Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #461--October 30, 2008

CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar.html

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I. Data:

1. HEALTH AND RETIREMENT STUDY: The University of Michigan, Institute for Social Research HRS announced the following data release:

HRS 2006 Core (Final, Version 2.0) (Oct. 24, 2008).

http://hrsonline.isr.umich.edu/news/sho_news.php?hfyle=news253&xtyp=1

Data access:

http://hrsonline.isr.umich.edu/data/index.html

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2. INTER-UNIVERSITY CONSORTIUM FOR POLITICAL AND SOCIAL RESEARCH, NATIONAL ARCHIVE ON COMPUTERIZED DATA ON AGING DATASET: "Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

ICPSR NACDA has recently added - Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1971, 1985, 1988, 1991, 1994, 1997, 2000 [California] (study #2210).

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/NACDA/STUDY/22100.xml

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3. HUMAN MORTALITY DATABASE: Note: HMD requires free registration before providing data. The following updates have been added to the database:

Data for Iceland were revised and updated through 2007.

Data for Switzerland were revised and updated through 2007.

Data availability:

http://www.mortality.org/Public/DataAvailability.html

Data access:

http://www.mortality.org/

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4. MEDICAL EXPENDITURE PANEL SURVEY: AHQR has released two new MEPS data files (US Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research, October 2008, data in .zip or self decompressing [.exe] ASCII text and SAS Transport format, with documentation in HTML and .pdf format, and SAS programming statements in ASCII format).

- MEPS HC-103: 2006 Person Round Plan Public Use File

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/mepsweb/data_stats/download_data_files_detail.jsp?cboPufNumber=HC-103

- MEPS HC-102D: 2006 Hospital Inpatient Stays File

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/mepsweb/data_stats/download_data_files_detail.jsp?cboPufNumber=HC-102D

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II. Reports and articles:

5. US SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, OFFICE OF POLICY REPORTS:

A. "International Update, October 2008" (October 2008, HTML and .pdf format, 2p.).

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/progdesc/intl_update/2008-10/index.html

B. "SSI (Supplemental Security Income) Monthly Statistics, September 2008," (October 2008, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/statcomps/ssi_monthly/2008-09/index.html

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6. NATIONAL CENTER FOR HEALTH STATISTICS REPORT: "Anthropometric Reference Data for Children and Adults: United States, 2003-2006," by Margaret A. McDowell, Cheryl D. Fryar, Cynthia L. Ogden, and Katherine M. Flegal (National Health Statistics Reports, No. 10, October, 2008, .pdf format, 45p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhsr/nhsr010.pdf

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7. US DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICE, OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL REPORT: "Nationwide Review of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 Oversight," (A-04-07-05064, October 2008, .pdf format, 19p.).

We found that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) had taken limited actions to ensure that covered entities adequately implemented the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) Security Rule. These actions had not provided effective oversight or encouraged enforcement of the HIPAA Security Rule by covered entities. The HIPAA Security Rule requires a covered entity, such as a health plan or health care provider that transmits any health information in electronic form, to (1) ensure the integrity and confidentiality of the information, (2) protect against any reasonably anticipated threats or risks to the security or integrity of the information, and (3) protect against unauthorized uses or disclosures of the information.

CMS had no effective mechanism to ensure that covered entities were complying with the HIPAA Security Rule or that electronic protected health information was being adequately protected. We noted that CMS had an effective process for receiving, categorizing, tracking, and resolving complaints.

We recommended that CMS establish policies and procedures for conducting HIPAA Security Rule compliance reviews of covered entities. CMS did not agree with our findings because it believed that its complaint-driven enforcement process has furthered the goal of voluntary compliance. However, CMS agreed with our recommendation to establish specific policies and procedures for conducting compliance reviews of covered entities. We maintain that adding these reviews to its oversight process will enhance CMS's ability to determine whether the HIPAA Security Rule is being properly implemented.

http://oig.hhs.gov/oas/reports/region4/40705064.pdf

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8. US NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH PRESS RELEASE: "Review of Prostate Cancer Prevention Study Shows No Benefit for Use of Selenium and Vitamin E Supplements," (October 27, 2008).

http://www.nih.gov/news/health/oct2008/nci-27.htm

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9. AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS REPORT: "A Profile of Carers in Australia, 2008," (October 2008, .pdf and Excel format, 108p.).

http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/4448.0?OpenDocument

Click on the "Downloads" tab to view the report.

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10. STATISTICS CANADA/STATISTIQUE CANADA REPORT: "Participation and Activity Limitation Survey 2006: Tables (part V)," (October 2008, .pdf and HTML format, 97p.).

http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/89-628-XIE/89-628-XIE2008011.htm

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11. EUROSTAT COMPENDIUM: "In the spotlight - demographic change: challenge or opportunity?" (2008, .pdf and Excel format, p. 15-92). This special chapter, which appears in Eurostat Yearbook, 2008, focuses on important demographic changes (including the effects of population aging) that the EU will experience.

PDF:
http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/cache/ITY_OFFPUB/KS-CD-07-001-SPOT/EN/KS-CD-07-001-SPOT-EN.PDF

EXCEL:
http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/pls/portal/docs/PAGE/PGP_DS_YEARBOOK/PGE_DS_YEARBOOK_01/YEARBOOK/CHSP.XLS

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12. METLIFE MATURE MARKET INSTITUTE REPORT: "The MetLife Market Survey of Nursing Home & Assisted Living Costs," (October 2008, .pdf format, 26p.).

http://www.metlife.com/FileAssets/MMI/MMIStudies2008NHALCosts.pdf

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13. BOSTON COLLEGE CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH ISSUE BRIEF: "Are Older Men Healthy Enough to Work?" by Alicia H. Munnell, Mauricio Soto, and Alex Golub-Sass (Issue Brief No. 8-17, October 2008, .pdf format, 10p.).

http://crr.bc.edu/briefs/are_older_men_healthy_enough_to_work__2.html

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14. THE CENTURY FOUNDATION REPORT: "Help, I've Fallen Into the Doughnut Hole and I Can't Get Up: The Problems with Medicare Part D," by Beverly Goldberg (October 2008, .pdf format, 8p.).

http://www.tcf.org/list.asp?type=PB&pubid=664

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15. INVESTMENT COMPANY INSTITUTE REPORT: "Defined Contribution Plan Distribution Choices at Retirement: A Survey of Employees Retiring Between 2002 and 2007," by John Sabelhaus, Michael Bogdan, and Sarah Holden (October 2008, .pdf format, 82p.).

http://www.ici.org/pdf/rpt_08_dcdd.pdf

More about ICI:

http://www.ici.org/about_ici.html

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16. URBAN INSTITUTE BRIEF: "How Do Disabilities Affect Future Retirement Benefits?" by Richard W. Johnson and Gordon Mermin (Older Americans' Economic Security, No. 19, October 2008, .pdf format, 2p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411780

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17. MICHIGAN RETIREMENT RESEARCH CENTER PERIODICAL: MRRC Newsletter (Vol. 9, No. 4, October 2008, HTML and .pdf format, 10p.).

http://www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/newsletters/

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18. AARP PRIME TIME RADIO: The following Prime Time Radio shows (RealPlayer format, running time, between 23 and 30 minutes) have been added to the PTR site:

Barack Obama -- Oct. 27, 2008.

Too Old to be President? -- Oct. 28, 2008.

http://radioprimetime.org/

Note: this is a temporary address. When new PTR shows are released, these will be available at:

http://radioprimetime.org/radioprograms.htm

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19. NATURE NEUROSCIENCE ARTICLE ABSTRACT: "Phospholipase A2 reduction ameliorates cognitive deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease," by Rene O Sanchez-Mejia, John W. Newman, Sandy Toh, Gui-Qiu Yu, Yungui Zhou, Brian Halabisky, Moustapha Cisse, Kimberly Scearce-Levie, Irene H. Cheng, Li Gan, Jorge J Palop, Joseph V. Bonventre and Lennart Mucke (Vol. 11, No. 11, November 2008, .pdf format, p. 1311-1318).

http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/v11/n11/abs/nn.2213.html

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20. BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL ARTICLE, EDITORIAL:

A. "Minimally invasive treatments for benign prostatic enlargement: systematic review of randomised controlled trials," by Tania Lourenco, Robert Pickard, Luke Vale, Adrian Grant, Cynthia Fraser, Graeme MacLennan, James N'Dow, and the Benign Prostatic Enlargement team (BMJ 2008;337:a1662, October 25, 2008).

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/337/oct09_2/a1662

B. "Prevalence of depression and anxiety in patients requesting physicians aid in dying: cross sectional survey," by Linda Ganzini, Elizabeth R. Goy, and Steven K. Dobscha (BMJ 2008;337:a1662, October 25, 2008).

