Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #72--February 22, 2001

CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar/caar-index.htm

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I. Data:

1. AOA: The US Administration on Aging has released "1998 State Program Reports," which describe "the services provided Title III and VII of the Older Americans Act." Included are national tables and state profile reports (HTML and Microsoft Excel spreadsheet format).

http://www.aoa.dhhs.gov/napis/98spr/default.htm
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2. HRS/AHEAD PRELIMINARY RELEASE DATASETS AND FILES: The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research Health and Retirement Study (HRS)/ Asset and Health Dynamics Among the Oldest Old (AHEAD) website has announced a preliminary dataset and file release. For more information, including caveats, see:

http://www.umich.edu/~hrswww/center/prelim.html

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II. Reports and articles:

3. CENSUS BUREAU COMPENDIUM: _Statistical Abstract of the United States, 2000_ (US Census Bureau, 2001, .pdf format, 999p.). The US Census Bureau has released the 2000 issue of this statistical compendium, featuring 1458 tables of statistical information on various aspects of the US. Tables can be downloaded chapter by chapter and each chapter is identified by its table range. The easiest way to navigate the electronic _SA_ is to use the index as a guide to statistical table numbers and then download/print the chapters with the table numbers of interest. Links are available at the site to _SA_s from 1995-1999, as well as the current issue.

http://www.census.gov/prod/www/statistical-abstract-us.html
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4. DHHS NEWS RELEASE: "HHS Launches National Family Caregiver Program (US Department of Health and Human Services press release, Feb. 15, 2001).

http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2001pres/20010215.html
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5. OBSSR NIH REPORT: "Progress and Promise in Research on the Social and Cultural Dimensions of Health: A Research Agenda (US National Institutes of Health Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, draft report, February 2001, .pdf format, 67p). This is a "draft report summarizing research recommendations from the OBSSR-sponsored conference: "Toward Higher Levels of Analysis: Progress and Promise in Research on Social and Cultural Dimensions of Health," held June 27-28, 2000 at the National Institutes of Health.

http://obssr.od.nih.gov/Conf_Wkshp/higherlevel/conference.html

Click on "Report" in the left frame of the page.
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6. AARP ANNUAL LEGISLATIVE AND PUBLIC POLICY CONFERENCE WEBCAST: "At AARPs Annual Legislative and Public Policy Conference, Feb. 14, 2001, political leaders and policy experts [spoke] on key issues and deliberate[d] the public policy recommendations submitted by the AARP National Legislative Council." The webcast (audio or video, RealPlayer plug-in or helper application required) is provided by the Kaiser Family Foundation. In addition, print transcripts (.pdf format) are available.

http://www.kaisernetwork.org/health_cast/hcast_index.cfm?display=detail&hc=123
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7. RBFG NEWS RELEASE: "Young Canadians Expect To Financially Support Aging Parents: 10th Annual Royal Bank Financial Group RRSP Survey," (Royal Bank Financial Group, Royal Bank of Canada News Release, Feb. 21, 2001).

http://www.royalbank.com/newsroom/20010216survey2.html
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8. _NATURE_ EDITORIAL: "Biomedical boom, forget the rest?" (_Nature, Vol. 409, No 6823, Feb. 22, 2001, p. 965, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v409/n6823/full/409965a0_fs.html
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9. _JAMA_ ARTICLE, ARTICLE ABSTRACT:

A. "Effect of Age and Comorbidity in Postmenopausal Breast Cancer Patients Aged 55 Years and Older," by Rosemary Yancik, Margaret N. Wesley, Lynn A. G. Ries, Richard J. Havlik, Brenda K. Edwards, and Jerome W. Yates (_Journal of the American Medical Association_, Vol. 285, No. 7, February 21, 2001, p. 885-892, HTML and .pdf format). Note: This article is freely available to the public.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/current/rfull/joc00907.html

B. "Hormone Replacement Therapy, Prothrombotic Mutations, and the Risk of Incident Nonfatal Myocardial Infarction in Postmenopausal Women," by Bruce M. Psaty, Nicholas L. Smith, Rozenn N. Lemaitre, Hans L. Vos, Susan R. Heckbert, Andrea Z. LaCroix, and Frits R. Rosendaal (_Journal of the American Medical Association_, Vol. 285, No. 7, February 21, 2001, p. 906-913). Note: Full electronic text (HTML and .pdf format) of this article may be available. Check your organization's library.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/current/abs/jpc90058.html
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10. _BMJ_ NEWS: "Middle aged women more likely to die after heart attack than men," by Scott Gottlieb (_British Medical Journal_ News Roundup, Vol. 322, No. 7283, Feb. 17, 2001, HTML format, p. 384).

