Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #76--March 22, 2001

CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar/caar-index.htm

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I. Data:

1. HRS: The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research Health and Retirement Study has announced the release of "Respondent Mobility Information." "These files contain information on inter-wave changes in respondent's location of residence. Distance was calculated for all respondents who were interviewed in a residence location differing from that of the previous wave and for whom geographic information was available. The distance value was calculated to the nearest nautical mile based on the latitude and longitude of Zip Code centroids." For more information see:

http://www.umich.edu/~hrswww/news/news114.html
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2. MEPS: The US Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) has released the 1997 Office-Based Medical Provider Visits File (HC-016G) of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (Household Component Event files). Data, documentation, and SAS programming statements are available at:

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Data_Pub/HC_EventData97.htm

Note: Interested users should read the "Notes on Downloading Files" section before downloading files.

More information on MEPS:

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/

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II. Reports and articles:

3. SSA OASDI TRUSTEE REPORT: "2001 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance and Disability Insurance Trust Funds," (US Social Security Administration, March 2001, HTML and .pdf format, 190p.).

Abstract:

The 2001 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance and Disability Insurance Trust Funds, issued on March 19, 2001, has a new format with 6 main sections. With the exception of the introductory section, each section is divided into subsections. There are 66 tables and 13 charts. Each of the subsections, tables, and figures (graphs or charts) has an entry in the table of contents, list of tables, or list of figures, respectively.

News Release:

http://www.ssa.gov/pressoffice/2001trustees.htm

Report:

http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/TR/TR01/index.html

Note: Click on "PDF" to view electronic full-text.
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4. HCFA REPORTS: The US Health Care Financing Administration has released "2001 Annual Reports of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Hospital Insurance and Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Funds." These include "2001 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Hospital Insurance Trust Fund" (.pdf format, 110p. with HTML tables), and "2001 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Fund" (.pdf format, 97p., with HTML tables).

http://www.hcfa.gov/pubforms/tr/
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5. SSA: "2001 Social Security Handbook," (US Social Security Administration, March 2001). "This Social Security Handbook is one of numerous publications about the Social Security programs. It also contains brief descriptions of related programs administered by other agencies. It is a readable, easy to understand resource for the very complex Social Security programs and services."

http://www.ssa.gov/OP_Home/handbook/handbook.html
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6. DHHS OIG OEI REPORT: "Medicare Payments for the Same Service by More Than One Carrier" (US Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General Office of Evaluations and Inspections OEI-03-00-00090, March 2001, .pdf format, 14p.).

Abstract:

In this inspection, we reviewed billings by 86 providers for a sample of 242 potentially duplicate services involving 15 procedure codes. We found that Medicare's claims processing system did not prevent duplicate payments by more than one carrier for any of the sample services. Based on our review of documentation provided by the providers none of the double billings were justified. We estimated total improper allowances for the sample services to be approximately $446,000. We recommended that HCFA revise Common Working Files edits to detect and deny duplicate billings to more than one carrier. If this recommendation is determined not to be cost effective, then increase post-payment reviews should be conducted, particularly in areas where providers commonly perform services in multiple carrier jurisdictions. The HCFA concurred with our recommendations.

http://www.hhs.gov/oig/oei/reports/a516.pdf
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7. HRS BIBLIOGRAPHY UPDATE: The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research Health and Retirement Study website has updated the HRS bibliography. The following publications from 2001 have been added:

Brown, J.R. and M.J. Warshawsky. 2001. "Longevity-Insured Retirement Distributions from Pension Plans: Market and Regulatory Issues." NBER Working Paper No. 8064.

Chan, Sewin and Ann Huff Stevens. 2001. "The Effects of Job Loss on Older Workers." In _Ensuring Health and Income Security for an Aging Workforce_, eds. P. Budetti, R. Burkhauser, J. Gregory and H.A. Hunt. Kalamazoo: W.E. Upjohn Institute.

Chan, Sewin and Ann Huff Stevens. 2001. "Retirement Incentives and Expectations." NBER Working Paper No. 8082.

