Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #504 -- September 17, 2009

CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar.html

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I. Data:

1. US CENTERS FOR MEDICARE AND MEDICAID SERVICES: "Medicare and Medicaid Statistical Supplement" Update: The following tables (.pdf and .zip compressed .pdf format) have been updated:

Figure 8.1 Medicare Hospice

Figures 5.1-5.8 Medicare Short-Stay Hospital

Figures 9.1-9.10 Medicare Physician Services

Figures 10.1-10.2 Medicare Hospital Outpatient Services

Medicare Hospital Outpatient Services (Tables 10.1-10.5)

Medicare Physician Services (Tables 9.1-9.9)

Medicare Hospices (Tables 8.1-8.3)

Medicare Home Health Agencies (Tables 7.1-7.7)

Medicare Skilled Nursing Facilities (Tables 6.1-6.9)

Medicare Short-Stay Hospitals (Tables 5.1-5.12)

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/MedicareMedicaidStatSupp/LT/list.asp?filterType=none&filterByDID=0&sortByDID=2&sortOrder=descending&intNumPerPage=10

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2. MISSOURI STATE DATA CENTER POPULATION ESTIMATES BY AGE UPDATE: "Population Estimates by Age: With Detail by "Bridged" Race, Hispanic Origin and Gender 1990 to 2008 for U.S. States and Counties" (September 2009, HTML, comma separated value [.csv] and SAS format).

http://mcdc.missouri.edu/websas/estimates_by_age.shtml

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II. Reports and articles:

3. US NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEATLH NEWS RELEASE: "Scientists Identify Two Gene Variants Associated with Alzheimer's Risk" (Sep. 6, 2009).

http://www.nih.gov/news/health/sep2009/nia-06.htm

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4. MORBIDITY AND MORTALITY WEEKLY REPORT ARTICLE: "Nonfatal Scald-Related Burns Among Adults Aged >=65 Years --- United States, 2001--2006" (US Centers for Disease Control, Vol. 58, No. 36, Sep. 18, 2009, HTML and .pdf format, p. 993-996).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5836a1.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5836.pdf

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5. US SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, OFFICE OF POLICY REPORTS:

A. "International Update, September 2009" (HTML and .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/progdesc/intl_update/2009-09/index.html

B. "SSI (Supplemental Security Income) Monthly Statistics, August 2009" (September 2009, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/statcomps/ssi_monthly/2009-08/index.html

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6. US DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL REPORTS:

A. "Medicare Hospice Care for Beneficiaries in Nursing Facilities: Compliance With Medicare Coverage Requirements" (OEI-02-06-00221, September 2009, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

We found that 82 percent of hospice claims for beneficiaries in nursing facilities did not meet at least one Medicare coverage requirement. Medicare paid approximately $1.8 billion for these claims. More specifically, 33 percent of claims did not meet election requirements, and 63 percent did not meet plan of care requirements. For 31 percent of claims, hospices provided fewer services than outlined in beneficiaries' plans of care. In addition, 4 percent of claims did not meet certification of terminal illness requirements.

The Medicare hospice benefit allows a beneficiary with a terminal illness to forgo curative treatment for the illness and instead receive palliative care, which is the relief of pain and other uncomfortable symptoms.

Based on the findings in this report, we recommend that CMS educate hospices about the coverage requirements and their importance in ensuring quality of care. We also recommend that CMS provide tools and guidance to help hospices meet the coverage requirements and that it strengthen its monitoring practices regarding hospice claims. CMS concurred with all our recommendations.

This report is one in a series of four OIG reports that examine the hospice benefit for nursing facility residents. It is based on data from a medical record review of a stratified random sample of hospice claims for beneficiaries in nursing facilities in 2006.

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-02-06-00221.pdf

B. "Medicare Hospice Care: Services Provided to Beneficiaries Residing in Nursing Facilities" (OEI-02-06-00223, September 2009, .pdf format, 15p.).

Abstract:

In 2006, 31 percent of Medicare hospice beneficiaries resided in nursing facilities. Medicare paid $2.59 billion for their hospice care, at an average of $960 per week for each beneficiary. Hospices most commonly provided nursing, home health aide, and medical social services. They furnished an average of 4.2 visits per week per beneficiary for these three services combined. They also commonly provided drugs.

