Skip to main content

Local navigation

 

About the Center for Law, Society and Justice

The Center for Law, Society, and Justice is the institutional home of the Legal Studies Program and the Criminal Justice Certificate Program.

The faculty of the Center for Law, Society and Justice come from a wide variety of disciplines. Many faculty have a primary affiliation with a tenure granting unit such as Law, History, Political Science, or Sociology.

The Core Faculty teach a combination of disciplinary courses with a law focus and courses specifically designed to be interdisciplinary. Their teaching includes the gateway courses in the Legal Studies curriculum (Legal Studies 131 and 217) and the Legal Studies core perspectives courses. Core Faculty members participate in curricular design and course development activities, set policies for students in the Center programs, and provide guidance to academic staff.

In addition to the Core Faculty, a number of Affiliated Faculty teach a variety of disciplinary courses that have a law or legal institution focus.


Core Faculty and Staff

Patricia Coffey
Joseph Conti
Martine Delannay
Howard S. Erlanger
Ralph Grunewald
Alexandra Huneeus
Richard Keyser
Carolyn Lesch
Michael Light
Michael Massoglia
Ion Meyn
Melanie Murchison
Alan Rubel
Jordan Rosenblum
Mitra Sharafi
Karl Shoemaker



Affiliated Faculty

Anuj Desai
Donald Downs
Robert E. Drechsel
Kathryn Hendley
Liane Kosaki
Ernesto Livorni
Larry Nesper
Asifa Quraishi



Patricia Coffey is a Forensic Psychologist and UW-Madison Psych Department Faculty Associate. She has undergraduate degrees in Psychology and Ibero-American Studies from the UW-Madison and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Vermont. She has been in private practice in Madison for over 20 years providing treatment and forensic evaluation services. In addition to private practice, she also worked half-time for Mendota Mental Health Institute and the Sand Ridge Secure Treatment Center for 9 years. In 2014 she started working full time in the UW-Psych Department teaching The Criminal Mind: A Forensic and Psychobiological Perspective, Introductory Psychology, and Service Learning courses. She also trains and supervises a Ph.D. student in forensic assessment.


Joseph Conti
jconti@ssc.wisc.edu


Joseph Conti is an assistant professor of sociology and law at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He received his PhD in Sociology from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2008 and was a post-doctoral scholar at the American Bar Foundation. Professor Conti specializes in sociology of law and economic sociology and teaches classes related to globalization, global governance, American society, and the sociology of law. His research interests include global governance, law and globalization, and international trade, particularly the dispute settlement systems of the World Trade Organization. His current research focuses on multilevel regulatory regimes for trade and for nanotechnology.

Professor Conti has published articles on the World Trade Organization in Law & Society Review, Law & Social Inquiry, and the Socio-Economic Review. With co-authors he has published articles related to nanotechnology in Environmental Science & Technology, Nature Nanotechnology, and the Journal of Nanoparticle Research. His book, Between Law and Diplomacy: the Social Contexts of Disputing at the World Trade Organization, is forthcoming in 2010 from Stanford University Press. This book is based on his dissertation, which received the Lancaster Dissertation Award from the University of California, Santa Barbara for the best social science dissertation completed between 2008 and 2010.



Martine Delannay
mcdelannay@wisc.edu



Martine Delannay is the Associate Director of the Center for Law, Society, & Justice and an academic advisor for the Legal Studies Program and Criminal Justice Certificate Program. She received her M.A. in Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a B.A. in Sociology with an interdisciplinary minor in Women Studies from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She has taught sociology courses at UW-Madison, Madison College, and Mount Mary College and received a Departmental Citation for Excellence in Teaching by a Teaching Assistant while a graduate student in sociology. Martine previously worked as an administrator for youth soccer organizations and as a community development consultant for a council that promoted independent living for persons with disabilities.