http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/322/7283/384/a
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11. _NEJM_ BOOK REVIEW: _The Osteoporosis Primer_, edited by Janet E. Henderson and David Goltzman, reviewed by John A. Kanis (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 344, No. 8, Feb. 22, 2001).

http://www.nejm.org/content/2001/0344/0008/0615.asp
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12. _JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN BOARD OF FAMILY PRACTICE_ VIA MEDSCAPE ARTICLE: Note: Medscape requires free registration before providing articles. "Successful Withdrawal of Thyroid Hormone Therapy in Nursing Home Patients," by Patrick P. Coll and Nicolas N. Abourizk (_Journal of the American Board of Family Practice_, Vol. 13, No. 6, November/December 2000, p. 403-407).

http://www.medscape.com/33904.rhtml?srcmp=ms-021601

or

http://www.medscape.com/ABFP/JABFP/2000/v13.n06/fp1306.03.coll/fp1306.03.coll-01.html
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13. AARP PRIME TIME RADIO: Note: This is an audio transcript and listeners will need the RealPlayer plug-in or helper application to hear it. Jan 16, 2001. "Retire? Or Get a New Job?" "There are still millions of us way over age 40 who still can't answer the question: 'what do you want to do when you grow up?' But midlife offers new opportunities - and a new urgency - to confront that question. Writer and therapist Dorothy Cantor has wonderful advice for late-bloomers trying to decide whether to retire, or get a new career, or a new life! Her book is titled: _What DO You Want To Be When You Grow Up?_ Running time: 30 minutes 9 seconds.

http://www.aarp.org/ontheair/ptrtopics.html

Scroll to 1/30/01 "Retire? Or Get a New Job?"
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14. AARP REPORT: "Exploring Reverse Mortgages" (AARP, 2001). Note: This article is written for a general audience.

http://www.aarp.org/revmort/

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III. Working Papers:

15. NBER: Note: To access the electronic full-text of the working paper click on the "PDF" link or submit your email address at the bottom of the abstract.

A. "Will Bequests Attenuate the Predicted Meltdown in Stock Prices When Baby Boomers Retire?" by Andrew B. Abel (_National Bureau of Economic Research_ Working Paper W8131, February 2001, .pdf format, 16p.).

Abstract:

Jim Poterba finds that consumers do not spend all of their assets during retirement, and he projects that the demand for assets will remain high when the baby boomers retire. Based on his forecast of continued high demand for capital, Poterba rejects the asset market meltdown hypothesis, which predicts a fall in stock prices when the baby boomers retire. I develop a rational expectations general equilibrium model with a bequest motive and an aggregate supply curve for capital. In this model, a baby boom generates an increase in stock prices, and stock prices are rationally anticipated to fall when the baby boomers retire, even though, as emphasized by Poterba, consumers do not spend all of their assets during retirement. This finding contradicts Poterba's conclusion that continued high demand for assets by retired baby boomers will prevent a fall in the price of capital.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W8131

B. "Are For-Profit Hospitals Really Different? Medicare Upcoding and Market Structure," by Elaine Silverman and Jonathan Skinner (_National Bureau of Economic Research_ Working Paper W8133, February 2001, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

How do for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals differ? We consider one dimension: the shifting of a patient's diagnostic related group (DRG) to one that yields a greater reimbursement from the Medicare system, also known as upcoding. It has played a major role in recent federal lawsuits against hospitals and hospital chains, but more importantly provides a valuable window for understanding how for-profit and not-for-profit hospitals make tradeoffs between pecuniary benefits and reputational or penalty costs. Our empirical work focuses primarily on hospital admissions involving pneumonia and respiratory infections; while the two diagnostic categories are often difficult to distinguish from one another, the latter pays about $2000 more to the hospital. Between 1989 and 1996, the incidence of the most expensive DRG (relative to all DRGs for pneumonia and respiratory infections) rose by 10 percentage points among stable not-for-profit hospitals, 23 percent among stable for-profit hospitals, and 37 percentage points among hospitals that had converted to for-profit status. (Since 1996, the upcoding index has dropped significantly in response to adverse publicity and lawsuits.) There is some evidence that not-for-profit hospitals operating in heavily for-profit markets were almost as likely to upcode as their for-profit brethren, as well as for important regional effects.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W8133
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16. IIASA:

