Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #498 -- July 30, 2009

CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar.html

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I. Data:

1. HEALTH AND RETIREMENT SURVEY: The University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research HRS has announced "HRS ADAMS 1 data (Early, Version 5.0)" (Jul. 24, 2009).

http://hrsonline.isr.umich.edu/news/index.php?p=shownews3x1&hfyle=news267

Data access:

http://hrsonline.isr.umich.edu/index.php?p=data

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2. INTER-UNIVERSITY CONSORTIUM FOR POLITICAL AND SOCIAL RESEARCH: "ICPSR at the University of Michigan has released: "Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS), 1998-2007"

http://dx.doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR23380

Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

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II. Reports and articles:

3. US SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION POLICY BRIEF, RESEARCH AND STATISTICS NOTE:

A. "Distributional Effects of Raising the Social Security Taxable Maximum," by Kevin Whitman (Policy Brief No. 09-1, July 2009, HTML and .pdf format, 7p.).

HTML:

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/policybriefs/pb2009-01.html

.pdf:

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/policybriefs/pb2009-01.pdf

B. "Access Restrictions and Confidentiality Protections in the Health and Retirement Study," by Lionel P. Deang and Paul S. Davies (Research and Statistics Note No. 2009-01, July 2009, HTML and .pdf format, 9p.).

HTML:

http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/rsnotes/rsn2009-01.html

.pdf:

http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/rsnotes/rsn2009-01.pdf

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4. US CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE REPORT: "Approaches for Giving the President Broad Authority to Change Medicare: Letter to the Honorable Steny H. Hoyer" (July 2009, .pdf format, 8p.).

http://www.cbo.gov/doc.cfm?index=10480

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5. US DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES, OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL REPORT: "Part B Services During Non-Part A Nursing Home Stays: Durable Medical Equipment" (OEI-06-07-00100, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

This report presents findings based on our review of Part B durable medical equipment (DME) payments during non-Part A nursing home stays in 2006. This report stems from the Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP Benefits Improvement and Protection Act of 2000, which mandates OIG to monitor Medicare Part B payments during non-Part A nursing home stays. Several ongoing studies are addressing other vulnerable Part B payment areas (e.g., psychotherapy and enteral nutrition therapy).

We found that $30 million was inappropriately allowed for DME during non-Part A skilled nursing facility (SNF) stays, most of which were also certified by Medicaid. Also, we found that nearly $11.9 million more was inappropriately allowed by Part B during Medicaid nursing facility (NF) stays and distinct part nursing home stays providing primarily skilled care. Further, CMS and States reported that they do not maintain a primary level of care designation for nursing homes that could facilitate accurate claim submission by suppliers and proper claim adjudication by payment contractors.

Medicare Part A covers nursing home care for up to 100 days in a SNF. If nursing home care is still needed after the 100 days or the beneficiary did not qualify for a Part A SNF stay, Medicare Part B may provide coverage for certain medical and other health services. In these situations, the stays are termed non-Part A nursing home stays. However, Part B does not pay for DME unless the nursing home qualifies as a beneficiary's home. Because most nursing homes provide primarily skilled care or rehabilitation, they are excluded from qualifying as a beneficiary's home. Only a small number of nursing homes certified only for Medicaid, called NFs, or distinct parts of nursing homes may qualify as a beneficiary's home. In contrast, the large number of SNFs and dually certified nursing homes-those certified for both Medicare and Medicaid-do not qualify as a beneficiary's home.

To identify inappropriate payments for DME, we used resident assessment data to determine all nursing home stays nationwide during 2006. We then analyzed related Medicare claims data for any DME payments during these stays.

To address these overpayments, we recommend that CMS routinely identify non-Part A beneficiary nursing home stays; recoup inappropriate payments identified in this report; identify patients entering nursing homes with rented DME; and implement a process to identify nursing homes that provide primarily skilled care and make this information available to claims processors, nursing homes, and suppliers. CMS concurred with the first two recommendations and agreed with the underlying objectives of the other recommendations but suggested alternative approaches using claims processing edits to address them.

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-06-07-00100.pdf

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6. US GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE REPORT: "Reverse Mortgages: Policy Changes Have Had Mostly Positive Effects on Lenders and Borrowers, but These Changes and Market Developments Have Increased HUD's Risk" (GAO-09-836, July 2009, .pdf format, 48p.).

http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-09-836

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7. ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH REPORT: "Alzheimer's Disease and Other Related Dementia State Plan: Senate Joint Resolution 43 Report to the Governor and General Assembly" (2009, .pdf format, 36p.).

http://www.idph.state.il.us/pdf/SJR43_Alzheimers_Report.pdf

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8. EUROPEAN COMMUNITY REPORT: "Dementia in Europe Yearbook 2008" (2008, .pdf format, 175p.).

http://ec.europa.eu/health/ph_information/reporting/docs/2008_dementiayearbook_en.pdf

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9. STATISTICS LATVIA NEWS RELEASE: Note: if the release is in Latvian, click on the "EN" tab near the top right of the page for an English version. "Age structure of the population of Latvia" (Jul. 17, 2009).

http://www.csb.gov.lv/csp/events/?mode=arh&period=07.2009&cc_cat=251&id=8645

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10. SRI LANKA DEPARTMENT OF CENSUS AND STATISTICS REPORT: "Life Tables for Sri Lanka and Districts, 2000-2002" (July 2009, .pdf format, 81p.).

http://www.statistics.gov.lk/PopHouSat/Life%20Table%20Report%202001_7th%20July%202009.pdf

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11. 2009 AARP-UNITED NATIONS BRIEFING SERIES ON GLOBAL AGING PROCEEDINGS BRIEF: Brief Proceedings of this conference, held Feb. 3-4, 2009 in New York, New York, are available (.pdf format, 31 p.) at:

http://www.aarpinternational.org/usr_attach/2009UNBriefingProceedingsFINAL.pdf

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12. CENTER FOR HEALTH CARE STRATEGIES REPORT: "Supporting Integrated Care for Dual Eligibles: Policy Options," by Melanie Bella and Lindsay Palmer (July 2009, .pdf format, 14p.).

http://www.chcs.org/publications3960/publications_show.htm?doc_id=982564

More information about CHCS:

http://www.chcs.org/info-url3959/info-url.htm

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13. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT RESEARCH INSTITUTE PERIODICAL: EBRI Notes (Vol. 30, No. 8, August 2009, .pdf format, 15p.). The two main articles in this issue are: "Health Insurance Coverage of Individuals Ages 55-64, 1994-2007," by Paul Fronstin, and "The Basics of Social Security, Updated With the 2009 Board of Trustees Report," by Ken McDonnell.

http://www.ebri.org/publications/notes/index.cfm?fa=notesDisp&content_id=4328

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14. KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION REPORT, PRIMER:

A. "Strategies for Simplifying the Medicare Advantage Market," by Marsha Gold (July 2009, .pdf format, 42p.).

http://www.kff.org/medicare/7935a.cfm

B. "A Primer on Medicare Financing," by Lisa Potetz and Juliette Cubanski (July 2009, .pdf format, 20p.).

http://www.kff.org/medicare/7731.cfm

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15. URBAN INSTITUTE REPORT: "Are Health Care Costs a Burden for Older Americans?" by Richard W. Johnson and Corina Mommaerts (July 2009, .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.urban.org/publications/411924.html

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16. INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE-UK CONFERENCE, WORKING GROUPS REPORTS:

A. "Choosing Population Projections for Public Policy" (July 2009, .pdf format, 16p.).

http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/record.jsp?type=publication&ID=42

B. "National Care Fund Working Groups Report" (July 2009, .pdf format, 16p.).

http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/record.jsp?type=publication&ID=45

More information about ILC-UK:

http://www.ilcuk.org.uk/record.jsp?type=requiredPage&ID=2

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17. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES ARTICLE: "ETS family transcription factors collaborate with alternative signaling pathways to induce carcinoma from adult murine prostate cells," by Yang Zong, Li Xin, Andrew S. Goldstein, Devon A. Lawson, Michael A. Teitell, and Owen N. Witte (Vol. 106, No. 30, Jul. 28, 2009, HTML and .pdf format, p. 12465-12470).

http://www.pnas.org/content/106/30/12465.abstract?etoc

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18. PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE (PLoS) ONE ARTICLE: "Mitochondrial Haplogroups and Control Region Polymorphisms Are Not Associated with Prostate Cancer in Middle European Caucasians," by Edith E. Mueller, Waltraud Eder, Johannes A. Mayr, Bernhard Paulweber, Wolfgang Sperl, Wolfgang Horninger, Helmut Klocker, and Barbara Kofler (PLoS ONE 4(7): e6370. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0006370, July 2009, HTML, XML, and .pdf format, 6p.).

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0006370

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19. NATURE LETTER ABSTRACT: "Presenilins are essential for regulating neurotransmitter release," by Chen Zhang, Bei Wu, Vassilios Beglopoulos, Mary Wines-Samuelson, Dawei Zhang, Ioannis Dragatsis, Thomas C. Sudhof, and Jie Shen (Vol. 460, No. 7255, Jul. 30, 2009, p. 632-636).

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v460/n7255/abs/nature08177.html

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III. Working Papers:

20. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA POPULATION STUDIES CENTER: "Low Life Expectancy in the United States: Is the Health Care System at Fault?" by Samuel H. Preston and Jessica Y. Ho (WP 7-2009, July 2009, .pdf format, 46p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://repository.upenn.edu/psc_working_papers/13/

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21. NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH: "Market Valuation of Accrued Social Security Benefits," by John Geanakoplos and Stephen P. Zeldes (w15170, July 2009, .pdf format, 31p.).

Abstract:

One measure of the health of the Social Security system is the difference between the market value of the trust fund and the present value of benefits accrued to date. How should present values be computed for this calculation in light of future uncertainties? We think it is important to use market value. Since claims on accrued benefits are not currently traded in financial markets, we cannot directly observe a market value. In this paper, we use a model to estimate what the market price for these claims would be if they were traded.

In valuing such claims, the key issue is properly adjusting for risk. The traditional actuarial approach--the approach currently used by the Social Security Administration in generating its most widely cited numbers - ignores risk and instead simply discounts "expected" future flows back to the present using a risk-free rate. If benefits are risky and this risk is priced by the market, then actuarial estimates will differ from market value. Effectively, market valuation uses a discount rate that incorporates a risk premium.

Developing the proper adjustment for risk requires a careful examination of the stream of future benefits. The U.S. Social Security system is "wage-indexed": future benefits depend directly on future realizations of the economy-wide average wage index. We assume that there is a positive long-run correlation between average labor earnings and the stock market. We then use derivative pricing methods standard in the finance literature to compute the market price of individual claims on future benefits, which depend on age and macro state variables. Finally, we aggregate the market value of benefits across all cohorts to arrive at an overall value of accrued benefits.

We find that the difference between market valuation and "actuarial" valuation is large, especially when valuing the benefits of younger cohorts. Overall, the market value of accrued benefits is only 4/5 of that implied by the actuarial approach. Ignoring cohorts over age 60 (for whom the valuations are the same), market value is only 70% as large as that implied by the actuarial approach.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w15170

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22. INSTITUTE FOR POLICY STUDIES [UNIVERSITY OF WELLINGTON, NEW ZEALAND]: Ageing New Zealand: The growing reliance on migrant caregivers," by Juthika Badkar, Paul Callister, and Robert Didham (WP 09/08, July 2009, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