The Medicare hospice benefit allows a beneficiary with a terminal illness to forgo curative treatment for the illness and instead receive palliative care, which is the relief of pain and other uncomfortable symptoms. Medicare spending on hospice care and the number of beneficiaries receiving it have increased significantly in recent years. Previous Office of Inspector General (OIG) work has raised questions about the hospice benefit for nursing facility residents. However, little subsequent research has been done to examine hospice care for these beneficiaries and almost no beneficiary-specific data exist.

This memorandum report found that hospices provided nursing services to beneficiaries for 96 percent of claims, home health aide services for 73 percent of claims, and medical social services for 68 percent of claims. Drugs were provided to beneficiaries for 96 percent of claims. In addition, nursing services were provided at an average of 1.7 times per week, home health aide services at an average of 2.2 times per week, and medical social services at an average of 1.7 times per month.

This memorandum report is one in a series of four reports prepared by OIG that examine the hospice benefit for nursing facility residents. It is based on data from a medical record review of a stratified random sample of hospice claims for beneficiaries in nursing facilities in 2006. The report also uses claims data for all Medicare beneficiaries who received hospice care in 2006.

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-02-06-00223.pdf

C. "Medicare Part D Reconciliation Payments for 2006 and 2007" (OEI-02-08-00460, September 2009, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

We found that Part D sponsors owe a net total of $18 million to Medicare for the 2007 Part D payment reconciliation, which is significantly less than the net total of $4.4 billion that sponsors owed for 2006. Despite this improvement, sponsors continue to submit inaccurate bids and make large unexpected profits.

CMS makes monthly prospective payments to sponsors for providing prescription drug coverage to Medicare beneficiaries. These payments are based on estimates that sponsors provide in their bids prior to the beginning of the plan year. After the close of the plan year, CMS reconciles these payments with the sponsors' actual costs to determine whether sponsors owe money to Medicare or Medicare owes money to sponsors.

More specifically, sponsors owe Medicare a net total of $600 million because of unexpected profits or losses that triggered risk sharing for 2007. Many of these sponsors overestimated the costs of providing the benefit in their bids. As a result, Medicare payments to sponsors and beneficiary premiums were higher than necessary. Medicare recoups a portion of these higher payments. However, beneficiaries do not directly recoup any of the money that they paid in higher premiums. At the same time, sponsors will receive a net total of $406 million from Medicare for the low-income cost-sharing subsidy and a net total of $186 million for the reinsurance subsidy because they underestimated these costs in their bids.

Further, sponsors continue to make large unexpected profits. Based on our calculations, the 179 sponsors that had profits large enough to trigger risk sharing made at least $1.02 billion in unexpected profits in 2007. These sponsors owe a portion of these unexpected profits to Medicare based on the risk-sharing requirements. In addition, sponsors included an estimated $1.07 billion of expected profits in their bids.

Finally, for 2006, CMS collected almost all of the funds that sponsors owed to Medicare in November and December 2007. However, CMS has not collected a total of $14 million from five sponsors for 2006.

Based on these findings, we recommend that CMS should: (1) ensure that sponsors' bids more accurately reflect their costs of providing the benefit to Medicare beneficiaries, (2) hold sponsors more accountable for inaccuracies in the bids, (3) determine whether changes to the risk corridors are appropriate, (4) determine whether alternative methodologies would better align payments with sponsors' costs for the low-income cost-sharing and reinsurance subsidies, and (5) follow up with the sponsors that owe funds for 2006. CMS concurred or agreed with three of our recommendations but did not state whether it concurred with our second or third recommendations.

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-02-08-00460.pdf

D. "IHS Contract Health Services Program: Overpayments and Potential Savings" (OEI-05-08-00410, September 2009, .pdf format, 26p.)

Abstract:

IHS and tribes paid above the Medicare rate for 22 percent of hospital claims. As a result, IHS and tribes overpaid $1 million for hospital claims between January and March 2008. Pursuant to the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) and its implementing regulations, all Medicare-participating hospitals must accept reimbursement no greater than the Medicare rate as payment in full for patients eligible for Contract Health Services (CHS). Nonhospital providers, including physicians, are not covered by the MMA provision.

