Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #289--May 26, 2005

====================================================================================

CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar.html

=======================================================================

I. Data:

1. PANEL STUDY OF INCOME DYNAMICS: The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research PSID has announced the following data release: "The 2003 Family Wealth Data and Codebook are now available in the Data Center. These data build on existing wealth data from years 1984, 1989, 1994, 1999, and 2001 and are made possible with generous support from the National Institute on Aging."

http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/Guide/DataNewsDet.aspx?&ID=332

More information on PSID data acquisition:

http://psidonline.isr.umich.edu/data/
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

2. IPUMS: "The Minnesota Population Center is delighted to announce the first release of a nationally representative microdata sample of the 1930 U.S. census. The 1930 IPUMS sample represents the capstone of a fifteen-year effort to create an integrated census database describing the American population from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The IPUMS now includes individual-level samples for every surviving census from 1850 through 2000. The current 1930 data release is a 1-in-500 sample. The MPC plans to release the final 1-in-100 sample in 2007. The data is currently available via the IPUMS-USA beta site."

https://beta.ipums.org/usa/index.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

3. ICPSR: The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to researchers in aging. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Survey of Program Dynamics (SPD), 2001: Cross-Sectional File (#3806)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/03806.xml

Kaiser Permanente Study of the Oldest Old, 1971-1979 and 1980-1988 (#4219)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04219.xml
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

4. UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following dataset to its holdings. Note: There may be charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/usingData/introduction.asp

English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA); Wave 1, 2002-2003: Teaching Dataset (SN 5172):

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/search/indexSearch.asp?ct=xmlSn&q1=5172
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

5. NLS WEB INVESTIGATOR UPDATE: The Bureau of Labor Statistics National Longitudinal Study has updated its NLS Web Investigator data extraction system. For details see:

http://www.chrr.ohio-state.edu/nls-info/ordering/display_db.php3

NLS Web Investigator:

http://www.nlsinfo.org/web-investigator/index.php

=======================================================================

II. Reports and articles:

6. AARP POLICY AND RESEARCH GLOBAL AGING PROGRAM REPORT, ARTICLE:

A. "Sexuality at Midlife and Beyond: 2004 Update of Attitudes and Behaviors" (May 2005, .pdf format, 126p.).

http://www.aarp.org/research/family/lifestyles/2004_sexuality.html

Click on "Full Report" for link to full text

News Release:

http://www.aarp.org/research/press-center/presscurrentnews/Articles/sexpectations.html

B. "Helping Older Americans to Carry on Working Requires a Comprehensive Approach," by John Martin (May 2005).

http://www.aarp.org/research/international/perspectives/may_05_olderworkers.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

7. CMS NEWS RELEASES:

A. "CMS Proposes Payment Increases, Policy Refinements For Inpatient Rehabilitation Facilities" (US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, May 19, 2005).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1464

B. "Prescription Drug Purchasing Simplified Through New Technologies" (US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, May 23, 2005).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1466

C. "Medicare Announces New Proposed Rule To Improve Hospice Care" (US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, May 25, 2005).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1469
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

8. NCHS REPORT: "National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2003 Emergency Department Summary," by Linda F. McCaig, and Catharine W. Burt (Advance Data Number 358, May 2005, .pdf format, 40p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/05news/emergencydept.htm

Click on "View/download PDF" for full text.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

9. ILCUSA REPORTS:

A. "ILC Policy Report," (International Longevity Center, USA, May 2005, .pdf format, 7p.). The ILC Policy Report is "a monthly compilation of longevity news and trends in the U.S. and abroad."

B. "Human Values in Aging," by Rick Moody (May 2, 2005, .pdf format, 4p.).

C. "Soul of Bioethics," by Rick Moody (May 20, 2005, .pdf format, 5p.).

All reports can be accessed from:

http://www.ilcusa.org/pub/news.htm

The Moody authored reports are at the bottom of the page.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

10. GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY CENTER ON AN AGING SOCIETY REPORT: "Demography Is Not Destiny, Revisited," by Robert B. Friedland and Laura Summer (March 2005, .pdf format, 113p.).

Abstract:

This report provides a framework and some of the basic data necessary to understand why the future of the United States will not be determined solely by anticipated changes in the size and age distribution of the population. Choices made through the political process and through market forces, in conjunction with demographic changes, will determine the future, the authors say. The critical challenge of an aging society is not so much how to accommodate the older population, but how to ensure the productivity of future workers, regardless of age. Public policies that encourage and facilitate education, basic research, and the application of promising technologies can enhance the well-being of current and future generations of older people. Greater economic growth can make policy choices easier, but deciding how much of the proceeds of economic growth to use collectively and how to distribute costs and benefits will require political and policy choices.

http://ihcrp.georgetown.edu/agingsociety/pdfs/DINDII.pdf
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

11. METLIFE MATURE MARKET INSTITUTE REPORTS:

A. "Demographic Profile of American Baby Boomers" (2005, .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.metlife.com/WPSAssets/34442486101113318029V1FBoomer%20Profile%202005.pdf

B. "Demographic Profile of 65+ Population" (2005, .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.metlife.com/WPSAssets/78466792201110468360V1F65+Profile-10-10-04.pdf
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

12. WORLD BANK REPORT: "Old-Age Income Support in the 21st Century: An International Perspective on Pension Systems and Reform," by by Robert Holzmann, Richard Hinz, and Bank staff (2005, .pdf format, 218p.). "Old-Age Income Support in the 21st Century attempts to explain current policy thinking and update the World Bank's perspective on pension reform. The Bank has been involved in pension reforms in nearly 60 countries, and the demand for its support continues to grow. This book incorporates lessons learned from recent Bank experiences and research that have significantly increased knowledge and insight regarding how best to proceed in the future."

http://www1.worldbank.org/sp/incomesupport.asp
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

13. UK HOUSE OF COMMONS PUBLIC ACCOUNTS COMMITTEE REPORT: "Welfare to work: tackling the barriers to the employment of older people," (HC 439, May 2005, HTML and .pdf format , 46p.).

HTML:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmselect/cmpubacc/439/43902.htm

.pdf:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmselect/cmpubacc/439/439.pdf
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

14. AUSTRALIAN DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND AGEING NEWS RELEASE: "3.1 million dollar (2.35 million US dollars) boost for the elderly, disabled and carers" (JB057/05, May 20, 2005).

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/wcms/publishing.nsf/Content/health-mediarel-yr2005-jb-bis057.htm
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

15. PALLIATIVE CARE AUSTRALIA REPORT: "Standards for Providing Quality Palliative Care for all Australians" (May 2005, .pdf format, 40p.).

http://www.pallcare.org.au/documents/Standards.pdf

More information on PCA:

http://www.pallcare.org.au/pca_aboutpca.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

16. _PNAS_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT: "CD147 is a regulatory subunit of the {gamma}-secretase complex in Alzheimer's disease amyloid {beta}-peptide production," by Shuxia Zhou, Hua Zhou, Peter J. Walian and Bing K. Jap (_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 102, No. 21, May 24, 2005, p. 7499-7504).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/102/21/7499?etoc
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

17. _NATURE_ SPECIAL ISSUE: The May 26, 2005 (Vol. 435, No. 7041) issue of _Nature_ is a special issue devoted to Avian Flu. Full text may or may not be available depending on whether you or your institution subscribe to the publication.

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v435/n7041/index.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

18. _BMJ_ EDITORIAL EXTRACT: "Stem cell therapy: hope or hype?" (_British Medical Journal_ Editorial, Vol. 330, No. 7501, May 21, 2005, p. 1159-1160).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/330/7501/1159
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

19. _JAMA_ MEDICAL NEWS AND PERSPECTIVES EXTRACTS:

A. "Better Osteoporosis Management a Priority: Impact Predicted to Soar With Aging Population," by Bridget M. Kuehn (_Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 293, No. 20, May 25, 2005, p. 2453-2458).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/extract/293/20/2453

B. "Longer-lasting Osteoporosis Drugs Sought," by Bridget M. Kuehn (_Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 293, No. 20, May 25, 2005, p. 2458).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/extract/293/20/2458

C. "FDA Warns Antipsychotic Drugs May Be Risky for Elderly," by Bridget M. Kuehn (_Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 293, No. 20, May 25, 2005, p. 2462).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/extract/293/20/2462
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

20. MEDSCAPE ARTICLE: Note: Medscape requires free registration before providing articles. "JNC 7 Category and Risk of Cardiovascular Death in Men: Are There Differences by Age?" by Thomas S. Bowman, Howard D. Sesso, Robert J. Glynn, and J. Michael Gaziano (_The American Journal of Geriatric Cardiology_, Vol. 14, No. 3, 2005, p. 126-131, via Medscape).

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/504774
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

21. _NEWSWEEK_ ARTICLE: "Stem Cells: Big Step for a Controversial Science," by Claudia Kalb (_Newsweek_, May 30, 2005).

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/7937442/site/newsweek/
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

22. AARP Prime Time Radio: The following AARP _Prime Time Radio_ show, for May 23, 2005, is now available (RealPlayer plug-in or helper application required, audio transcripts run between 24 and 30 minutes).

May 23, 2005: Caring for your Parents

http://www.aarp.org/fun/radio/pt_radio/caring_for_your_parents.html

=======================================================================

III. Working Papers:

23. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN POPULATION RESEARCH CENTER: "Older Persons in Cambodia: A Profile from the 2004 Survey of Elderly," by John E. Knodel, Souvan Kirv Kim, Zachary S. Zimmer, and Sina Puch (PSC Research Report No. 05-576, May 2005, .pdf format, 78p.).

Abstract:

This report provides a basic but comprehensive demographic, social, economic and health profile of Cambodia's older population based on the 2004 Survey of Elderly in Cambodia (SEC), a representative survey of persons age 60 and over conducted in Phnom Penh and the five largest provinces. As such it represents the first comprehensive examination of the situation of Cambodian elders based on a widely representative sample. The traumatic history of social dislocation, civil strife and political violence that the current generation of elders survived is evident in the fact that over two-fifths lost at least one child and close to one fourth of the women lost a spouse during the short but lethal period of Khmer Rouge rule during 1975-79. Given the lack of alternatives, Cambodian elders rely heavily on filial support as indicated by high levels of coresidence and contributions of modest amounts of money and material goods from children. Both the economic situation and health of Cambodian elders is generally quite unfavorable reflecting the pervasive poverty and underdevelopment of country in general. The results point to a need for greater recognition on the part of the government and aid agencies of the needs and potential contribution of this important but hitherto largely ignored segment of the population.

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=3225

Click on PDF icon for full text.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

24. MICHIGAN RETIREMENT RESEARCH CENTER: "Knowledge and Preference in Reporting Financial Information," by Honggao Cao and Daniel H. Hill (WP 2005-100, April 2005, .pdf format, 20p.).

Abstract:

This article models respondent behavior in a financial survey with a framework explicitly integrating a respondent's knowledge of and willingness to reveal his or her financial status. Whether a respondent provides a valid answer, a "don't know", or a "refusal" to a financial question depends on the interaction of his or her financial knowledge and preferences regarding revealing the knowledge. Using asset response and nonresponse data from the Health and Retirement Study (2000), we found that knowledge and preferences play interrelated roles in reporting financial information, that a respondent's age, gender, education, and race and ethnicity are important predictors of respondent behavior, and that race and ethnicity affect a respondent behavior only via their influence on preferences, while gender only via its influence on knowledge. We also found strong heterogeneity in respondents' financial knowledge and their willingness to reveal the knowledge.

http://www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/publications/index_abstract.cfm?ptid=1&pid=344

Click on "Full paper" at the bottom of the abstract for full text.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

25. BOSTON COLLEGE CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH:

A. "Validation Study of Earnings Data in the SIPP--Do Older Workers Have Larger Measurement Error?" by Peter Gottschalk and Minh Huynh (WP 2005-07, May 2005, .pdf format, 21p.).

Abstract:

The Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) is a potentially useful data set to study earnings and retirement dynamics of older workers. Respondents' self-reported work and earnings in the SIPP are, however, likely to be measured with error, and this measurement error may be particularly large for older respondents who work non-standard hours. We explore the extent of measurement error by comparing SIPP employment and earnings data to administrative records contained in the matched Detail Earning Record.

http://www.bc.edu/centers/crr/wp_2005-07.shtml

B. "Local Labor Market Conditions and Retirement Behavior," by Dan A. Black and Xiaoli Liang (WP 2005-08, May 2005, .pdf format, 34p.).

In this paper, we explore the effect of local labor market conditions on the labor supply decisions of older workers. We use three different sources of variation: shocks to the US steel industry, shocks to Appalachian coal mining, and shocks to US manufacturing. While each experiment uses different methodology, the three tell a remarkably consistent story: the retirement decisions of Americans over the last thirty-five years have been affected by the performance of local labor markets. First, using variation induced by the decline in the US steel industry, we find that a 10 percent reduction in earnings resulting from the decline of the primary metals industry resulted in a 1.5 percent increase in the participation and expenditures of the Old Age program. Second, using variation in coal prices induced by oil shocks, we find that a 10 percent increase in earnings from the coal industry reduced participation about 0.9 percent and decreases expenditures about 1.2 percent. Finally, looking at variation induced by the concentration of manufacturing employment, we use micro data to examine the age and education levels of those who retired.

http://www.bc.edu/centers/crr/wp_2005-08.shtml
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

26. NBER: "Age and Great Invention," by Benjamin F. Jones (National Bureau of Economic Research w11359, May 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

Great achievements in knowledge are produced by older innovators today than they were a century ago. Using data on Nobel Prize winners and great inventors, I find that the age at which noted innovations are produced has increased by approximately 6 years over the 20th Century. This trend is consistent with a shift in the life-cycle productivity of great minds. It is also consistent with an aging workforce. The paper employs a semi-parametric maximum likelihood model to (1) test between these competing explanations and (2) locate any specific shifts in life-cycle productivity. The productivity explanation receives considerable support. I find that innovators are much less productive at younger ages, beginning to produce major ideas 8 years later at the end of the 20th Century than they did at the beginning. Furthermore, the later start to the career is not compensated for by increasing productivity beyond early middle age. I show that these distinct shifts for knowledge-based careers are consistent with a knowledge-based theory, where the accumulation of knowledge across generations leads innovators to seek more education over time. More generally, the results show that individual innovators are productive over a narrowing span of their life cycle, a trend that reduces -- other things equal -- the aggregate output of innovators. This drop in productivity is particularly acute if innovators' raw ability is greatest when young.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11359
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

27. SSA OP: "Social Security as a Retirement Resource for Near-Retirees," by Benjamin Bridges and Sharmila Choudhury (US Social Security Administration, Office of Research, Evaluation, and Statistics, Office of Policy WP No. 106, May 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 77p.).

Abstract:

This paper analyzes Social Security benefits as a retirement resource for near-retirees. It looks at how the average values of several measures of benefits such as Social Security wealth and earnings replacement rates have changed from earlier cohorts to today's near-retiree cohort, examines differences among demographic and socioeconomic groups within cohorts, and discusses reasons for these changes and differences. The paper uses greatly improved data (actual earnings histories) to produce more accurate measures of benefits; it also uses some new benefit measures. Key findings include the following: (1) average real Social Security wealth increases markedly for successive age cohorts, primarily because of increases in average real earnings; (2) replacement rates fall for recent cohorts, primarily because of the phase-in of increases in the age of eligibility for full benefits; and (3) median Social Security wealth is much higher for women than for men because women live longer.

HTML:

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/workingpapers/wp106.html

.pdf:

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/workingpapers/wp106.pdf
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

28. US FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD: "Are Firms or Workers Behind the Shift Away from DB Pension Plan?"Stephanie Aaronson and Julia Coronado (2005-17, April 2005, .pdf format, 31p.).

Abstract:

One of the most striking changes in the composition of household retirement savings over the past 20 years has been the shift from defined benefit to defined contribution pension plans. Understanding the factors underlying this shift is important for determining its impact on retirement saving adequacy. Yet previous research, which has mostly focused on factors affecting all firms, such as regulation or increased longevity, has yielded little consensus. In this study we estimate the contribution of changing workforce characteristics and production environments to the shift in pension coverage. Our findings suggest that, while aggregate factors explain a large part of the movement, changes in worker demand, due to evolving workforce characteristics, also contributed notably. On the supply side, we find support for the theory that technical change has reduced the value of DB plans. These supply and demand factors are particularly important for explaining the significant variation in cross-industry trends in pension coverage.

http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/2005/200517/200517abs.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

29. MELBOURNE INSTITUTE OF APPLIED ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL RESEARCH [UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE]: "Transitions to Retirement: A Review," by Jeff Borland (Working Paper No. 3/05, April 2005, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

This paper presents a conceptual framework for thinking about issues associated with the transition to retirement by older workers, and then reviews available Australian and international empirical evidence and literature on this topic.

http://melbourneinstitute.com//wp/wp2005n03.pdf
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

30. INSTITUTE FOR FISCAL STUDIES [London, UK]: "Estimating pension wealth of ELSA [English Longitudinal Study of Ageing] respondents," by James Banks, Carl Emmerson, and Gemma Tetlow (WP 05/09, May 2005, .pdf format, 68p.).