A. "Aging in Japan: Causes and Consequences. Part I: Demographic Issues," by David E. Horlacher (International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis [Austria] Interim Report IR-01-008, February 2001, .pdf and PostScript format, 47p.).

Abstract:

This paper reviews demographic issues related to the aging of the population of Japan. Among its findings are: 1) The aging of the Japanese population has little to do with "aging of the baby boom generation" as in countries such as the United States, because the baby boom was only three years long. It is rather, almost entirely due to low fertility; 2) Recent fertility decline in Japan has reflected not so much declining marital fertility as decline in the proportion of women of childbearing age who are married. This is due mostly to rising age at first marriage, although the rising divorce rate also plays a role; 3) Reluctance of young women to marry and raise children can be explained in terms of rising opportunity costs, particularly opportunity costs associated with the labor market. At the same time that costs of childbearing are rising, the benefits appear to be declining. A falling share of women report that they expect to rely on their children for age support and a surprisingly low proportion -- only 9 percent of mothers of 0-14 year olds, as opposed to 40-70 percent in other industrial countries -report that they derive pleasure from child rearing; and, 4) While mortality improvements play a secondary role in population aging (compared to low fertility), they have potentially significant impacts on health care costs and the demand for long-term care.

http://www.iiasa.ac.at/cgi-bin/pubsrch?IR01008

Click on "PDF" or "PS" icon for full text.

B. "Aging in Japan: Causes and Consequences. Part II: Economic Issues," by by David E. Horlacher (International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis [Austria] Interim Report IR-01-009, February 2001, .pdf and PostScript format, 81p.).

Abstract:

This survey reviews current research on the impact of present demographic trends -- population aging combined with slower overall population growth -- on Japan's economic future. Among the conclusions which emerge are the following: 1) The traditional Japanese labor market system of lifetime employment, seniority-based compensation, and mandatory retirement at an early age is already coming under pressure due to aging of the labor force. The opportunity costs of distortions and institutional factors which affect the labor supply of women will rise as labor becomes scarce; 2) Much of the research reviewed here has to do with the relationship between population aging and household savings in Japan. This research has tended (some might say narrowly) to confirm the relevance of the life cycle hypothesis, leading to the conclusion that population aging will reduce the household saving rate. There is unanimity that population aging will negatively affect government balances through the rising system dependency rate of the public pension system and, less significantly, rising health care costs. Thus, all projection exercises studied here have concluded that projected demographic trends will reduce the aggregate saving rate; 3) Much less attention has been devoted to investment than to saving. All projection exercises reviewed here have concluded (or, perhaps more accurately, assumed) that the impact of demographic trends on investment will be less significant than their impact on saving, with the result that the current account surplus will diminish, eventually turning into a deficit; and 4) Pension reform has the potential to defuse the macroeconomic impacts of population aging, however, given the fact that 70 percent of the income of the elderly comes from the public pension system, the distributional impacts are likely to be large. Because four-fifths of public pensions are wage-indexed, pension system contribution rates are are essentially delinked from productivity growth under current arrangements. Another way of looking at this is that, as population aging raises wage rates, pensions rise "pari passu" and contribution rates must rise as well. One of the most crucial steps towards defusing the economic impact of population aging would be to link pensions to prices as opposed to wages.

http://www.iiasa.ac.at/cgi-bin/pubsrch?IR01009

Click on "PDF" or PS" icon for full text.
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17. FUNDACIN DE ESTUDIOS DE ECONOMA APLICADA (SPAIN): "Labor Force Participation and Retirement of Spanish Older Men: Trends and Prospects," by Namkee Ahn and Pedro Mira (FEDEA Working Document 2000-25, December 2000, .pdf format, 22p.).