If IHS and tribal payments for nonhospital claims were capped at the Medicare rate, IHS and tribes could have saved as much as $13 million between January and March 2008. Savings from claims over the Medicare rate could have paid for approximately 41,000 additional nonhospital claims between January and March 2008 that might otherwise have been deferred or denied. IHS and tribes paid above Medicare rates for 71 percent of nonhospital claims, most of which were for physician services.

We recommend that IHS and tribes take appropriate action regarding overpaid CHS hospital claims. IHS should also direct its fiscal intermediary to ensure that all future CHS claims are paid at or below the Medicare rate. IHS should provide technical assistance to tribes to ensure proper payments of hospital claims. Lastly, IHS should seek legislative authority to cap payments for CHS nonhospital services. IHS concurred with all four of our recommendations.

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-05-08-00410.pdf

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7. US DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES NEWS RELEASE: "Secretary Sebelius Announces Medicare to Join State-Based Healthcare Delivery System Reform Initiatives" (Sep. 16, 2009).

http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2009pres/09/20090916a.html

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8. US CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE REPORT: "Will the Demand for Assets Fall When the Baby Boomers Retire?" (September 2009, .pdf format, 25p.).

http://www.cbo.gov/doc.cfm?index=10526

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9. US CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE REPORT: "Pension Sponsorship and Participation: Summary of Recent Trends," by Patrick Purcell (RL30122, September 2009, .pdf format, 17p.). Links to a summary and full text are available at:

http://opencrs.com/document/RL30122/

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10. US GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE REPORTS:

A. "Social Security Disability: Additional Performance Measures and Better Cost Estimates Could Help Improve SSA's Efforts to Eliminate Its Hearings Backlog," (GAO-09-398 September 2009, HTML and .pdf format, 65p.).

http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-09-398

B. "Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation: More Strategic Approach Needed for Processing Complex Plans Prone to Delays and Overpayments" (GAO-09-716, August 2009, HTML and .pdf format, 85p.).

http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-09-716

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11. US ADMINISTRATION ON AGING NEWSLETTER: The latest issue (September 2009, Microsoft Word format, 11p.) is available at:

http://www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/Press_Room/Enews/index.aspx

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12. US AGENCY FOR HEALTHCARE RESEARCH AND QUALITY, HEALTHCARE COST AND UTILIZATION PROJECT STATISTICAL BRIEF: "Hospital Utilization among Near-Elderly Adults, Ages 55 to 64 Years, 2007," by Allison Russo, Lauren M. Wier, and Anne Elixhauser (Statistical Brief No. 79, September 2009, .pdf and HTML format, 15p.).

HTML:

http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/statbriefs/sb79.jsp

.pdf:

http://www.hcup-us.ahrq.gov/reports/statbriefs/sb79.pdf

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13. NEBRASKA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REPORT: "Older Adult Fall Injury Fact Sheet," (September 2009, .pdf format, 1p.).

http://www.hhs.state.ne.us/codes/OlderAdultFallInjuries.pdf

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14. AUSTRALIAN INSTITUTE OF HEALTH AND WELFARE REPORT: "Health expenditure for arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions, 2004-05" (Arthritis series no. 10, September 2009, Rich Text and .pdf format, 80p.).

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10699

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15. AUSTRALIAN DEPARTMENT FOR HEALTH AND AGEING NEWS RELEASE: "2.3 Million Dollars to Help People in ACT Remain Independent, in their Home and in their Community" (Sep. 14, 2009, HTML and .pdf format, 2p.).

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/ministers/publishing.nsf/Content/mr-yr09-je-je105.htm

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16. PARLIMENTARY LIBRARY OF AUSTRALIA REPORT: "Superannuation, 2009-2010," by Leslie Nielson (Research Paper No. 04, September 2009, .pdf format, 31p.).

http://www.aph.gov.au/library/pubs/rp/2009-10/10rp04.pdf

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17. UK HOUSE OF COMMONS PUBLIC ACCOUNTS COMMITTEE REPORT: "Supporting Carers to Care" (September 2009, .pdf format, 28p.).