Gallo, William T., Elizabeth H. Bradley, Michele Siegel, and Stanislav V. Kasl. 2001. "The Impact of Involuntary Job Loss on Subsequent Alcohol Consumption by Older Workers." _Journals of Gerontology: Social Sciences_, 56B(1)S3-9.

Langa, Kenneth M., Michael E. Chernew, Mohammed U. Kabeto and Steven J. Katz. 2001. "The Explosion in Paid Home Health Care in the 1990s: Who Received the Additional Services?" _Medical Care_, 39(2):147-57.

Shea, Dennis G., Pamela F. Short and M. Paige Powell. 2001. "Betwixt and Between: Targeting Coverage Reforms to Those Approaching Medicare." _Health Affairs_, 20(1):219-30.

http://www.umich.edu/~hrswww/pubs/papers/bib_all.html
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8. AUSTRALIAN DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND AGED CARE OFFICE FOR OLDER AUSTRALIANS REPORT: "Population Ageing and the Economy," (Access Pty. Ltd., January 2001, .pdf format, 83p.). Several factsheets are included.

Abstract:

This research, commissioned through Access Economics, describes the micro and macro issues surrounding the projected increase in the supply of mature age workers and the implications of the baby boomer cohort for the market place for goods and services in the coming decades.

News Release:

http://www.health.gov.au/mediarel/yr2001/bb/bb01014.htm

Report:

http://www.health.gov.au/acc/ofoa/research_and_data/access_economics.htm
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9. HCFA NEWS RELEASE: "Medicare to Cover Angioplasty of the Carotid Artery" (US Health Care Financing Administration Medicare News, Mar. 20, 2001).

http://www.hcfa.gov/news/pr2001/pr010320.htm
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10. _SCIENCE_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT: Note: Full electronic text (HTML format) may be available. Check your organization's library. "Sardinia's Mysterious Male Methuselahs," by Robert Koenig (_Science_, Vol. 291, No. 5511, Mar. 16, 2001, p. 2074-2076).

http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/summary/291/5511/2074
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11. _NEJM_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT, HEALTH POLICY ARTICLE, BOOK REVIEW:

A. "The Japanese Experience with Vaccinating Schoolchildren against Influenza," by Thomas A. Reichert, Norio Sugaya, David S. Fedson, W. Paul Glezen, Lone Simonsen, and Masato Tashiro (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 344, No. 12, Mar. 22, 2001, p. 889-896).

http://www.nejm.org/content/2001/0344/0012/0889.asp

B. "Medicare," by Marilyn Moon (_New England Journal of Medicine_ Health Policy, Vol. 344, No. 12, Mar. 22, 2001). Note: This article is freely available to the public.

http://www.nejm.org/content/2001/0344/0012/0928.asp

C. _The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging_, by S. Jay Olshansky and Bruce A. Carnes, reviewed by Howard Chertkow (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 344, No. 12, Mar. 22, 2001). Note: This article is freely available to the public.

http://www.nejm.org/content/2001/0344/0012/0941.asp
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12. _JAMA_ THEME ISSUE: WOMEN'S HEALTH: This week's _Journal of the American Medical Association_ (Vol. 285, No. 11, Mar. 21, 2001) is a special theme issue devoted to women's health. In the issue are several articles that may be of interest to researchers in aging. The articles cover topics such as estrogen replacement therapy, post-menopausal issues, and exercise and aging. Abstracts only are available for the research articles (note: full electronic text [HTML and .pdf format] may be available; check your organization's library). Full text (HTML and .pdf format) is available for the feature and news articles.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v285n11/toc.html
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13. _THE LANCET_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT: Note: _The Lancet_ requires free registration before providing content. "Oral amiodarone for prevention of atrial fibrillation after open heart surgery, the Atrial Fibrillation Suppression Trial (AFIST): a randomised placebo-controlled trial," by Satyendra Giri, C. Michael White, Alisha B. Dunn, Kathy Felton, Linda Freeman-Bosco, Prabashni Reddy, James P. Tsikouris, Heather A. Wilcox, and Jeffrey Kluger (_The Lancet_, vol. 357, No. 9259, Mar. 17, 2001, p. 830-836).

http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol357/iss9259/abs/llan.357.9259.original_research.15521.1
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14. _BMJ_ NEWS EXTRA, PRIMARY CARE, EDUCATION AND DEBATE:

A. "MEPs try to mobilise public opinion against extension of euthanasia," by Rory Watson (_British Medical Journal_, Vol. 322, Issue 7287, Mar. 17, 2001, HTML format, p. 638).

http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/322/7287/638/c

B. "Reducing prescribing of highly anticholinergic antidepressants for elderly people: randomised trial of group versus individual academic detailing," by Martine E.C. van Eijk, Jerry Avorn, Arijan J. Porsius, and Anthonius de Boer (_British Medical Journal_, Vol. 322, Issue 7287, Mar. 17, 2001, HTML and .pdf format, p. 654).

http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/322/7287/654

C. "Maintaining the dignity and autonomy of older people in the healthcare setting," by Kate Lothian and Ian Philp (_British Medical Journal_, Vol. 322, Issue 7287, Mar. 17, 2001, HTML and .pdf format, p. 668-670).

http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/322/7287/668
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15. MEDSCAPE ARTICLES: Note: Medscape requires free registration before providing articles.

A. WOMENS HEALTH MEDLINE ABSTRACTS: "Women as Caregivers: Health Implications," (Medscape Women's Health, Vol. 6, No. 2, March/April 2001)."This easy-to-navigate collection of recent MEDLINE abstracts compiled by the editors at Medscape focuses on recent research on the health implications of caregiving by aging women."

http://womenshealth.medscape.com/Medscape/WomensHealth/journal/2001/v06.n02/ca-wh0313.01/ca-wh0313.01.html

B. "Enhancing Caregiver Outcomes in Palliative Care," by Ruth McCorkle, and Jeannie V. Pasacreta (_Cancer Control: Journal of the Moffitt Cancer Center_, Vol. 8, No. 1, January/February 2001, p. 36-45).

http://www.medscape.com/35044.rhtml?srcmp=ms-031601

or

http://www.medscape.com/moffitt/CancerControl/2001/v08.n01/cc0801.03.mcco/cc0801.03.mcco-01.html
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16. AARP PRIME TIME RADIO: Note: This is an audio transcript and listeners will need the RealPlayer plug-in or helper application to hear it.

Mar. 13, 2001: "Money Between Generations." "Certified Financial Planner Carol Akright says if families band together across generations and talk about money, they will be better able to realize their dreams. It's a revolutionary approach bound to spark some interesting kitchen-table conversations, since money is still a taboo subject. Akright's book is: _Funding Your Dreams Generation to Generation_." Running time: 23 minutes 56 seconds.

http://www.aarp.org/ontheair/ptrtopics.html

Scroll to "Money Between Generations".
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17. _TIME_ ARTICLES:

A."Missing Memories," by Christine Gorman (_Time_, Vol. 157, No. 12, Mar. 26, 2001).

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,102944,00.html

B. "Guardian Angels," by Christine Gorman (_Time_, Vol. 157, No. 12, Mar. 26, 2001).

http://www.time.com/time/personal/article/0,9171,102932,00.html =======================================================================

III. Working Papers:

18. MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE FOR DEMOGRAPHIC RESEARCH:

A. "Examining Structural Shifts in Mortality Using the Lee-Carter Method," by Lawrence R. Carter and Alexia Prskawetz (WP 2001-07, March 2001, .pdf format, 16p.).

Abstract:

We present an extension of the Lee-Carter method of modeling mortality to examine structural shifts in trajectories of mortality. Austrian data consisting of 53 years of single-age mortality rates are subdivided into 30 24-year submatrices. Using singular value decomposition, the submatrices are decomposed into three component submatrices: 1) the multiple realizations of the index of mortality to which each respective age-specific death rate is linearly related; 2) the average shape across age of the log of mortality schedules; 3) the sensitivity of the log of mortality at each age to variations in the elements of the index of mortality. We refer to these latter submatrices to locate structural changes in mortality patterns. A comparison of the observed and estimated life expectancy indicates that the extended Lee-Carter method is superior to the original Lee-Carter method, particularly so for life expectancies at higher ages. We conclude by projecting life expectancy up to 2050, applying the Lee-Carter method to the whole time series (1947-1999) and comparing it to an application of the Lee-Carter method to the latest subsample (1976-1999).