Howard S. Erlanger
erlanger@ssc.wisc.edu


Howard S. Erlanger served as Director of the Legal Studies Program and the Criminal Justice Certificate Program from 2007-2013. A member of the UW faculty since 1971, he is Voss-Bascom Professor of Law, Emeritus, and Emeritus Professor of Sociology. He holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California at Berkeley, and a J.D. from the University of Wisconsin. Professor Erlanger is the recipient of a number of awards for his teaching and research, including the Steiger and Underkofler awards from the University for excellence in teaching, and the Wheeler mentorship award from the Law and Society Association. Professor Erlanger is a past-President of the Law and Society Association and since 1982 he has been Review Section Editor of Law and Social Inquiry, where he has solicited and edited over 400 article-length essays representing the great diversity of views in socio-legal studies. His own socio-legal research has primarily focused on the legal profession - especially on the careers of lawyers in public interest practice and the socialization of law students - and on topics related to dispute resolution and to law and organizations.



Ralph Grunewald
grunewald@wisc.edu


Ralph Grunewald is an assistant professor in the Department of Comparative Literature & Folklore Studies and the Legal Studies Program. He studies the relationship between law and the humanities and literature in particular. Ralph received his law degree from the University of Mainz and the State of Bavaria, Germany, a Ph.D. in Criminal Law and Criminology from the University of Mainz (2002, summa cum laude) and a Master's Degree (LL.M.) from the University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School (2005). He has taught at German law schools but also practiced law at a law firm specializing on white collar and corporate crime defense work. At UW-Madison, Ralph teaches classes on American criminal justice, juvenile justice, comparative criminal justice, and law and literature. His publications include a monograph on the principle of education in in the German Juvenile Court Act and various articles on questions of criminal law and legal narratology. He is currently working on comparative problems of wrongful convictions and on a larger project in which he assesses the legal and literary construction of guilt.

Ralph is a member of the UW-Madison Teaching Academy and a Bradley Learning Community Faculty Fellow. He has been selected to receive the William H. Kiekhofer Teaching Award.



Alexandra Huneeus
huneeus@wisc.edu

Alexandra Huneeus studies international courts, international human rights, and courts and politics in Latin America. Her work stands at the intersection of law, political science and sociology, and has been published in the American Journal of International Law, Law and Social Inquiry, Yale Journal of International Law, Cornell International Law Journal and by Cambridge University Press. In 2013, she was awarded the American Association for Law Schools Scholarly Papers Prize, as well as the American Society for Comparative Law Award for Younger Scholars (for two different articles). Currently, she holds an NSF grant to explore the impact of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights on domestic prosecutions of state atrocity. She is Associate Professor of Law and Legal Studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, received her PhD, JD and BA from University of California, Berkeley, and was a post-doc at Stanford's Center on Development, Democracy and the Rule of Law. Professor Huneeus is on the Board of Editors of the American Journal of International Law, and is a founding board member of the Brazilian Journal of Empirical/Socio-Legal Studies. She holds a permanent visiting professorship at the Universidad Diego Portales Law School in Santiago, Chile.




Richard Keyser
rkeyser@wisc.edu



Richard Keyser's teaching and research interests focus on legal and environmental history. He teaches primarily for the Legal Studies Program, including a two-semester sequence on American Legal History (Legal Studies/History 261-262: to the Civil War, and from then to the Present) and Law and Environment (Legal Studies/Environmental Studies 430). He also teaches classes for the History Department, currently including European Environmental History (History/Environmental Studies 328). He has a Ph.D. in History from Johns Hopkins University. His work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities and has appeared in Law and History, French Historical Studies, and Revue Historique. His current projects center on customary law, early property law, and community-based methods of woodland management.




Carolyn Lesch
clesch@ssc.wisc.edu



Carolyn Lesch earned her Master's in Social Work from UW Madison in 1992. She first joined the Criminal Justice Certificate Program staff as a Field Instructor during the summer of 1998. Since 2003, she has served as Academic Advisor and administrator for the Program. She manages the required internship component including vital outreach to the criminal and juvenile justice communities. Carolyn teaches foundational field education and practicum courses. She has more than 20 years of direct practice experience working with court-ordered youth and their families. Carolyn is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and Psychotherapist. Her areas of expertise include adolescent development, child and adolescent mental health, juvenile male sexual offending behavior, multigenerational and interfamilial sexual abuse dynamics, and family systems theory and intervention. Carolyn is a Senior Preceptor in the UW-Madison School of Social Work.