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200809/cmselect/cmpubacc/549/549.pdf

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18. STATISTICS NETHERLANDS ARTICLE: "Growing number of AOW recipients settle abroad," (Sept. 8, 2009).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/arbeid-sociale-zekerheid/publicaties/artikelen/archief/2009/2009-2876-wm.htm

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19. AMERICA'S HEALTH INSURANCE PLANS REPORT: "Low-Income and Minority Beneficiaries In Medicare Advantage Plans, 2007," September 2009, .pdf format, 30p.).

http://www.ahipresearch.org/pdfs/MALowIncomeMinorityReport2009_09-02-09.pdf

More information about AHIP:

http://www.ahip.org/content/default.aspx?bc=31

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20. BOSTON COLLEGE CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH ISSUE BRIEF: "Older Americans On The Go: Financial and Psychological Effects of Moving," by Esteban Calvo, Kelly Haverstick, and Natalia A. Zhivan (IB# 9-19, September 2009, .pdf format, 12p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://crr.bc.edu/briefs/older_americans_on_the_go_financial_and_psychological_effects_of_moving.html

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21. CENTER ON BUDGET AND POLICY PRIORITIES REPORT: "Ending Medicare Advantage Overpayments Would Strengthen Medicare," by January Angeles (September 2009, HTML and .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=2917

More information on CBPP:

http://www.cbpp.org/about/

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22. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT RESEARCH INSTITUTE PERIODICAL: _EBRI Notes_ (Vol. 30, No. 9, September 2009, .pdf format, 20p.). The articles in this issue are: "Trends in Satisfaction and Confidence in Health Care, by Insurance and Health Status: Findings from the 2009 EBRI/MGA Health Confidence Survey 2009," by Paul Fronstin; "Social Security Reform: How Different Options Might Affect Future Funding," by Craig Copeland.

http://www.ebri.org/publications/notes/index.cfm?fa=notesDisp&content_id=4354

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23. URBAN INSTITUTE REPORT, UPDATED REPORT:

A. "Structuring, Financing and Paying for Effective Chronic Care Coordination," by Robert A. Berenson and Julianne Howell (July 2009, .pdf format, 32p.).

http://www.urban.org/publications/1001316.html

B. "Unemployment Statistics on Older Americans: Updated, 9/09," by Richard W. Johnson and Corina Mommaerts (September 2009, .pdf format, 11p.).

http://www.urban.org/publications/411904.html

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24. AARP REPORT:

"2009 Best Employers For Workers Over 50," (September 2009).

http://www.aarp.org/money/work/best_employers/best_employers_list_2009/

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25. NATURE MEDICINE LETTER ABSTRACT: "Syndecan-4 regulates ADAMTS-5 activation and cartilage breakdown in osteoarthritis," by Frank Echtermeyer, Jessica Bertrand, Rita Dreier, Ingmar Meinecke, Katja Neugebauer, Martin Fuerst, Yun Jong Lee, Yeong Wook Song, Christine Herzog, Gregor Theilmeier, and Thomas Pap (Vol. 15, No. 9, September 2009, p. 1072-1076).

http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v15/n9/abs/nm.1998.html

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26. PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE (PLOS) MEDICINE ARTICLE: "Inflammatory Markers and Poor Outcome after Stroke: A Prospective Cohort Study and Systematic Review of Interleukin-6," by William Whiteley, Caroline Jackson, Steff Lewis, Gordon Lowe, Ann Rumley, Peter Sandercock, Joanna Wardlaw, Martin Dennis, and Cathie Sudlow (PLoS Med 6(9): e1000145. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000145, XML, HTML, and .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1000145

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27. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES ARTICLE. ARTICLE ABSTRACT:

A. "Unexpected expression of {alpha}- and {beta}-globin in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons and glial cells," by Marta Biagioli, Milena Pinto, Daniela Cesselli, Marta Zaninello, Dejan Lazarevic, Paola Roncaglia, Roberto Simone, Christina Vlachouli, Charles Plessy, Nicolas Bertin, Antonio Beltrami, Kazuto Kobayashi, Vittorio Gallo, Claudio Santoro, Isidro Ferrer, Stefano Rivella, Carlo Alberto Beltrami, Piero Carninci, Elio Raviola, and Stefano Gustincich (Vol. 106, No. 36, Sep. 8, 2009, HTML and .pdf format, p. 15454-15459). This article is available free of charge.