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/Papers/Working/wp-2001-007.pdf

B. "Intergenerational transfers: The ignored role of time," by Sumon Kumar Bhaumik (WP 2001-08, February 2001, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

The literature on inter vivos and intergenerational transfers has largely focussed on the possible determinants of such transfers. Specifically, much of the empirical work has examined whether transfers are driven by altruistic relationship between "dynastic" households. However, the empirical literature has consistently overlooked the possibility that transfers may be driven by specific events in the recipients lives like marriage, childbirth and illness. Further, it has not addressed the possibility that within a reasonably long time frame say, one year, transfers may influence household income as much as household income influences the probability and magnitude of transfers. This paper addresses these lacunae in the existing literature. Using GSOEP data from the 1996 and 1997 surveys, it shows that demographic and other events determine transfers to a significant extent, and also that overlooking the possible endogeneity of income may lead to bias in the econometric estimations.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/Papers/Working/wp-2001-008.pdf
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19. NBER: Note: Click on "PDF" or request paper via email at the bottom of the abstract for full text.

A. "Generational Policy," by Laurence J. Kotlikoff (US National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper W8163, March 2001, .pdf format, 96p.).

Abstract:

Generational policy is a fundamental aspect of a nation's fiscal affairs. The policy involves redistributing resources across generations and allocating to particular generations the burden of paying the government's bills. This chapter of the second edition of The _Handbook of Public Economics_ shows how generational policy works, how it's measured, and how much it matters to virtual as well as real economies. The chapter shows the zero-sum nature of generational policy. It then illustrates generational policy; the difference between statutory and true fiscal incidence. It also illuminates the arbitrary nature of fiscal labels as well as their associated fiscal aggregates, including the budget deficit, aggregate tax revenues, and aggregate transfer payments. Finally, it illustrates the various guises of generational policy, including structural tax changes, running budget deficits, altering investment incentives, and expanding pay-as-you-go-financed social security. Once this example has been milked, the chapter shows that its lessons about the arbitrary nature of fiscal labels are general. They apply to any neoclassical model with rational economic agents and rational economic institutions. This demonstration sets the stage for the description, illustration, and critique of generational accounting. The chapter's final sections use a simulation model to illustrate generational policy, consider the theoretical and empirical case for and against Ricardian Equivalence, discuss government risk sharing and risk making, and summarize lessons learned.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W8163

B. "Life-Cycle Saving, Limits on Contributions to DC Pension Plans, and Lifetime Tax Benefits," by Jagadeesh Gokhale, Laurence J. Kotlikoff and Mark J. Warshawsky (US National Bureau of Economic Research Working Paper W8170, March 2001, .pdf format, 42p.).

Abstract:

This paper addresses three questions related to limits on DC contributions. The first is whether statutory limits on tax-deductible contributions to defined contribution (DC) plans are likely to be binding, focusing on households in various economic situations. The second is how large is the tax benefit from participating in defined contribution plans. The third is how does the defined contribution tax benefit depend on the level of lifetime income. We find that the statutory limits bind those older middle-income households who started their pension savings programs late in life, those who plan to retire early, single-earner households, those who are not borrowing constrained, and those with rapid rates of real wage growth. Most households with high levels of earnings, regardless of age or situation, are also constrained by the contribution limits. Lower or middle-income two-earner households that can look forward to modest real earnings growth are likely to be borrowing constrained for most of their pre-retirement years because of the costs of paying a mortgage and sending children to college. These households are not in a position to save the 25 percent of earnings allowed as a contribution to DC plans. Some of these middle-income households, however, are constrained by the $10,500 limit on elective employee contributions to 401(k) plans if the households have access to only these plans and their employers make no pension contributions for them. The borrowing constraints faced by many lower- and middle-income Americans means that contributions to DC plans must come at the price of lower consumption when young and the benefit of higher consumption when old. Indeed, for a stylized household earning $50,000, consistently contributing 10 percent of salary to a DC plans that earns a 4 percent real return means consuming almost two times more when old than when young. Measured as a share of lifetime consumption, the tax benefit from participating in a DC plan can be significant. Assuming annual contribution rates at the average of the maximum levels allowed by employers in 401(k) plans and assuming a 4 percent return on DC and non-DC assets, the benefit is 2 percent for two-earner households earning $25,000 per year, 3.4 percent for those earning $100,000 per year, and 9.8 percent for those earning $300,000 per year. Contribution ceilings limit the benefit at the highest regions of the household earnings distribution. The extent of the benefit is also quite sensitive to the assumed rate of return on DC and non-DC assets.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W8170
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20. BOSTON COLLEGE CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH: "Retiring Together or Working Alone: The Impact of Spousal Employment and Disability on Retirement Decisions," by Richard W. Johnson and Melissa Faverault (WP #2001-01, March 2001, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

Husbands and wives often coordinate retirement decisions, as many married workers withdraw from the labor force at about the same time as their spouses. However, joint retirement behavior may differ for couples in which one spouse retires with health problems. In those cases, the able-bodied spouse may delay retirement to compensate for the earnings lost by the disabled spouse. This paper examines the retirement decisions of husbands and wives and how they interact with spousal health and employment, using data from the 1992-1998 waves of the Health and Retirement Study. The results indicate that both men and women are more likely to retire if their spouses have already retired than if they are still working. However, they are less likely to retire if their spouses appear to have left the labor force because of health problems, especially when spouses are not yet eligible for Social Security retirement benefits. There is no evidence that spousal caregiving demands affect retirement rates.

http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/csom/executive/crr/wp_2001-01.shtml

Click on "click here" for full text.
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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

21. American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 153, No. 6, Mar. 15, 2001). Note: Electronic full text (HTML and .pdf format) may be available. Check your organization's library.

http://aje.oupjournals.org/content/vol153/issue6/index.shtml

22. The Gerontologist (Vol. 41, No. 2, April 2001). Note: This journal is available in full electronic text in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.geron.org/journals/tgcontents.htm

23. Journal of Gerontology (A): Biological Sciences (Vol. 55A, No. 4, April 2001). Note: This journal is available in full electronic text in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.geron.org/journals/biocontents.html

24. Journal of Gerontology (A): Medical Sciences (Vol. 55A, No. 4, April 2001). Note: This journal is available in full electronic text in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.geron.org/journals/medcontents.html

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V. Books:

25. INED _POPULATION AN ENGLISH SELECTION_: The Institute National D'etudes Demographiques has released "Biodemographic perspectives on Human Longevity (2001, Vol. 13). "In an innovative approach, it brings together contributors from the US, Britain, China, Denmark, France, Belgium and other countries working in demography, biology and other disciplines. It will be exhibited at the upcoming annual PAA (Population Association of America) meeting in Washington, DC Mar 29-31, 2001."

Contents and Abstracts:

http://www.ined.fr/englishversion/publications/population/englishselection/population13.pdf

INED:

http://www.ined.fr/englishversion/index.html

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VI. Funding Opportunities:

26. NIH: "Biology of the Menopausal Process and Associated Conditions During and After Menopause" (US National Institutes of Health, PA-01-067, Mar. 14, 2001).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-067.html

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VII. Legislation Information Updates:

27. US HOUSE COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS:

A. "Social Security and Medicare Trustee's 2001 Annual Reports (Joint Hearing with Senate Committee on Finance)," a hearing held Mar. 20, 2001.

Hearing testimony:

http://waysandmeans.house.gov/fullcomm/107cong/fc-4wit.htm

B. "Medicare Solvency," a hearing held Mar. 20, 2001.

Hearing testimony:

http://waysandmeans.house.gov/fullcomm/107cong/fc-5wit.htm
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28. US SENATE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE: "Prescription Drugs and Medicare Financing," a hearing held Mar. 22, 2001.

Hearing testimony:

http://www.senate.gov/~finance/hr032201.htm

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology and Center for Demography of Health and Aging
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu