Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #302--September 1, 2005

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CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar.html

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I. Data:

1. ICPSR: The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to researchers in aging. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

A. Japanese General Social Survey (JGSS), 2001 (#4213).

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04213.xml

B. National Health Interview Survey, 2003 (#4222).

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04222.xml
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2. US CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL: CDC's "Healthy Women: State Trends in Health and Mortality" web based data extractor (Beyond 20/20, Microsoft Excel, comma or semi-colon delimited ASCII or HTML format) has recently updated its mortality data by adding "2000-2002 mortality data by State and region, gender, age, race/ethnicity, and cause of death."

http://209.217.72.34/healthywomen/ReportFolders/DirPageInfo.asp?CS_referer=&CS_ChosenLang=en

Click on "Go to Tables/Report" then "Mortality".
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3. MEPS:

A. "MEPS HC-077B: 2003 Dental Visits," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, August 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, .pdf or ASP codebook format). Note: "This file consists of 2003 data obtained in the 2003 portion of round 3 and rounds 4 and 5 for Panel 7, as well as rounds 1, 2, and the 2003 portion of round 3 for Panel 8 of the survey (i.e., the rounds for the MEPS panels covering calendar year 2003), and contains variables pertaining to household reported dental visits. The file includes the date of the dental event, type of provider seen, if the visit was due to an accident, reason for the dental event, and whether or not medicines were prescribed."

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=185

B. "MEPS HC-077C: 2003 Other Medical Expenses," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, August 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, .pdf or ASP codebook format). Note: "This public use file provides information on the purchase of and expenditures for medical equipment, supplies, glasses and other medical items for a nationally representative sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States and can be used to make estimates of the utilization and expenditures associated with medical items during the 2003 calendar year."

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=184

C. "MEPS HC-077H: 2003 Home Health File," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, August 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, .pdf or ASP codebook format). Note: "This public use file provides information on home health care for a nationally representative sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States and can be used to make estimates of the utilization and expenditures associated with home health care during the 2003 calendar year."

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=183
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4. MISSOURI STATE DATA CENTER: "The Missouri Census Data Center has completed processing the county pop estimates by age, sex, race and hispanic for all states.  MSDC has generated a set of 4 summary reports (.pdf files) for each state, including 2 at the CBSA-within-state geographic level.

http://mcdc2.missouri.edu/websas/estimate_reports.shtml

The county-level data is all out there in the MSDC data archive (state level as well - MSDC aggregated to create 1 dataset with all states), accessible via its uexplore/dexter system.  But in its raw form, this is not an easy collection to work with unless you have access to a statistical package.

http://mcdc.missouri.edu/pub/data/popests/Datasets.html

Click on the SScasrh04 dataset(where SS is your state postal abbreviation) to access county-level data for your state.  To have a chance at understanding the dataset you have to follow the link at the top to 'detailed metadata'."

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II. Reports and articles:

5. US SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, OFFICE OF POLICY REPORT: "International Update, August 2005" (August 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/progdesc/intl_update/2005-08/index.html
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6. DHHS ASPE REPORTS:

A. "Supportive Services Programs in Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities," by Barbara A. Ormond, Kirsten J. Black, Jane Tilly and Seema Thomas (US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 2005, .pdf and HTML format, 40p.).

http://aspe.hhs.gov/daltcp/reports/NORCssp.htm

B. "The Past, Present and Future of Managed Long-Term Care," by Paul Saucier, Brian Burwell and Kerstin Gerst (US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, 2005, .pdf and HTML format, 29p.).

http://aspe.hhs.gov/daltcp/reports/mltc.htm
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7. CENSUS BUREAU REPORTS:

A. "Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2004," by Carmen DeNavas-Walt, Bernadette D. Proctor, and Cheryl Hill Lee (P60-229, August 2005, .pdf format, 78p.).

http://www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/p60-229.pdf

Press Release:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/income_wealth/005647.html

B. "We the People: Blacks in the United States," by Jesse D. McKinnon and Claudette E. Bennett (CENSR-25, August 2005, .pdf format, 17p.).

http://www.census.gov/prod/2005pubs/censr-25.pdf
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8. DHHS OIG REPORT: "Review of Medicare Outpatient Cardiac Rehabilitation Provided by Hospitals," (US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General, A-05-03-00102, August 2005, .pdf format, 24p.).

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oas/reports/region5/50300102.pdf
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9. DHHS PRESS RELEASE: "Medicare Drug Plans Offer Premiums of $20 Per Month or Less Lower Deductibles, Enhanced Coverage Also Available," (US Department of Health and Human Services, August 29, 2005).

http://www.dhhs.gov/news/press/2005pres/20050829.html
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10. AARP PUBLIC POLICY INSTITUTE FACT SHEET, REPORT:

A. "Older Drivers and Automobile Safety," by Ari N. Houser (August 2005, .pdf and HTML format, 2p.).

http://www.aarp.org/research/housing-mobility/transportation/fs51r_drivers.html

B. "American Business and Older Employees: A Focus on Midwest Employees," by Kathi Brown (August 2005, .pdf format, 60p.).

http://www.aarp.org/research/work/employment/mw_employees.html
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11. MEDICARE TODAY REPORT: "Medicare Tomorrow: Future Savings for Beneficiaries," (August 2005, .pdf format, 66p.).

http://www.medicaretoday.org/clientuploads/directory/toolbox_resources/MT%20PWC%20study.pdf

Press Release:

http://www.medicaretoday.org/clientuploads/directory/toolbox_resources/MT%20PWC%20release.pdf

About Medicare Today:

http://www.medicaretoday.org/index.php?submenu=media&src=gendocs&link=What%20is%20Medicare%20Today%3F&category=Media%20Corner
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12. AUSTRALIAN DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND AGEING PRESS RELEASE:

A. "Research into dementia a major priority: Bishop," (August 29, 2005).

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/ministers/publishing.nsf/Content/health-mediarel-yr2005-jb-bis126.htm

B. "Palliative care grants to benefit terminally ill," (August 31, 2005).

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/ministers/publishing.nsf/Content/health-mediarel-yr2005-ta-abb103.htm
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13. _NEJM_ ARTICLE, PERSPECTIVE ABSTRACT:

A. "Comparison of a Single Infusion of Zoledronic Acid with Risedronate for Paget's Disease," by Ian R. Reid, Paul Miller, Kenneth Lyles, William Fraser, Jacques P. Brown, Youssef Saidi, Peter Mesenbrink, Guoqin Su, Judy Pak, Ken Zelenakas, Monica Luchi, Peter Richardson, and David Hosking (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 353, No. 9, September 1, 2005, p. 898-908).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/353/9/898

B. "Linking Compensation to Quality - Medicare Payments to Physicians," by John K. Iglehart (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 353, No. 9, September 1, 2005, p. 870-872).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/extract/353/9/870
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14. _PNAS_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT: "Reduced PU.1 expression causes myeloid progenitor expansion and increased leukemia penetrance in mice expressing PML-RAR{alpha}," by Matthew J. Walter, John S. Park, Rhonda E. Ries, Steven K. M. Lau, Michael McLellan, Sara Jaeger, Richard K. Wilson, Elaine R. Mardis, and Timothy J. Ley (_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_, Vol. 102, No. 35, August 30, 2005, .pdf and HTML format, p. 12513-12518).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/102/35/12513
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15. _NATURE_ BRIEF COMMUNICATION SUMMARY: "Phytochemistry: Ibuprofen-like activity in extra-virgin olive oil," by Gary K. Beauchamp, Russell S. J. Keast, Diane Morel, Jianming Lin, Jana Pika, Qiang Han, Chi-Ho Lee, Amos B. Smith, and Paul A. S. Breslin (_Nature_, Vol. 437, No. 7055, September 1, 2005, .pdf and HTML format, p. 45-46).

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v437/n7055/abs/437045a.html
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16. _AMERICAN PROSPECT_ ARTICLE: "Estate's Rites: Conservatives are again trying to bury the estate tax. It doesn't have to be that way," by John S. Irons and Robert Gordon (_American Prospect Web exclusive_, Aug. 25, 2005).

http://www.prospect.org/web/page.ww?section=root&name=ViewWeb&articleId=10157

More information about _AP_:

http://www.prospect.org/web/page.ww?name=About+Us&section=root

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III. Working Papers:

17. CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH AT BOSTON COLLEGE:

A. "What Replacement Rates Do Households Actually Experience in Retirement?" by Alicia H. Munnell and Mauricio Soto (WP 2005-10, August 2005, .pdf format, 47p.).

Abstract:

This paper estimates how much people actually receive in retirement relative to earnings before retirement when all sources of income, including income generated by homeownership, are combined. Previous studies find that middle class people need between 70 and 75 percent of their pre-retirement earnings to maintain their life style once they stop working. The objective of this study is to determine what people are actually receiving in retirement.

Regardless of how retirement income and pre-retirement income are defined, households with pensions appear to meet the threshold of adequacy. Those without pensions do not fare as well, and some must be really struggling. Taking into account a comprehensive measure of income both before and after retirement - including housing - produces replacement rates for those with pensions of 79 percent for couples and 89 percent for single person households. Those without pensions have replacement rates of 62 percent for couples and 63 percent for singles. These replacement rates drop about 15 percentage points, however, when recent earnings (the highest five years of the last ten) are used as the benchmark. The overall the picture is good.

But today is in some sense the "golden age" of retirement income. Today's retirees are claiming Social Security benefits before the extension in the retirement age to 66 and then 67, which is equivalent to an across-the-board cut in benefits. Today's retirees also do not face the huge deductions in their Social Security check to cover Medicare premiums for Part B and Part D that tomorrow's retirees will. And today, the average retiree does not pay personal income tax on his Social Security benefits, whereas future retirees will increasingly see a portion of their benefits subject to taxation. Finally, most of today's retirees are covered primarily by a defined benefit plan and do not face the uncertainty associated with the inadequate lump-sum payments from 401(k) plans. The comfortable circumstances of today's retirees make it very hard to call attention to the challenges that future retirees will face.

http://www.bc.edu/centers/crr/wp_2005-10.shtml

B. "Bequests, Inheritances and Family Traditions," by Donald Cox and Oded Stark (WP 2005-09, August 2005, .pdf format, 48p.).

Abstract:

Do "family traditions" influence bequest behavior? If an individual receives an inheritance from his parents, is he more likely to give a bequest to his children, even after controlling the boost in wealth conferred by the inheritance? Family traditions are pertinent to a host of issues connected with intergenerational transfers: Ricardian equivalence and crowding out, the role of bequests in wealth accumulation, and the responsiveness of bequests to tax changes. Traditions also matter for issues related to behavioral economics, such as mental accounts, social learning and intergenerational transmission of values. Yet because of data limitations few studies to date have analyzed both bequests and inheritances; most focus on one or the other individually. We use the Health and Retirement Survey (HRS), one of the few data sets with comprehensive information on both bequests and inheritances. We find that the receipt of inheritances and intended bequests are positively and significantly related (both in the economic and the statistical sense) even after controlling for a host of other household characteristics, most importantly, household net worth. Discerning the correct label to attach to this partial correlation is a more daunting task. We provide a precise definition of what we mean by a " family tradition" and how it might differ from other channels of influence. Our examination of the nuances of traditions hinges on measuring the flexibility of bequest plans when wealth or other circumstances change. (For instance, will a wealth shortfall have a smaller impact of an inheritor, who may be attempting to carry on a family tradition?) We find some evidence to support the idea that the propensity to bequeath out of wealth differs depending upon whether current wealth is large or small relative to inheritances received. We conclude that economists interested in intergenerational transfers should pay more attention to the possibility of family traditions in bequest behavior.

http://www.bc.edu/centers/crr/wp_2005-09.shtml
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18. PENSION RESEARCH COUNCIL, WHARTON SCHOOL [UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA]: " Resurrecting the Defined Benefit Pension Plan: A New Perspective," by Douglas Fore and P. Brett Hammond (WP 2005-15, 2005, .pdf format, 31p.).