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/abstract/337/oct07_2/a1682

C. "Depression and physician assisted dying," by Marije L. van der Lee (BMJ 2008;337:a1558, October 25, 2008).

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/extract/337/oct07_2/a1558

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21. PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE (PLoS) ONE ARTICLE:

A. "Vitamin K Supplementation in Postmenopausal Women with Osteopenia (ECKO Trial): A Randomized Controlled Trial," by Angela M. Cheung, Lianne Tile, Yuna Lee, George Tomlinson, Gillian Hawker, Judy Scher, Hanxian Hu, Reinhold Vieth, Lilian Thompson, Sophie Jamal, and Robert Josse (PLoS Med 5(10): e196 doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.0050196, XML, HTML, .pdf format, 12p.).

http://medicine.plosjournals.org/perlserv/?request=get-document&doi=10.1371/journal.pmed.0050196&ct=1

B. "Strong Signature of Natural Selection within an FHIT Intron Implicated in Prostate Cancer Risk," by Yan Ding, Garrett Larson, Guillermo Rivas, Cathryn Lundberg, Louis Geller, Ching Ouyang, Jeffrey Weitzel, John Archambeau, Jerry Slater, Mary B. Daly, Al B. Benson, John M. Kirkwood, Peter J. O'Dwyer, Rebecca Sutphen, James A. Stewart, David Johnson, Magnus Nordborg, and Theodore G. Krontiris (PLoS ONE 3(10): e3533. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0003533, XML, HTML, .pdf format, 8p.).

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0003533

C. "The Role of Alpha 6 Integrin in Prostate Cancer Migration and Bone Pain in a Novel Xenograft Model," by Tamara E. King, Sangita C. Pawar, Lisa Majuta, Isis C. Sroka, Danyel Wynn, Manolis C. Demetriou, Raymond B. Nagle, Frank Porreca, and Anne E. Cress (PLoS ONE 3(10): e3535. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0003535, XML, HTML, .pdf format, 8p.).

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0003535

D. "GSK-3Is Required for Memory Reconsolidation in Adult Brain," by Tetsuya Kimura, Shunji Yamashita, Shinobu Nakao, Jung-Mi Park, Miyuki Murayama, Tatsuya Mizoroki, Yuji Yoshiike, Naruhiko Sahara, Akihiko Takashima (PLoS ONE 3(10): e3540. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0003540, XML, HTML, .pdf format, 9p.).

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0003540

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22. NEWSWEEK ARTICLE: "Its Very Unhealthy To Go Out Naked," by Jane Bryant Quinn (November 3, 2008).

http://www.newsweek.com/id/165971

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III. Working Papers:

23. MICHIGAN RETIREMENT RESEARCH CENTER: "How Pension Rules Affect Work and Contribution Patterns: A Behavioral Model of the Chilean Privatized Pension System," by Petra Todd and Viviana Vez-Grajales (WP 2008-193, September 2008, .pdf format, 44p.). Links to the abstract and full-text can be found at:

http://www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/index_abstract.cfm?ptid=1&pid=607

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24. PENSION RESEARCH COUNCIL, WHARTON SCHOOL, UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA: Note: PRC requires free registration before providing working papers.

A. "Between Scylla and Charybdis: Improving the Cost Effectiveness of Public Pension Retirement Plans," by M. Barton Waring (WP2008-25, October 2008, .pdf format, 26p.). Links to the abstract and full-text can be found at:

http://www.pensionresearchcouncil.org/publications/document.php?file=532

B. "Public Pensions and State and Local Budgets: Can Contribution Rate Cyclicality Be Better Managed?" by Parry Young (WP2008-26, October 2008, .pdf format, 16p.). Links to the abstract and full-text can be found at:

http://www.pensionresearchcouncil.org/publications/document.php?file=533

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25. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN POPULATION STUDIES CENTER: "Population Ageing and the Well-being of Older Persons in Thailand," by John E. Knodel and Napaporn Chayovan (PSC Research Report No. 08-659, October 2008, .pdf format, 123p.). Links to the abstract and full-text can be found at:

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=5635

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26. NATIONAL BUREAU OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH:

A. "The True Cost of Social Security," by Alexander W. Blocker, Laurence J. Kotlikoff, and Stephen A. Ross (w14427, October 2008, .pdf format, 33p.).

Abstract:

Implicit government obligations represent the lion's share of government liabilities in the U.S. and many other countries. Yet these liabilities are rarely measured, let alone properly adjusted for their risk. This paper shows, by example, how modern asset pricing can be used to value implicit fiscal debts taking into account their risk properties. The example is the U.S. Social Security System's net liability to working-age Americans. Marking this debt to market makes a big difference; its market value is 23 percent larger than the Social Security trustees' valuation method suggests.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w14427

B. "Work Expectations, Realizations, and Depression in Older Workers," by Tracy A. Falba, William T. Gallo, and Jody L. Sindelar (w14435, October 2008, .pdf format, 17p.).

Abstract:

We explore the impact on depressive symptoms of deviation in actual labor force behavior at age 62 from earlier expectations. Our sample of 4,241 observations is drawn from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). We examine workers who were less than 62 years of age at the 1992 HRS baseline, and who had reached age 62 by our study endpoint, enabling comparison of actual labor force withdrawal with earlier expectations. Poisson regression were used to estimate the impact of expected full-time work status on depressive symptoms; regressions are estimated separately for those working fulltime at age 62 and those not working fulltime. We found significant effects on depression at age 62 both for full-time workers who expected not to be working full-time, and for participants not working full-time who expected to be doing so. These results hold even after adjustment for earlier depressive symptoms, sociodemographic and other relevant controls. The findings suggest that working longer and retiring earlier than expected each may compromise psychological well-being. The current financial crisis may result in both scenarios as some workers may have to work longer than expected due to the decline in pension and other wealth while others may retire earlier due to job loss.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w14435

C. "The impact of Medicare Part D on Medicare-Medicaid Dual-eligible Beneficiaries' Prescription Utilization and Expenditures," by Anirban Basu, Wesley Yin, and G. Caleb Alexander (w14413, October 2008, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

Features of Part D gave rise to broad concern that the drug benefit would negatively impact prescription utilization among the six million dual eligible beneficiaries, either during the transition from state Medicaid to Part D coverage, or in the long-run. At the same time, Part D contained other features, such as its auto-enrollment and premium subsidization policies, which were designed to safeguard utilization for this vulnerable group. Using national retail pharmacy claims, we examine the experience of dual eligibles during the first 18 months of Part D. We find no evidence that Part D adversely affected pharmaceutical utilization or out-of-pocket expenditures in the transition period, or in the 18 months subsequent to Part D implementation.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w14413

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27. MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE FOR DEMOGRAPHIC RESEARCH: "Being born under adverse economic conditions leads to a higher cardiovascular mortality rate later in life: evidence based on individuals born at different stages of the business cycle," by Gerard J. van den Berg, Gabriele Doblhammer-Reiter, and Kaare Christensen (WP-2008-23, October 2008, .pdf format, 43p.).

Abstract:

We connect the recent medical and economic literatures on the long-run effects of early-life conditions, by analyzing the effects of economic conditions on the individual cardiovascular (CV) mortality rate later in life, using individual data records from the Danish Twin Registry covering births since the 1870s and including the cause of death. To capture exogenous variation of conditions early in life we use the state of the business cycle around birth. We find a significant negative effect of economic conditions early in life on the individual CV mortality rate at higher ages. There is no effect on the cancer-specific mortality rate. From variation within and between monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs born under different conditions we conclude that the fate of an individual is more strongly determined by genetic and household-environmental factors if early-life conditions are poor. Individual-specific qualities come more to fruition if the starting position in life is better.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2008-023.pdf

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28. SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC DIMENSIONS OF AN AGING POPULATION (SEDAP) [MCMASTER UNIVERSITY, HAMILTON ONTARIO]:

A. "Grand Coalitions for Unpopular Reforms: Building a Cross-Party Consensus to Raise the Retirement Age," by Martin Hering (Research Paper No. 233, October 2008, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

This article argues that an increase of the retirement age from 65 years to 67 or higher, which is the most unpopular pension reform measure, is politically feasible if the major parties build either a formal or an informal grand coalition. It argues further that institutional rules and agreed standards, especially the goals expressed in relation to pension policy, facilitate the formation of a grand coalition and increase the autonomy of governments vis-vis trade unions. Specifically, by restricting key policy instruments for responding to fiscal pressures, they lead political parties to consider the controversial option of raising the retirement age and to engage in a coordinative discourse about the necessity of this change and the limits of other reform options. This argument implies that the success of a retirement age reform does not depend on a negotiated agreement between a government and trade unions. By examining the agenda-setting and decisionmaking processes in Germany from the mid-1990s to 2007, this article shows that governments raise the retirement age only if they face constraints that rule out tax increases and benefit cuts and that they are able to enact even comprehensive retirement age reforms that increase not only the normal age but also the earliest eligibility age for both public and private pensions.

http://socserv.socsci.mcmaster.ca/sedap/p/sedap233.pdf

B. "Visiting and Office Home Care Workers Occupational Health: An Analysis of Workplace Flexibility and Worker Insecurity Measures Associated with Emotional and Physical Health," by Isik U. Zeytinoglu, Margaret Denton, Sharon Davies, M. Bianca Seaton, and Jennifer Millen (Research Paper No. 234, October 2008, .pdf format, 46p.).

