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About the Center for Law, Society and Justice

The Center for Law, Society, and Justice is the institutional home of the Legal Studies Program and the Criminal Justice Certificate Program.

The faculty of the Center for Law, Society and Justice come from a wide variety of disciplines. Many faculty have a primary affiliation with a tenure granting unit such as Law, History, Political Science, or Sociology.

The Core Faculty teach a combination of disciplinary courses with a law focus and courses specifically designed to be interdisciplinary. Their teaching includes the gateway courses in the new Legal Studies curriculum (Legal Studies 131 and 217) and the Legal Studies capstone course (Legal Studies 641). Core Faculty members participate in curricular design and course development activities, set policies for students in the Center programs, and provide guidance to academic staff.

In addition to the Core Faculty, a number of Affiliated Faculty teach a variety of disciplinary courses that have a law or legal institution focus.


Core Faculty and Staff

Nancy Buenger
Joseph Conti
Martine Delannay
Stephanie Elsky
Howard S. Erlanger
Ralph Grunewald
Alexandra Huneeus
Irene B. Katele
Richard Keyser
Carolyn Lesch
Sida Liu
Michael Massoglia
Alan Rubel
Howard Schweber
Mitra Sharafi
Karl Shoemaker



Affiliated Faculty

Anuj Desai
Donald Downs
Robert E. Drechsel
Kathryn Hendley
Liane Kosaki
Larry Nesper
Asifa Quraishi



Joseph Conti
jconti@ssc.wisc.edu


Joseph Conti is an assistant professor of sociology and law at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He received his PhD in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2008 and was a post-doctoral scholar at the American Bar Foundation. Professor Conti specializes in sociology of law and economic sociology and teaches classes related to globalization, global governance, American society, and the sociology of law. His research interests include global governance, law and globalization, and international trade, particularly the dispute settlement systems of the World Trade Organization. His current research focuses on multilevel regulatory regimes for trade and for nanotechnology.

Professor Conti has published articles on the World Trade Organization in Law & Society Review, Law & Social Inquiry, and the Socio-Economic Review. With co-authors he has published articles related to nanotechnology in Environmental Science & Technology, Nature Nanotechnology, and the Journal of Nanoparticle Research. His book, Between Law and Diplomacy: the Social Contexts of Disputing at the World Trade Organization, is forthcoming in 2010 from Stanford University Press. This book is based on his dissertation, which received the Lancaster Dissertation Award from the University of California, Santa Barbara for the best social science dissertation completed between 2008 and 2010.



Martine Delannay
mcdelannay@wisc.edu
8137 Sewell Social Sciences
(608) 262-8137



Martine Delannay is the Associate Director of the Center for Law, Society, & Justice and academic advisor and administrator of the Legal Studies Program. She received her M.A. in Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a B.A. in Sociology with an interdisciplinary minor in Women Studies from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has taught sociology courses at UW-Madison, Madison College, and Mount Mary College and received a Departmental Citation for Excellence in Teaching by a Teaching Assistant while a graduate student in sociology. Delannay previously worked as an administrator for youth soccer organizations and as a community development consultant for a council that promoted independent living for persons with disabilities.

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Stephanie Elsky

7167 Helen C. White Hall

elsky@wisc.edu

Stephanie Elsky is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She holds a Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Pennsylvania. Elsky's work specializes in the relationship between law and literature, especially in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England and Ireland. She is in the midst of completing a book manuscript tentatively entitled Time Out of Mind: The Poetics of Custom and Common Law in Early Modern England, which argues for the profoundly poetic life of early modern common law, one sparked by the fictive and imaginative appeal of its existence since "time immemorial." Elsky’s research and teaching interests include the Shakespeare and the law, the early history of intellectual property, legal and literary representations of early modern colonization, and the formal and aesthetic connections between law and literature. Before arriving at UW-Madison in Fall 2013, Elsky was a Keiter/Mellon Fellow at Amherst College's Department of Law, Jurisprudence, and Social Thought.



Howard S. Erlanger
erlanger@ssc.wisc.edu
9109 Law Building
263-7405

Howard S. Erlanger served as Director of the Legal Studies Program and the Criminal Justice Certificate Program until 2013. A member of the UW faculty since 1971, he is Voss-Bascom Professor of Law, Professor of Sociology, and Director of the Institute for Legal Studies. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California at Berkeley, and a J.D. from the University of Wisconsin. Professor Erlanger is the recipient of a number of awards for his teaching and research, including the Steiger and Underkofler awards from the University for excellence in teaching, and the Wheeler mentorship award from the Law and Society Association. Professor Erlanger is a past-President of the Law and Society Association and since 1982 he has been Review Section Editor of Law and Social Inquiry, where he has solicited and edited over 400 article-length essays representing the great diversity of views in socio-legal studies. His own socio-legal research has primarily focused on the legal profession - especially on the careers of lawyers in public interest practice and the socialization of law students - and on topics related to dispute resolution and to law and organizations.



Ralph Grunewald
grunewald@wisc.edu


Ralph Grunewald has an appointment with both the Legal Studies Program and the Department of Comparative Literature, where he serves as the Director of Undergraduate Studies. At UW-Madison, Ralph teaches classes on American criminal justice, juvenile justice, comparative criminal justice, and law and literature. He also taught at the University of Mainz and the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. His research interests include (comparative) criminal law and procedure, criminal justice, and law and literature. Ralph received his law degree from the University of Mainz and the State of Bavaria, Germany, and practiced law as a defense attorney in a German law firm specializing in white-collar crime. He earned a Ph.D. in Criminal Law and Criminology from the University of Mainz in 2002 (summa cum laude) and received a Master's Degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School (2005). Ralph has published one monograph ("The De-Individualization of the Principle of Education in the German Juvenile Justice Act", German language, 2003 by Duncker & Humblot) and ten articles in law journals and is currently working on a book on Innocence Projects.



Alexandra Huneeus
huneeus@wisc.edu

Alexandra Huneeus studies the judicialization of politics, the politics of human rights, and legal culture in Latin America. Her Ph.D. dissertation centered on the Chilean judiciary’s changing attitude towards cases of Pinochet-era human rights violations. She teaches sociology of law, human rights,

Before joining the UW faculty in 2007, Professor Huneeus was a fellow at Stanford University’s Center on Democracy, Development and the Rule of Law. She received her Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley (2006), and her J.D. from Boalt Hall, the Berkeley Law School (2001). As a human rights fellow at the International Human Rights Clinic at Boalt Hall in 2004, she supervised students bringing a case before the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. The successful challenge resulted in a ruling ordering the Dominican Republic to alter its citizenship policies and practices. She also worked on the case against Augusto Pinochet in Chile and Spain, through the Center for Justice and Accountability in San Francisco.

Prior to her turn to law, Professor Huneeus worked as an editor and journalist in Santiago, Chile, her native city, and in San Francisco, her home town.

If there were more days in the week, she would spend them dancing (modern/jazz), writing, reading novels, and with her family.


Irene B. Katele
ikatele@ssc.wisc.edu




Irene B. Katele earned a JD at the University of Wisconsin Law School, a PhD and AM in History from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and a BA in History from Northwestern University. Katele taught history for four years, first at The Ohio State University and then at the University of South Carolina. As an historian, her area of expertise was piracy, and she studied its impact on Venice during the Crusades. While in law school, Katele served as Editor-in-Chief of the Wisconsin Law Review, was a member of the Moot Court Board, and worked as a judicial intern to Judge John L. Coffey of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. She also received the Abner Brodie Award for Outstanding Contribution to Life at the Law School. After law school, she clerked for Justice David Prosser, Jr. of the Wisconsin Supreme Court and then was an associate in the estate planning practice area at the Madison office of Michael Best & Friedrich LLP. Katele is licensed to practice law in Wisconsin.



Richard Keyser
rkeyser@wisc.edu



Richard Keyser teaches in the Legal Studies Program, where his classes include American Legal History I and II and Law and Environment. He also teaches a variety of classes in the History Department, such as The Renaissance and European Environmental History. He holds a Ph.D. in History from Johns Hopkins University. His research, focusing on medieval legal and environmental history, has appeared in the Revue Historique, French Historical Studies, and Law and History Review. His current projects center on customary law, examining early forms of property law, of civil law jurisdiction, and of community-based woodland management (or forest law). His work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and UW's Institute for Research on the Humanities. His essay on "The Transformation of Traditional Woodland Management" won the American Society for Environmental History's Alice Hamilton prize for best article of 2009.




Carolyn Lesch
clesch@ssc.wisc.edu
8139 Sewell Social Science Building
262-4360



Carolyn Lesch earned her Master's in Social Work from UW Madison in 1992. She first joined the Criminal Justice Certificate Program staff as a Field Instructor during the summer of 1998. Since 2003, she has served as Academic Advisor and administrator for the Program. She manages the required internship component including vital outreach to the criminal and juvenile justice communities. Carolyn teaches foundational field education and practicum courses. She has more than 20 years of direct practice experience working with court-ordered youth and their families. Carolyn is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Psychotherapist. Her areas of expertise include adolescent development, child and adolescent mental health, juvenile male sexual offending behavior, multigenerational and interfamilial sexual abuse dynamics, and family systems theory and intervention. Carolyn is a Senior Preceptor in the UW-Madison School of Social Work.





Sida Liu
sidaliu@ssc.wisc.edu


Sida Liu is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Law at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He specializes in the sociology of law, focusing on the legal reform and legal profession in contemporary China. Professor Liu received his LL.B. degree from Peking University Law School and his Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago. Professor Liu has written widely on various aspects of China's law reforms and legal profession, including lower court justice, popular legal advice, the criminal justice system, and the corporate law market. He has published articles in the Law & Society Review, Law & Social Inquiry, Annual Review of Law and Social Science, and China Quarterly, as well as extensively in leading law and social science journals in China. In addition, Professor Liu has published two books in Chinese: The Lost Polis: Transformation of the Legal Profession in Contemporary China (Peking University Press, 2008), and The Logic of Fragmentation: An Ecological Analysis of the Chinese Legal Services Market(Shanghai Joint Publishing Co., 2011). He also translated and edited The Holmes Reader: Selected Essays and Public Speeches of Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. (Shanghai Joint Publishing Co., 2009). Currently, Professor Liu is working on a large project on the politics of Chinese criminal defense lawyers, funded by the National Science Foundation and American Bar Foundation.





Michael Massoglia
mmassoglia@wisc.edu

Mike Massoglia is the Director of the Legal Studies Program and the Criminal Justice Certificate Program. He is an Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work focuses on the social consequences of the expansion of the penal system, the relationship between the use of legal controls and demographic change in the United States, and patterns and consequences of criminal behavior over the life course. Current research projects examine historical variation in U.S. criminal deportations as well as the relationship between incarceration and neighborhood attainment and racial composition. Mike teaches classes on criminology, delinquency, and deviance.




Alan Rubel
arubel@wisc.edu

Alan Rubel is an assistant professor in the School of Library and Information Studies and the Legal Studies Program. He has recently served as a senior advisor to the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Wisconsin Law School. Before joining the faculty at UW he was a Greenwall Fellow in Bioethics and Health Law Policy at Johns Hopkins University and Georgetown University. He served as a law clerk to Justice Ann Walsh Bradley of the Wisconsin Supreme Court from 2006-2008. His publications include articles on public health surveillance, philosophical conceptions of privacy, labeling genetically engineered foods, the medical privacy of presidential candidates, the USA Patriot Act, and persons' claims to privacy. His current research includes projects on public health surveillance, privacy in the context of libraries and electronic resources, and foundations of criminal law. Before graduate school he worked as a biological technician and ranger for the National Park Service.

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Howard Schweber
schweber@polisci.wisc.edu

Howard Schweber joined the University of Wisconsin-Madison in Fall 1999. He received his PhD in Government from Cornell University in 1999 and an MA in History from the University of Chicago after spending five years practicing law. He teaches courses focusing on constitutional law and legal and political theory. He is the author of Speech, Conduct and the First Amendment (Peter Lang Press, 2003), The Creation of American Common Law, 1850-1880: Technology, Politics, and the Construction of Citizenship (Cambridge 2004), and The Language of Liberal Constitutionalism (Cambridge 2007), as well as articles, essays, and book chapters on a variety of related topics. His current areas of research include comparative analyses of different constitutional systems and the construction of "public" and "private" as categories of legal and political discourse. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Wisconsin Center for the Study of Liberal Democracy and in the past has been actively involved with the Center for Civic Education's We the People program. In addition, Schweber was the coach of the UW-Madison's College Mock Trial Team from 1999-2002, but has retired, according to a spokesman, "to spend more time with his family." Professor Schweber is regularly featured on Wisconsin Public Radio programs and gives frequent newspaper and television interviews. In 2004 he was the recipient of the William H. Kiekhoffer Award for Distinguished Teaching. He has also twice been selected as the Pi Sigma Alpha Professor of the Year.




Mitra Sharafi
sharafi@wisc.edu


Mitra Sharafi is a legal historian of colonial India. She holds two UK law degrees (BA Cambridge 1998, BCL Oxford 1999) and a doctorate in History (PhD Princeton 2006). She teaches two undergraduate Legal Studies courses, namely "Legal Pluralism" and "Law and Colonialism." She also teaches contract law to first-year law students. Sharafi has written on South Asian legal history (including the history of Zoroastrian and Islamic personal law), the history of the legal profession, legal pluralism, and slavery.Currently, she is completing a book manuscript entitled, "Parsi Legal Culture in British India." Her book examines one colonized ethno-religious minority that adopted the colonizers' law ways to an unusual degree. Her next major project will be a study of medical jurisprudence in British India. In 2009-11, Sharafi's research was funded by the National Science Foundation. In 2011-12, she will hold a fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. Sharafi maintains a website of South Asian Legal History Resources, which includes her publications: http://hosted.law.wisc.edu/wordpress/sharafi/



Karl Shoemaker
kbshoemaker@wisc.edu
4046 Humanities
263-1830



Karl Shoemaker is Associate Professor of History and Law. He holds a PhD in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California, Berkeley, and
a JD from Cumberland School of Law. He is a legal historian, with particular focus on pre-modern legal traditions. His research and teaching interests include the history of criminal law and punishment, and historical and philosophical approaches to the institutions of modern criminal justice. He is currently an Associate Editor
of the Journal of Law Culture and the Humanities. In 2006-07, Professor Shoemaker was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. He has also held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the North American Conference on British Studies. He is currently working on the history of the right to sanctuary as well as a set of medieval texts which imagined the devil as a litigant. Recent publications include (with William Courtenay) "The Tears of Nicholas: Simony and Perjury by a Parisian Master of Theology in the Fourteenth Century," Accepted by Speculum (forthcoming, 2008); "Revenge as a 'Medium Good' in the Twelfth Century" in 1 Law, Culture, and Humanities, 333-358 (2005); "The Birth of Official Criminal Prosecutions in American Law" in Rechtssystem im Vergleich: Die Staatsanwaltschaft (2005), The Problem of Pain in Punishment: A Historical Perspective," in Pain, Death, and the Law (A. Sarat, ed., 2001); and "Criminal Procedure in Medieval European Law: A Comparison Between English and Roman-Canonical Developments after the IV Lateran Council," Zeitschrift der Savigny-Stiftung für Rechtsgeschichte - Kanonistische Abteilung (1999).