http://www.pnas.org/content/106/36/15454.abstract?etoc

B. "Reelin signaling antagonizes {beta}-amyloid at the synapse," by Murat S. Durakoglugil, Ying Chen, Charles L. White, Ege T. Kavalali, and Joachim Herz (Vol. 106, No. 37, Sep. 15, 2009, P. 15938-15943).

http://www.pnas.org/content/106/37/15938.abstract?etoc

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28. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION ARTICLE ABSTRACT: "Outcomes of Localized Prostate Cancer Following Conservative Management," by Grace L. Lu-Yao, Peter C. Albertsen, Dirk F. Moore, Weichung Shih, Yong Lin, Robert S. DiPaola, Michael J. Barry, Anthony Zietman, Michael OíLeary, Elizabeth Walker-Corkery, and Siu-Long Yao (Clinician's Corner, Vol. 302, No. 11, Sep. 16, 2009, p. 1202-1209).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/302/11/1202

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29. BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL ARTICLE: "Lifestyle interventions for knee pain in overweight and obese adults aged >=45: economic evaluation of randomised controlled trial," by Garry R. Barton, Tracey H. Sach, Claire Jenkinson, Michael Doherty, Anthony J. Avery, and Kenneth R. Muir (BMJ 2009;339:b2273, Vol. 339, Sep. 12, 2009, HTML and .pdf format, p. 606-619). This article is available free of charge.

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/339/aug18_2/b2273

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III. Working Papers:

30. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN POPULATION STUDIES CENTER: "Return Migration and the Health of Older Aged Parents: Evidence from Rural Thailand," by Zachary S. Zimmer and John E. Knodel (PSC Research Report No. 09-689, September 2009, .pdf format, 20p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs/5992

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31. NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH:

A. "The Efficiency of Sponsor and Participant Portfolio Choices in 401(k) Plans," by Ning Tang, Olivia S. Mitchell, Gary R. Mottola, and Stephen Utkus (w15307, September 2009, .pdf format, 50p.).

Abstract:

This paper develops a consumption and portfolio-choice model of a retiree who allocates wealth in four asset classes: a riskless bond, a risky asset, a real annuity, and housing. The retiree chooses health expenditure endogenously in response to stochastic depreciation of health. The model is calibrated to explain the joint dynamics of health expenditure, health, and asset allocation for retirees in the Health and Retirement Study, aged 65 and older. The calibrated model is used to assess the welfare gain from private annuitization. The welfare gain ranges from 13 percent of wealth at age 65 for those in worst health, to 18 percent for those in best health.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w15307

B. "Genetic Adverse Selection: Evidence from Long-Term Care Insurance and Huntington Disease," by Emily Oster, Ira Shoulson, Kimberly Quaid, and E. Ray Dorsey (w15326, September 2009, .pdf format, 50p.).

Abstract:

Individual, personalized genetic information is increasingly available, leading to the possibility of greater adverse selection over time, particularly in individual-payer insurance markets; this selection could impact the viability of these markets. We use data on individuals at risk for Huntington disease (HD), a degenerative neurological disorder with significant effects on morbidity, to estimate adverse selection in long-term care insurance. We find strong evidence of adverse selection: individuals who carry the HD genetic mutation are up to 5 times as likely as the general population to own long-term care insurance. We use these estimates to make predictions about the future of this market as genetic information increases. We argue that even relatively limited increases in genetic information may threaten the viability of private long-term care insurance.

http://www.nber.org/papers/w15326

C. "Insurer Bargaining and Negotiated Drug Prices in Medicare Part D," by Darius Lakdawalla and Wesley Yin (w15330, September 2009, .pdf format, 49p.).

Abstract:

A controversial feature of Medicare Part D is its reliance on private insurers to negotiate drug prices and rebates with retail pharmacies and drug manufacturers. Central to this controversy is whether increases in market power--an undesirable feature in most settings--confer benefits in health insurance markets, where larger buyers may obtain better prices for their members. We test whether insurers that experience larger enrollment increases due to Part D negotiate lower drug prices with pharmacies. Overall, we find that 100,000 additional insureds lead to 2.5-percent lower pharmacy prices negotiated by the insurer, and 5-percent reductions in pharmacy profits earned on prescriptions filled by enrollees of that insurer. Estimated enrollment effects are much larger for drugs with therapeutic substitutes, and virtually zero for branded drugs without therapeutic substitutes. We also present evidence that most insurer savings are, on the margin, passed on as lower premiums. Out-of-sample estimation suggests that modest insurer consolidation would generate significant savings to Medicare, along with premium reductions and enrollment increases. Finally, we find that greater enrollment leads to lower pharmacy prices negotiated by insurers for their non-Part D market--an external benefit to the commercially enrolled associated with administering Part D through private insurers.

http://www.nber.org/papers/w15330

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32. BOSTON COLLEGE CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH: "The Asset and Income Profile of Residents in Seniors Care Communities," by Norma B. Coe and Melissa Boyle (WP#2009-20, September 2009, .pdf format, 32p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://crr.bc.edu/working_papers/the_asset_and_income_profile_of_residents_in_seniors_care_communities.html

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33. INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF LABOR (IZA) [UNIVERSITY OF BONN, GERMANY]: "Labour Supply Effects of a Subsidised Old-Age Part-Time Scheme in Austria," by Nikolaus Graf, Helmut Hofer, Rudolf Winter-Ebmer (Discussion Paper No. 4239, June 2009, .pdf format, 19p.). Links to the abstract and full-text can be found at:

http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/papers/viewAbstract?dp_id=4239

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34. CENTER FOR ECONOMIC STUDIES/Ifo INSTITUTE FOR ECONOMIC RESEARCH (CESifo) [UNIVERSITY OF BONN, GERMANY]:

A. "Eliciting Individual Preferences for Pension Reform," by Yosr Abid Fourati and Cathal O'Donoghue (WP 2770, August 2009, .pdf format, 30p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/ifoHome/b-publ/b3publwp/_wp_abstract?p_file_id=16943

B. "Social Security Reform and Temptation," by Cagri Seda Kumru and Athanasios C. Thanopoulos (WP 2778, September 2009, .pdf format, 24p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/ifoHome/b-publ/b3publwp/_wp_abstract?p_file_id=16989

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35. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC DIMENSIONS OF AN AGING POPULATION (SEDAP) [MC MASTER UNIVERSITY, HAMILTON, ONTARIO, CANADA]:

A. "International Differences in Longevity and Health and their Economic Consequences," by P.-C. Michaud, D. Goldman, D. Lakdawalla, A. Gailey, and Y. Zheng (SEDAP Working Paper No. 254, September 2009, .pdf format, 42p.).

Abstract:

In 1975, 50 year-old Americans could expect to live slightly longer than their European counterparts. By 2005, American life expectancy at that age has diverged substantially compared to Europe. We find that this growing longevity gap is primarily the symptom of real declines in the health of near-elderly Americans, relative to their European peers. In particular, we use a microsimulation approach to project what US longevity would look like, if US health trends approximated those in Europe. We find that differences in health can explain most of the growing gap in remaining life expectancy. In addition, we quantify the public finance consequences of this deterioration in health. The model predicts that gradually moving American cohorts to the health status enjoyed by Europeans could save up to $1.1 trillion in discounted total health expenditures from 2004 to 2050.

http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/sedap/p/sedap254.pdf

B. "Understanding the Economic Consequences of Shifting Trends in Population Health," by P.-C. Michaud, D. Goldman, D. Lakdawalla, Y. Zheng, and A. Gailey (SEDAP Working Paper No. 255, September 2009, .pdf format, 48p.).

Abstract:

The public economic burden of shifting trends in population health remains uncertain. Sustained increases in obesity, diabetes, and other diseases could reduce life expectancy - with a concomitant decrease in the public-sectors annuity burden - but these savings may be offset by worsening functional status, which increases health care spending, reduces labor supply, and increases public assistance. Using a microsimulation approach, we quantify the competing public-finance consequences of shifting trends in population health for medical care costs, labor supply, earnings, wealth, tax revenues, and government expenditures (including Social Security and income assistance). Together, the reduction in smoking and the rise in obesity have increased net public-sector liabilities by $430bn, or approximately 4% of the current debt burden. Larger effects are observed for specific public programs: annual spending is 10% higher in the Medicaid program, and 7% higher for Medicare.

http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/sedap/p/sedap255.pdf

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36. CENTRE D'ETUDES DE POPULATIONS, DE PAUVRETET DE POLITIQUES SOCIO-ECONOMIQUES / INTERNATIONAL NETWORK FOR STUDIES IN TECHNOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT, ALTERNATIVES, DEVELOPMENT--INTEGRATED RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURE IN THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC SCIENCES (CEPS/INSTEAD--IRISS) [DIFFERDANGE, LUXEMBOURG]: "Intergenerational Transmission of Inflation Aversion: Theory and Evidence," by Etienne Farvaque and Alexander Mihailov (WP 2009-11, September 2009, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

This paper studies the transmission of preferences in an overlapping-generations model with heterogeneous mature agents characterized by different degrees of inflation aversion. We show how the dynamics of a societyís degree of inflation aversion and the implied degree of central bank independence depend on the direction and speed of changes in the structure of the populationís preferences, themselves a function of parent socialization efforts in response to observed inflation. We then construct a survey-based measure of inflation aversion and provide empirical support for our analytical and simulation results. Available cross-section evidence confirms that a nationís demographic structure, in particular variation in the share of retirees as a proxy for the more inflation averse type, is a key determinant of inflation aversion, together with experience with past inflation and the resulting collective memory embodied in monetary institutions.

http://www.ceps.lu/pdf/11/art1448.pdf?CFID=324399&CFTOKEN=41134147&jsessionid=843057a81d96e12f8dcc7156f451b5756728

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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

37. Alzheimer's and Dementia (Vol. 5, No. 5, September 2009).

http://www.alzheimersanddementia.org/issues/contents?issue_key=S1552-5260(09)X0006-3

38. American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 99, No. 10, October 2009).

http://www.ajph.org/content/vol99/issue10/?etoc

39. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics (Vol. 49, No. 3, November-December 2009).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/01674943

40. Journal of Applied Gerontology (Vol. 28, No. 5, October 2009).

http://jag.sagepub.com/content/vol28/issue5/?etoc

41. Omega: Journal of Death and Dying (Vol. 59, No. 4, 2009).

http://baywood.metapress.com/

Search for "Omega" as a "Publication"

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42. AMEDEO MEDICAL LITERATURE: Note: "AMEDEO has been created to serve the needs of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, other members of the health professions, and patients and their friends. They can easily access timely, relevant information within their respective fields... All AMEDEO services are free of charge. This policy was made possible thanks to generous unrestricted educational grants provided by AMGEN, Berlex, Eisai, Glaxo Wellcome, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Schering AG."

A. Osteoporosis: Literature for the week of Sep. 7,14 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ost.htm

B. Alzheimer's Disease: Literature for the week of Sep. 7,14, 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ad.htm

C. Parkinson's Disease: Literature for the week of Sep. 7,14, 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/pd.htm

D. Prostate Cancer: Literature for the week of Sep. 7,14, 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/prc.htm

E. Stem Cell Research: Literature for the week of Sep. 7,14, 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/stc.htm

F. Ophthalmology: Literature for the week of Sep. 7,14, 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/eye.htm

AMEDEO Literature Guide:

http://www.amedeo.com/index.htm

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V. Funding Opportunities/Employment Opportunities:

43. US NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH: "Recovery Act Limited Competition: Academic Research Enhancement Award (R15)," (RFA-OD-09-007, National Institute on Aging, April 24, 2009).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-OD-09-007.html

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44. BOSTON COLLEGE CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH: The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College (CRR) currently has job openings for a research economist and a research associate (see descriptions below).  Individuals can apply by e-mailing a cover letter and resume to Tim Garufi, CRR Associate Director for Administration, at:

garufi@bc.edu

A. Research Economist

Job Description

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College is seeking a Research Economist to develop and conduct a variety of research projects on issues relating to retirement income, such as Social Security, employer-provided pensions, household saving, and labor force issues concerning older workers.†The Center was created in 1998 through a grant from the Social Security Administration (SSA) to promote research on retirement issues and transmit the findings to policy makers, the research community, and the public.

The Research Economist will have primary responsibility for conducting and completing specific projects and will also assist on other projects as needed.†Specifically, the Research Economist will develop research proposals, conduct quantitative research using micro datasets such as the Health and Retirement Study and the Survey of Consumer Finances, monitor the work of research assistants, and produce papers and other written products, such as issue briefs, in response to specific deadlines. The Research Economist will present research results at conferences and other forums.†The Research Economist will also be involved in identifying opportunities for research funding and completing proposals to attract funding from government, corporate, and foundation sources.

Requirements

The ideal candidate would have a Ph.D. in Economics, with 3 years or more of experience and familiarity to retirement issues.†We are looking for someone who is well organized and detail oriented, skilled at juggling multiple assignments, has exceptional research and analytical skills, and exceptional writing and communication skills.†Some travel is required. Salary is dependent upon experience.

B. Research Associate

Job Description

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College is seeking a full-time Research Associate.†The Research Associate will be involved in the various research activities at the Center.†This involves contributing to research papers, producing descriptive statistics, drafting research summaries, helping prepare presentations, and responding to informational queries.†The Research Associate will work under the direction of the Center Director and the Associate Director for Research.†The Research Associate will also assist overseeing the day to day assignments of student research assistants.

Requirements:

The Center is looking for someone who is well organized and detail oriented, has strong research and analytical skills, as well as strong writing and communication skills. Experience working with micro data and some knowledge of econometrics and statistical packages, such as Stata and Matlab is also desirable.†Candidates with a bachelor's degree as well as graduating seniors are strongly encouraged to apply.

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45. AGEWORK.COM: Agework has updated its employment page with listings through Sep. 17, 2009.

http://agework.geron.org/c/search_results.cfm?site_id=312

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VI. Conferences:

46. WISCONSIN LONGITUDINAL STUDY: "WLS research to be presented at Gerontological Society of America Meetings," (November 19, 2009).

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/wlsresearch/WLSatGSA09.pdf

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47. CONFERENCEALERTS.COM UPDATES: Conferencealerts Gerontology section has recently added the following new conferences:

Sep. 24, 2009: Geriatric Challenges 2009, Lake Louise, Alberta, Canada

Sep. 30, 2009: Caring for Older People in the Home, Salford, UK

Oct. 7, 2009: Living in an Ageing Society, Wellington, New Zealand

Oct. 9, 2009: Fundraising & Communications Training for NGO and CSR, Mumbai, India

Oct. 28, 2009: 4th World Congress on Mental Health and Deafness, Brisbane, Australia

Jan. 20, 2010: 13th Bangkok International Symposium on Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand

Conference Alerts Gerontology:

http://www.conferencealerts.com/aging.htm

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VII. Websites of Interest:

48. MEDICARE.GOV SITE UPDATES. Medicare.gov updated the following sites on Sept. 10, 2009: "Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Finder," "Medicare Options Compare," and "Hospital Compare."

http://www.medicare.gov/Updates.asp

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49. OLDER DOMINION PARTNERSHIP: "The Older Dominion Partnership (ODP) is a non-profit initiative by Virginia businesses, government, foundations, and non-profits to help Virginia ride the age wave -- the doubling of the Commonwealth's 65+ year old population from ~900,000 today to over ~1.8 million by 2030." ODP is designed to provide links to information about aging related issues.

http://www.olderdominion.org/

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It is not by muscle, speed, or physical dexterity that great things are achieved, but by reflection, force of character, and judgement; and in these qualities old age is usually not only not poorer, but is even richer

Cicero--106-43 B.C.

===================================================

Jack Solock
Director--Data and Information Services Center
Social Sciences Research Services
3313 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu
http://www.disc.wisc.edu/
http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/cssrindex.html
http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/pubs/caar/back_iss.html