Abstract:

The home health care sector in Canada experienced major restructuring in the mid-1990s creating a variety of flexibilities for organizations and insecurities for workers. This paper examines the emotional and physical health consequences of employer flexibilities and worker insecurities on home health care workers. For emotional health the focus is on stress and for physical health the focus is on selfreported musculoskeletal disorders. Data come from our survey of home health care workers in a mid-sized city in Ontario, Canada. Data are analyzed separately for 990 visiting and 300 office workers.

For visiting workers, results showed that none of the objective flexibility/insecurity measures are associated with stress or musculoskeletal disorders controlling for other factors. However, subjective flexibility/insecurity factors, i.e. feelings of job insecurity and labour market insecurity, are significantly and positively associated with stress. When stress is included in the analysis, for visiting workers stress mediates the effects of subjective flexibility/insecurity with musculoskeletal disorders. For office workers, none of the objective flexibility/insecurity factors are associated with stress but subjective flexibility/insecurity factor of feelings of job insecurity is positively and significantly associated with stress. For office home care workers, work on call is negatively and significantly associated with musculoskeletal disorders. Feeling job insecurity is mediated through stress in affecting musculoskeletal disorders. Feeling labour market insecurity is significantly and positively associated with musculoskeletal disorders for office home care workers. Decision-makers in home care field are recommended to pay attention to insecurities felt by workers to reduce occupational health problems of stress and musculoskeletal disorders.

http://socserv.socsci.mcmaster.ca/sedap/p/sedap234.pdf

C. "Policy Change in the Canadian Welfare State: Comparing the Canada Pension Plan and Unemployment Insurance," by Daniel Band and John Myles (Research Paper No. 235, October 2008, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

Focusing on Canada, this paper explores the politics of social policy retrenchment and restructuring in two policy areas: old-age pensions, especially the Canada Pension Plan (CPP), and Employment Insurance (EI) [formerly Unemployment Insurance (UI)]. Drawing on historical institutionalism and the literature on ideas and policy change, the paper explains key differences between these two policy areas. The analysis shows that institutional factors like federalism explain some of the differences between the policy areas and programs at stake. Yet, to complement this analysis, the paper also highlights the political consequences of changing ideas and assumptions among policy-makers, which vary strongly from one program to another. In other words, ideational and institutional factors combined to produce distinct patterns of policy change. Overall, the paper suggests that scholars can draw a clear analytical line between ideational and institutional factors before combining them to explain specific episodes of policy change. From a methodological standpoint, the paper also demonstrates the added value of systematic comparisons between distinct policy areas located within the same country.

http://socserv.socsci.mcmaster.ca/sedap/p/sedap235.pdf

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29. LUXEMBOURG WEALTH STUDY: "Housing Wealth as Retirement Saving: Does the Australian Model Lead to Over-Consumption of Housing?" by Bruce Bradbury (Working Paper No. 7, October 2008, .pdf format, 36p.).

Abstract:

Owner-occupied housing has long been seen as a key pillar of retirement saving in Australia. The Australian elderly receive a relatively small amount of their income from occupational pensions, have high home ownership and private saving, and Australia is particularly unusual in that the majority of the aged population receive an income and assets-tested aged pension (which excludes the owner-occupied home).

Does this model contribute to making the Australian elderly asset rich but income poor? How does pattern of housing wealth accumulation in Australia compare with that in other countries? This paper examines these questions using data from eight countries in the Luxembourg Wealth Study together with comparable Australian household survey data.

Australian income and housing wealth patterns in retirement are very different to those of the other eight countries. After retirement, incomes fall more steeply and housing wealth is higher. Even though housing consumption as a share of total consumption increases after retirement in all countries, this increase is particularly steep in Australia (and possibly the US).

http://www.lisproject.org/publications/lwswps/lws7.pdf

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30. OESTERREICHISCHE NATIONAL BANK: "The Optimal Mix Between Funded and Unfunded Pensions Systems When People Care About Relative Consumption," by Markus Knell (WP 146, October 2008, pdf format, 43p).

Abstract:

In this paper I derive the optimal portfolio mix between a funded and an unfunded pension system when people care about their consumption relative to a reference group. Pay-as-you-go systems with fixed contribution rates have the property that pension benefits are tied to labor income. This lowers the uncertainty of individuals' future relative position and thus increases the attractiveness of unfunded systems. The paper shows analytically that in an OLG model the optimal share of funding decreases with the strength of individuals concern for relative standing. A calibrated version of the model that uses data for various countries and time periods suggests that the sensitivity of the optimal share of funding to the concern of relative standing is also quantitatively important. For reasonable assumptions about reference standards it is typically around 20%.

http://www.oenb.at/en/img/wp146_tcm16-92027.pdf

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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

31. American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias (Vol. 23, No. 5, October/November 2008).

http://aja.sagepub.com/content/vol23/issue5/

32. Medical Care (Vol. 46, No. 11, November 2008).

http://www.lww-medicalcare.com/pt/re/medcare/toc.00005650-200811000-00000.htm

33. Public Health (Vol. 122, No. 11, November 2008).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/00333506

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34. AMEDEO MEDICAL LITERATURE: Note: "AMEDEO has been created to serve the needs of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, other members of the health professions, and patients and their friends. They can easily access timely, relevant information within their respective fields... All AMEDEO services are free of charge. This policy was made possible thanks to generous unrestricted educational grants provided by AMGEN, Berlex, Eisai, Glaxo Wellcome, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Schering AG."

A. Osteoporosis: Literature for the week of Oct. 29, 2008:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ost.htm

B. Alzheimer's Disease: Literature for the week of Oct. 29, 2008:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ad.htm

C. Parkinson's Disease: Literature for the week of Oct. 29, 2008:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/pd.htm

D. Prostate Cancer: Literature for the week of Oct. 29, 2008:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/prc.htm

E. Stem Cell Research: Literature for the week of Oct. 29, 2008:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/stc.htm

F. Ophthalmology: Literature for the week of Oct. 29, 2008:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/eye.htm

AMEDEO Literature Guide:

http://www.amedeo.com/index.htm

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V. Funding/Employment Opportunities:

35. US NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH:

A. "Notice of NIA Participation in PAR-07-018, Understanding and Promoting Health Literacy (R21)," (NOT-AG-09-001, National Institute on Aging, October 24, 2008).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-AG-09-001.html

B. "Pre-Application for the 2009 NIH Directors Pioneer Award Program (X02)" (PAR-09-012, Oct. 23, 2008). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-012.html

C. "Pre-Application for the 2009 NIH Directors New Innovator Award Program (X02)" (PAR-09-013, Oct. 23, 2008). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-09-013.html

D. "Medical Management of Older Patients with HIV/AIDS (R01)," (PA-09-017, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with other agencies, Oct. 29, 2008).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-017.html

E. "Medical Management of Older Patients with HIV/AIDS (R03)," (PA-09-018, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with other agencies, Oct. 29, 2008).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-018.html

F. "Medical Management of Older Patients with HIV/AIDS (R21)," (PA-09-019, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with other agencies, Oct. 29, 2008).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-09-019.html

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36. US NATIONAL CENTER FOR HEALTH STATISTICS: "Associate Service Fellowship with the Division of Health Interview Statistics." For more information see:

http://www.cdc.gov/NCHS/employ/employ.htm

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37. UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN: "Faculty Position, Medical History and Bioethics.""The University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health is currently seeking applications for a full-time, fully-funded faculty position in the Department of Medical History and Bioethics at any rank. We seek a colleague with an active research program and teaching interests that complement existing areas in biomedical ethics, health and society, and medical history. Special consideration will be given to candidates who address issues of population health or public health ethics, and social medicine."

http://www.ohr.wisc.edu/pvl/pv_060253.html

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VI. Websites of Interest:

38. US NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH NIH SENIORHEALTH UPDATE: A section on "Leukemia" has been added to NIHSeniorHealth.

http://www.nihseniorhealth.gov/leukemia/toc.html

NIHSeniorHealth:

http://nihseniorhealth.gov/

--
Thanks,

Charlie

***************************************************

Charlie Fiss
Information Manager
Data and Information Services Center
Rm. 3329 Social Science Bldg
1180 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1393
Phone: (608) 265-9240
Fax: (608) 262-8400
Email: fiss@ssc.wisc.edu

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