Abstract:

We report a recent reversal in the steep trend towards lower participation rates of Spanish older men. An analysis of participation rates conditional on age and education reveals that the upturn in the aggregate participation rate of men in ages 55-64 is the result of positive behavioral and composition effects. Our projections predict that the joint composition effect of age and education will contribute an increase of up to 4.5 percentage points to the aggregate participation rate of 55-64 year olds by the year 2020. Non participation is an absorbing state for older men. Thus, lower participation rates of older men reflect a tendency towards earlier retirement. We confirm that transition rates to early retirement have declined during the current expansion.

ftp://ftp.fedea.es/pub/Papers/2000/dt2000-25.pdf

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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

18. American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 153, No. 4, Feb. 15, 2001). Note: Full electronic text (HTML and .pdf format) may be available. Check your organization's library.

http://aje.oupjournals.org/content/vol153/issue4/index.shtml

19. Journal of Marriage and the Family (Vol. 63, No. 1, February 2001). Note 1: Full electronic text (HTML and .pdf format) may be available at the site listed below. Check your organization's library. Note 2: This journal is available in full electronic text in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://ncfr.allenpress.com/ncfronline/?request=get-issue&issn=0022-2445&volume=063&issue=01
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20. CARL Uncover Journal Tables of Contents. Follow the instructions below to access tables of contents. CARL Uncover provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://uncweb.carl.org:80/

B. click on "Search Uncover"
C. click on "Search Uncover Now"
D. Type the Journal Name in the search box and click the radio button"Journal Title Browse"
E. click on the journal name
F. click on "journal issues"
G. click on the issues identified below

International Journal of Aging and Human Development (Vol. 51, No. 2, 2000).

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V. Funding Opportunities:

21. NIH NIA:

A. Obesity, Diabetes and Aging Animal Resource (ODAAR) (US National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health NOT-AG-01-002, Feb. 16, 2001). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-AG-01-002.html

B. International Clinical, Operational and Health Services Research and Training Award (ICOHRTA) (US National Institute on Aging in cooperation with several other agencies, National Institutes of Health TW-01-003, Feb. 13, 2001). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-TW-01-003.html

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VI. Legislation Information Updates:

22. US HOUSE COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE: "Medicare Reform: Providing Prescription Drug Coverage for Seniors," a hearing held Feb. 15, 2001. Note: In addition to selected testimony transcripts, an audio transcript of this hearing is available at the site. Users will need the RealPlayer plug-in or helper application to hear it. Running Time: 1 hour, 20 minutes, 6 seconds.

http://www.house.gov/commerce/hearings/health02152001.htm
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23. US SENATE BUDGET COMMITTEE: "Medicare Reform and Prescription Drugs," a hearing held Feb. 15, 2001.

http://www.senate.gov/~budget/republican/about/hearing2001/2001_hearings.htm

Scroll to "Feb. 15".

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VII. Websites of Interest:

24. NCHS DATA WEBSITE: "State Health Statistics by Sex and Race/Ethnicity," (National Center for Health Statistics). This data extraction system uses "Beyond 20/20" extraction software (which can be downloaded to the desktop or can be used directly with the Web in an"expedited query system," to "describe the health of people in each state by sex, race, age, and year." Data is available for "mortality" and"health behaviors and risk factors" at this time. Note that the "health behaviors and risk factors" data is only available with software that must be downloaded to the desktop at this time."

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/datawh/statab/tables.htm
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25. KFF/ROPER CENTER HEALTH POLL SEARCH: The Roper Center and Kaiser Family Foundation have opened this website, "a searchable archive of public opinion questions on health issues that allows users to know what Americans think about health issues, as well as what Americans have thought about health issues over time.... The Health Poll Search archive holds approximately 40,000 questions on health issues such as Medicare, Medicaid, the uninsured, women's health, and HIV/AIDS. Response percentages and source information are provided for all questions."

http://www.kaisernetwork.org/health_poll/
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26. MEDSCAPE RESOURCE CENTER WEBSITE UPDATE: Note: Medscape requires free registration before providing content. Medscape has updated the "Geriatric Care" section of its Resource Center. The meta-page contains links to news and information on the topic.

http://www.medscape.com/33661.rhtml?srcmp=ms-021601

or

http://www.medscape.com/Medscape/features/ResourceCenter/Geriatric/public/RC-Index-Geriatric.html

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology and Center for Demography of Health and Aging
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu