations, fiber scientists, and trade associations from around the globe. Quark analyzes the efficacy of their approaches and the implications for more marginal actors in the cotton trade, including producers in West Africa.

By placing the current contest within the historical development of the global capitalist system, Global Rivalries highlights a fascinating interaction of politics and economics." -- University of Chicago Press


Crafting Collectivity: American Rainbow Gatherings and Alternative Forms of Community
Chelsea Schelly, Ph.D. 2013 (Paradigm Publishers, 2014)

"Every summer, thousands of people assemble to live together to celebrate the Annual Gathering of the Rainbow Family. Participants establish temporary systems of water distribution and filtration, sanitation, health care, and meals provided freely to all who gather, and they develop sharing and trading systems, recreational opportunities, and educational experiences distinct to this creative social world. The Rainbow Family has invented itself as a unique modern culture without formal organization, providing the necessities of life freely to all who attend. The Annual Gathering of the Rainbow Family has been operating for more than forty years as an experiment in liberty that demonstrates how material organization, participation, and cultural connection can reshape social relationships and transform individual lives. Grounded in sociological theory and research, the book considers what kind of culture the material systems of "Babylon" reinforce and how society could facilitate the kind of social world and human welfare humans desire." -- Paradigm Publishers


Mentoring At-Risk Students through the Hidden Curriculum of Higher Education
Buffy Smith, Ph.D. 2004 (Lexington Books, 2013)

"Mentoring At-Risk Students through the Hidden Curriculum of Higher Education reveals how the institutional culture and social networks of universities influence the academic success of underrepresented students. This book is based on a qualitative study that integrates a sociological and higher education theoretical framework to examine the impact of mentoring programs on students' acquisition of institutional cultural capital and social capital during their college experience.

This book offers an innovative mentoring model that illuminates how students can navigate the hidden curriculum of higher education. In addition, the book provides practical strategies on how to avoid academic mine fields in order to thrive in college. This book is written for administrators, faculty, student affairs professionals and students to promote retention, academic success, and create a more transparent, inclusive, and equitable higher education system." -- Lexington Books


America's Fight over Water: The Environmental and Political Effects of Large-Scale Water Systems
Kevin Wehr, Ph.D. 2002 (Routledge, 2004)

"This book inquires into the relations between society and its natural environment by examining the historical discourse around several cases of state building in the American West-the construction of three high dams from 1928 to 1963." -- Routledge


The Politics of Sexual Harassment: A Comparative Study of the United States, the European Union and Germany
Kathrin Zippel, Ph.D. 2000 (Cambridge University Press, 2006)

"Sexual harassment, in particular in the workplace, is a controversial topic which often makes headline news. What accounts for the cross-national variation in laws, employer policies, and implementation of policies dealing with sexual harassment in the workplace? Why was the United States on the forefront of policy and legal solutions, and how did this affect politicization of sexual harassment in the European Union and its member states? Exploring the way sexual harassment has become a global issue, Kathrin Zippel draws on theories of comparative feminist policy, gender and welfare state regimes, and social movements to explore the distinct paths that the United States, the European Union and its member states, specifically Germany, have embarked on to address the issue. This comparison provides invaluable insights on the role of transnational movements in combatting sexual harassment, and on future efforts to implement the European Union Directive of 2002." -– Cambridge University Press