Caring for the elderly is perceived to be a relatively low skilled, low paid and a low status vocation. This makes it difficult to attract people, especially young people from the local labour force into this vocation. Reflecting the type of work and its status, caring is highly gendered. New Zealands population is rapidly ageing. It is estimated that in 2031 those 65 and older will represent 35 percent of the population aged 15-64. While part of this increase is due to healthy ageing, nevertheless the number of people requiring some form of care is projected to dramatically increase. It is projected that 48,200 paid caregivers will be needed by 2036 to look after a growing number of older disabled New Zealanders requiring high levels of care and support. It is highly unlikely that the local supply will be sufficient to meet this demand. Therefore immigration of low-skill workers needs to be considered as a part of the measures needed to alleviate the future pressures on the demand for paid caregivers for the elderly. New Zealand does not have a formal scheme for caregiver migration. However there has been a rapid and growing reliance on migrant caregivers for the elderly over the last five years. In the past, caregivers for the elderly from the Pacific formed a constant source of workers; however, in the last two years there has been a sudden rise in migrant caregivers for the elderly from the Philippines. In addition to this, while in the ten years between 1991 and 2001, overseas born caregivers for the elderly roughly made up 20% of the workforce, in 2006 the proportion increased to one quarter. Globally as the demand for elder care grows, New Zealand may not be able to rely on the current sources of migrant caregivers for the elderly and alternative regions such as Melanesia and non-traditional parts of Asia need to be considered. While temporary migration is one option, programmes that provide pathways to permanent migration also need to be considered. As has occurred in some other industrialised countries, it is possible that issues of integration will arise from low skill migration. The impact of low skill migration on the labour market and skills formation and productivity must also be considered.

http://ips.ac.nz/publications/files/c1cd9eae533.pdf

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23. CENTER FOR ECONOMIC STUDIES/Ifo INSTITUTE FOR ECONOMIC RESEARCH (CESifo) [UNIVERSITY OF BONN, GERMANY]:

A. "Pension Funding and Individual Accounts in Economies with Life-cyclers and Myopes," by Hans Fehr (WP 2724, July 2009, .pdf format, 35p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/ifoHome/b-publ/b3publwp/_wp_abstract?p_file_id=16891

B. "Fertility, Human Capital Accumulation, and the Pension System," by Helmuth Cremer, Firouz Gahvari, and Pierre Pestieau (WP 2736, July 2009, .pdf format, 36p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.cesifo-group.de/portal/page/portal/ifoHome/b-publ/b3publwp/_wp_abstract?p_file_id=16881

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24. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC DIMENSIONS OF AN AGING POPULATION (SEDAP) [MC MASTER UNIVERSITY, HAMILTON, ONTARIO, CANADA]: "Older Aboriginal Peoples in Canada: Demographics, Health Status and Access to Health Care," by Mark W. Rosenberg, Kathi Wilson, Sylvia Abonyi, Adam Wiebe, Kelsey Beach, and Robert Lovelace (Research Paper No. 249, July 2009, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

This paper takes advantage of 2006 Census data, the Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) to highlight some basic demographic trends among Older Aboriginal Peoples, their health status and their use of health services in the first part of this paper. In the second part of the paper, we connect the findings to what has been specifically written about Older Aboriginal Peoples, their health status and use of health services. Not surprisingly both the data analysis and literature are limited because the preponderance of data, analyses and the literature have focused on younger Aboriginal Peoples. In essence, this underscores the need for more in-depth research on Older Aboriginal Peoples as the demographics and health status of Aboriginal Peoples.

http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/sedap/p/sedap249.pdf

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25. NEP-AGE: Working papers in the Economics of Aging are available through the bibliographic database provided by Research Papers in Economics (RePEc). The latest compilation is for Jul. 11, 2009.

http://ideas.repec.org/n/nep-age/

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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for print/electronic availability):

26. American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 170, No. 3, 4 Aug. 1, 15 2009).

Aug. 1, 2009:

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol170/issue3/index.dtl?etoc

Aug 15, 2009:

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol170/issue4/index.dtl?etoc

27. International Journal of Aging and Human Development (Vol. 69, No. 1, 2009).

http://baywood.metapress.com/link.asp?id=300312

28. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (Vol. 57, No. 8, August 2009).

http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/117995531/home

29. Medical Care (Vol. 47, No. 8, August 2009).

http://journals.lww.com/lww-medicalcare/toc/2009/08000

30. Research on Aging (Vol. 31, No. 5, September 2009).

http://roa.sagepub.com/content/vol31/issue5/?etoc

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31. AMEDEO MEDICAL LITERATURE: Note: "AMEDEO has been created to serve the needs of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, other members of the health professions, and patients and their friends. They can easily access timely, relevant information within their respective fields... All AMEDEO services are free of charge. This policy was made possible thanks to generous unrestricted educational grants provided by AMGEN, Berlex, Eisai, Glaxo Wellcome, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Schering AG."

A. Osteoporosis: Literature for the week of Jul. 27, 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ost.htm

B. Alzheimer's Disease: Literature for the week of Jul. 27, 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ad.htm

C. Parkinson's Disease: Literature for the week of Jul. 27, 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/pd.htm

D. Prostate Cancer: Literature for the week of Jul. 27, 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/prc.htm

E. Stem Cell Research: Literature for the week of Jul. 27, 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/stc.htm

F. Ophthalmology: Literature for the week of Jul. 27, 2009:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/eye.htm

AMEDEO Literature Guide:

http://www.amedeo.com/index.htm

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V. Funding Opportunities/Employment Opportunities:

32. US NATIONAL CENTER ON ELDER ABUSE: "Elder Justice Community Collaborations Request For Proposals." Deadline for applications is Aug. 28, 2009. "The National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA), a grant program of the U.S. Administration on Aging, has issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Elder Justice Community Collaborations project, administered by the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse for the NCEA. The RFP supports the development of multi-disciplinary coalitions at the local level by providing on-site training and technical assistance to Area Agencies on Aging, Title VI Grantees, and/or community organizations interested in developing new elder justice coalitions." For more information see (Microsoft Word format, 6p.):

http://www.ncea.aoa.gov/NCEAroot/Main_Site/About/Initiatives/doc/Mini-grant-RFP2009.doc

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33. SOCIETY OF ACTUARIES RETIREMENT 20/20 CALL FOR MODELS: "The Society of Actuaries Pension Section Council has announced a call for models to solicit ideas for new tier II retirement systems that align with the principles outlined in its Retirement 20/20 initiative. The Pension Section encourages submissions either by individuals or organizations for new tier II retirement systems that fit within the context of the social insurance system, culture, work patterns and social values in Canada and/or the United States. In addition, the section plans to support this call for models by awarding cash prizes for the top qualified submissions." For more information see:

http://retirement2020.soa.org/call-models.aspx

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34. FAMILY CAREGIVER ALLIANCE: "Rosalinde Gilbert Innovations in Alzheimers Disease Caregiving Legacy Awards. Application deadline is Aug. 14, 2009. For more information see:

http://caregiver.org/caregiver/jsp/content_node.jsp?nodeid=2188

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35. PARENTGIVING.COM "Parentgivers of the Year."Parentgiving's mission is to help people better care for their aging parents and with the launch of the first annual Parentgivers of the Year Awards Parentgiving.com will honor six selfless caregivers who care for an aging adult while also caring for their own families. Parentgiving invites you to nominate clients who you feel are deserving of this award and recognition. This is an excellent way to acknowledge some of your most selfless clients. Nominations are now being accepted via the Parentgiving website at www.parentgiving.com/nominate through Oct. 1, 2009. On October 15, an online voting round will begin for 10 top nominees. Voting will close on October 31, and the Parentgivers of the Year will be announced in November during National Family Caregiving month." For more information see:

http://www.parentgiving.com/elder-care/cga-contest/

Parentgiving.com:

http://www.parentgiving.com/

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36. AGEWORK.COM: Agework.com has updated its employment listings through Jul. 30, 2009).

http://agework.geron.org/c/search_results.cfm?site_id=312

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VI. Legislation Information Updates:

37. US SENATE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON AGING HEARING TESTIMONY: "Medical Research and Education: Higher Learning or Higher Earning?" a hearing held Jul. 29, 2009 (.pdf format). A video transcript of the entire hearing is available at the site (running time one hour, 23 minutes, 50 seconds).

http://aging.senate.gov/hearing_detail.cfm?id=316410&

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It is not by muscle, speed, or physical dexterity that great things are achieved, but by reflection, force of character, and judgement; and in these qualities old age is usually not only not poorer, but is even richer

Cicero--106-43 B.C.

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Jack Solock
Director--Data and Information Services Center
Social Sciences Research Services
3313 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu
http://www.disc.wisc.edu/
http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/cssrindex.html
http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/pubs/caar/back_iss.html