Michael Light
mlight@ssc.wisc.edu


Michael Light is an Assistant Professor of Sociology and Chican@ and Latino@ Studies. His teaching and research interests largely focus on the legal and criminological consequences of international migration, and the relationship between racial/ethnic stratification and crime. Current projects in these areas examine the punishment of non-U.S. citizens before and after 9/11 as well as the relationship between undocumented immigration and violent crime. Recent publications include "Citizenship and Punishment: The Salience of National Membership in U.S. Criminal Courts" (American Sociological Review); "Explaining the Gaps in White, Black and Hispanic Violence since 1990: Accounting for Immigration, Incarceration, and Inequality" (American Sociological Review); Re-examining the Relationship between Latino Immigration and Racial/Ethnic Violence" (Social Science Research); and "Undocumented Immigration, Drug Problems, and Driving under the influence (DUI), 1990-2014" (American Journal of Public Health).



Michael Massoglia
mmassoglia@wisc.edu

Mike Massoglia served as the Director of the Legal Studies Program and the Criminal Justice Certificate Program from 2013 to 2017. He is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His work focuses on the social consequences of the expansion of the penal system, the relationship between the use of legal controls and demographic change in the United States, and patterns and consequences of criminal behavior over the life course. Current research projects examine historical variation in U.S. criminal deportations as well as the relationship between incarceration and neighborhood attainment and racial composition. Mike teaches classes on criminology, delinquency, and deviance.




Ion Meyn
meyn@wisc.edu

Ion Meyn teaches Civil Rights, Race and the Law, and Wrongful Convictions. An Assistant Professor at the law school, his research focuses on criminal procedure. Professor Meyn clerked for Federal District Judge Bernice Donald, who now serves on the Sixth Circuit. In private practice, he represented judges, elected officials, and political action committees. Professor Meyn also served as clinical faculty at the Wisconsin Innocence Project. He led the legal team that freed Seneca Malone from being wrongfully convicted of intentional homicide, and also served on the team that successfully argued for a new trial for Terry Vollbrecht.




Melanie Murchison

mmurchison@wisc.edu

Melanie Janelle Murchison is an Associate Lecturer in the Department of Sociology and the Legal Studies Program. She earned her Ph.D. in Law from Queen's University Belfast and also holds an Honours BA in Criminal Justice from the University of Winnipeg and a MA in Legal Studies from Carleton University. Melanie has been nominated for two Outstanding Teaching Awards, and has taught a variety of subjects, including Law, Criminology, Sociology and Legal Studies in Universities across Canada and Northern Ireland. Melanie's research interests include Comparative Constitutional Law, Judicial Behaviour, Legal Reasoning and Legal Methodology. She recently held a British Academy Leverhulme Grant as a Co-Investigator with Dr. Alex Schwartz on Ethnic Voting Behaviour on the Constitutional Court in Bosnia-Herzegovina. From that grant, they recently published the article "Judicial Impartiality and Independence in Divided Societies: An Empirical Analysis of the Constitutional Court of Bosnia-Herzegovina" in Law and Society Review. Feel free to follow her on Twitter @drmmurchison.




Jordan Rosenblum
jrosenblum@wisc.edu

Jordan D. Rosenblum is an Associate Professor and the Belzer Professor of Classical Judaism. He is the Director of the Religious Studies Program and the Director of Graduate Studies for the Comparative Literature and Folklore Studies Department. He is the author of Food and Identity in Early Rabbinic Judaism (Cambridge University Press, 2010; paperback, 2014); The Jewish Dietary Laws in the Ancient World (Cambridge University Press, 2016); the co-editor of Religious Competition in the Third Century CE: Jews, Christians, and the Greco-Roman World (Vandenhoek and Ruprecht, 2014); and the Ancient Judaism Editor for the journal Currents in Biblical Research. His research focuses on the law and culture of the classical rabbinic period, particularly on the kosher food laws. Recent publications include: "Changing the Subject: Rabbinic Legal Process in the Absence of Justification" (The Review of Rabbinic Judaism, 18 [2015]); "Thou Shalt Not Cook a Bird in its Mother's Milk?: Theorizing the Evolution of a Rabbinic Regulation" (Religious Studies and Rabbinics, edited by Elizabeth Shanks Alexander and Beth A. Berkowitz, Routledge, forthcoming); and "'Blessings of the Breasts': Breastfeeding in Rabbinic Literature" (Hebrew Union College Annual, forthcoming in 2017). For articles and an up-to-date CV, see: https://wisc.academia.edu/JordanRosenblum





Alan Rubel
arubel@wisc.edu

Alan Rubel is the Director of the Legal Studies Program and the Criminal Justice Certificate Program and an associate professor in the iSchool and in the Center for Law, Society, and Justice. In 2012 he served as a senior advisor to the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. He received his Ph.D. from the Department of Philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Wisconsin Law School. Before joining the faculty at UW he was a Greenwall Fellow in Bioethics and Health Law Policy at Johns Hopkins University and Georgetown University. He served as a law clerk to Justice Ann Walsh Bradley of the Wisconsin Supreme Court from 2006-2008. His publications include articles on public health surveillance, philosophical conceptions of privacy, labeling genetically engineered foods, the medical privacy of presidential candidates, the USA Patriot Act, and persons' claims to privacy. His current research includes projects on public health surveillance, privacy in the context of libraries and electronic resources, and foundations of criminal law. Before graduate school he worked as a biological technician and ranger for the National Park Service.



Mitra Sharafi
sharafi@wisc.edu


Mitra Sharafi is a legal historian of South Asia at the University of Wisconsin Law School. She holds law degrees from Cambridge (BA 1998) and Oxford (BCL 1999) and history degrees from McGill (BA 1996) and Princeton (PhD 2006). She has taught at the UW Law School and Legal Studies program since 2007, and is affiliated with the UW History Department and Center for South Asia. Sharafi’s research interests include South Asian legal history; the history of colonialism; the history of the legal profession; law and religion; law and minorities; legal pluralism; and the history of science and medicine. Her book, Law and Identity in Colonial South Asia: Parsi Legal Culture, 1772-1947 (Cambridge University Press, 2014) was awarded the Law and Society Association’s 2015 J. Willard Hurst Prize for socio-legal history. She is currently working on a book-length project medico-legal history in colonial India, as well as articles on abortion in colonial India and on non-Europeans from across the British Empire who studied law at London’s Inns of Court during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Sharafi's research has been recognized and supported by the Institute for Advanced Study, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the Social Science Research Council and others. You can follow her South Asian Legal History Resources blog at http://hosted.law.wisc.edu/wordpress/sharafi/ and on Twitter @mjsharafi.



Karl Shoemaker
kbshoemaker@wisc.edu



Karl Shoemaker is Associate Professor of History and Law. He holds a PhD in Jurisprudence and Social Policy from the University of California, Berkeley, and
a JD from Cumberland School of Law. He is a legal historian, with particular focus on pre-modern legal traditions. His research and teaching interests include the history of criminal law and punishment, and historical and philosophical approaches to the institutions of modern criminal justice. He is currently an Associate Editor
of the Journal of Law Culture and the Humanities. In 2006-07, Professor Shoemaker was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. He has also held fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the North American Conference on British Studies. He is currently working on the history of the right to sanctuary as well as a set of medieval texts which imagined the devil as a litigant. Recent publications include (with William Courtenay) "The Tears of Nicholas: Simony and Perjury by a Parisian Master of Theology in the Fourteenth Century," Accepted by Speculum (forthcoming, 2008); "Revenge as a 'Medium Good' in the Twelfth Century" in 1 Law, Culture, and Humanities, 333-358 (2005); "The Birth of Official Criminal Prosecutions in American Law" in Rechtssystem im Vergleich: Die Staatsanwaltschaft (2005), The Problem of Pain in Punishment: A Historical Perspective," in Pain, Death, and the Law (A. Sarat, ed., 2001); and "Criminal Procedure in Medieval European Law: A Comparison Between English and Roman-Canonical Developments after the IV Lateran Council," Zeitschrift der Savigny-Stiftung für Rechtsgeschichte - Kanonistische Abteilung (1999).



© 2014 Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System