Abstract:

Under the traditional approach to defined benefit plans, well-intended disciplinary and regulatory regimes have sought to restrict discretion, reduce uncertainty and risk, and protect workers and employers. Nevertheless the discouraging state of US defined benefit plans indicates that past efforts have gone awry. This chapter suggests that a new approach to defined benefit plans could resurrect the key elements required for retirement income security, rather than pursuing piecemeal reform.

http://rider.wharton.upenn.edu/~prc/PRC/WP/Hammond-Fore%20wp%2015.pdf
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19. INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF LABOR [IZA]: "Social Security Incentives, Human Capital Investment and Mobility of Labor," by Panu Poutvaara (Discussion Paper No. 1729, August 2005, .pdf format, 16p.).

Abstract:

Migration between countries with earnings-related and flat-rate pay-as-you-go social security systems may change human capital investments in both countries. The possibility of emigration boosts investments in human capital in the country with flat-rate benefits. Correspondingly, those expecting to migrate from the country with earnings-related benefits to a country with flat-rate benefits may reduce their investment in education. With suitably planned transfers between the two countries, allowing for migration may generate a Pareto-improvement for all current and future generations. Without transfers, either country may be unable to pay for promised benefits when labor becomes mobile.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1729.pdf

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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

20. American Economic Review (Vol. 95, No. 4, September 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.aeaweb.org/aer/contents/#current

21. American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 162, No. 6, Sep. 15, 2005).

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol162/issue6/index.dtl?etoc

22. Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences (Vol. 60A, No. 8, August 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://biomed.gerontologyjournals.org/content/vol60/issue8/?etoc

23. Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences (Vol. 60B, No. 5, Sept. 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://psychsoc.gerontologyjournals.org/content/vol60/issue5/?etoc
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24. INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search"
C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button
D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button.
E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

American Sociological Review (Vol. 70, No. 4, August 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

Canadian Journal on Aging (Vol. 24, No. 2, 2005).

Journal of Aging and Physical Activity (Vol. 13, No. 3, 2005).

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25. AMEDEO MEDICAL LITERATURE: Note: "AMEDEO has been created to serve the needs of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, other members of the health professions, and patients and their friends. They can easily access timely, relevant information within their respective fields... All AMEDEO services are free of charge. This policy was made possible thanks to generous unrestricted educational grants provided by AMGEN, Berlex, Eisai, Glaxo Wellcome, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Schering AG."

A. Osteoporosis: Literature for the week of August 31, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ost.htm

B. Alzheimer's Disease: Literature for the week of August 31, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ad.htm

C. Parkinson's Disease: Literature for the week of August 31, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/pd.htm

D. Prostate Cancer: Literature for the week of August 31, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/prc.htm

E. Stem Cell Research: Literature for the week of August 31, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/stc.htm

F. Ophthalmology: Literature for the week of August 31, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/eye.htm

AMEDEO Literature Guide:

http://www.amedeo.com/index.htm

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V. Books:

26. RUTGERS UNIVERSITY PRESS: _Grandmotherhood: The Evolutionary Significance of the Second Half of Female Life_ by Voland Eckart, Athanasios Chasiotis, and Wulf Schiefenhöevel (Rutgers University Press, 2005, ISBN 0-8135-3609-X, 304p.).

http://rutgerspress.rutgers.edu/acatalog/__Grandmotherhood_2266.html

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VI. Funding Opportunities:

27. NIH:

A. "Paul B. Beeson Career Development Awards in Aging," (US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with other agencies, RFA-AG-06-005, August 25, 2005).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-06-005.html

B. "Notice Announcing Change in Funds Available for RFA-AG-06-001: The Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Centers (OAICs)," (US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, NOT-AG-05-007, August 24, 2005).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-AG-05-007.html

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VII. Conferences:

28. CENTER FOR STRATEGIC AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES [CSIS]: The CSIS Global Aging Initiative and Mexico Project is hosting a policy forum entitled " Building Human Capital in an Aging Mexico" (September 7, 2005). For agenda and registration information go to:

http://www.csis.org/gai/050907_mexicoreleaseevent.pdf

Thanks,

Charlie

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Charlie Fiss
Information Manager
Center for Demography and Ecology and
Center for Demography of Health and Aging
Rm. 4470A Social Science Bldg
1180 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1393
Phone: (608) 265-9240
Fax: (608) 262-8400
Email: fiss@ssc.wisc.edu

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