Abstract:

This paper explains the methodology used for calculating pension wealth for all individuals in the first wave of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). We focus on the pension wealth of individuals aged between 50 and the state pension age. Both state and private pension wealth has been calculated and each has been calculated both on the basis of immediate retirement in 2002 and on the basis of retirement at the state pension age. Sensitivity analysis of our assumptions is also presented, which shows that the distribution of pension wealth is sensitive to our assumptions about the discount rate and contracting out histories but insensitive to assumptions about future earnings growth, future annuity rates and future asset returns.

http://www.ifs.org.uk/publications.php?publication_id=3369
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

31. CENTER FOR ECONOMIC STUDIES/IFO INSTITUTE FOR ECONOMIC RESEARCH (CESifo) [UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH, GERMANY]: "Why Forcing People to Save for Retirement may Backfire," by Monika Butler, Olivia Huguenin, and Federica Teppa (WP 1458, April 2005, .pdf format, 39p.).

Abstract:

If individuals are unable or unwilling to borrow, a higher than desired second pillar pension capital may induce people to retire earlier than they would have in the absence of such a scheme. Individuals thus leave the workforce as soon as the retirement income is deemed sufficient and the pension plan avails withdrawal of benefits. We provide evidence using individual data from a selection of Swiss pension funds, allowing us to perfectly control for pension scheme details. Our findings suggest that affordability is a key determinant in the retirement decisions. The higher the accumulated pension capital, the earlier individuals tend to leave the workforce.

http://www.cesifo-group.de/~DocCIDL/cesifo1_wp1458.pdf
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

32. WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY AT ST. LOUIS ECONOMIC WORKING PAPER ARCHIVE:

A. "Old Age Poverty in the Indian States: What the Household Data Can Say?" by Sarmistha Pal and Robert Palacios (May 2005, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

In the absence of any official measures of old age poverty, this paper uses National Sample Survey household-level data to investigate the extent and nature of living standards and incidence of poverty among elderly in sixteen major states in India. We construct both individual and household-level poverty indices for the elderly and examine the sensitivity of these poverty indices to different equivalence scales and size economies in consumption. In general, these adjusted estimates indicate that households with elderly members have lower incidence of poverty in all of the states, albeit to different degrees. Part of the explanation appears to be related to differences in dependency ratios in households with and without elderly, where a significant percentage of elderly, especially men, continue to work well past the age of sixty. The favourable effect of the presence of elderly on household living standards and incidence of poverty is however weakened once we control for dependency ratio, among other things, with significant inter-state variation noted in our sample.

http://econwpa.wustl.edu/eps/lab/papers/0505/0505015.pdf

B. "The Role of Endogenous Skill Choice in an Aging Society," by Christian Jaag (May 2005, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

This paper analyzes the effects of an aging population on individual skill choices and the production structure by means of a dynamic general equilibrium model with overlapping generations and probabilistic aging. The model allows for capital-skill complementarity,which strongly affects the outcomes in a small open economy setting vs. a closed (or equivalently worldwide) economy. In an open economy with a fixed real interest rate, the necessary increase in the contribution rate discourages labor supply and depresses gdp. With a variable real interest rate, however, capital usage increases and - by the capital-skill complementarity -also employment of high skilled labor. The mobilization of highly productive labor gives a boost to gdp. Hence, the often cited adverse effects of aging are mitigated and can be overcome when taking into account a more realistic production structure.

http://econwpa.wustl.edu/eps/pe/papers/0505/0505005.pdf
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

33. NATIONAL CENTRE FOR SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC MODELLING (NATSEM) [UNIVERSITY OF CANBERRA, AUSTRALIA]: "Where are Aged Care Services Needed in NSW [New South Wales]- Small Area Projections of Care Needs and Capacity for Self Provision of Older Australians," by Brown, Sharyn Lymer, Mandy Yap, Mohan Singh and Ann Harding (Conference Paper CP0506, May 2005, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

The aged care sector is responding to a changing social and economic environment but is the Industry well positioned to meet the challenges associated with population ageing and the future needs of the ageing baby boomers? At the moment, neither the Government nor the Aged Care Industry have adequate strategic planning and decision-support tools for forecasting the future demand for aged care services by older Australians; identifying areas of Australia where the supply of services is unlikely to meet need; estimating the expected cost of such services; and the financial capacity of older Australians to bear a greater share of those costs. In addition, such estimates have not been available at a detailed regional or small area level. NATSEM has developed a spatial microsimulation model - known as CareMod - to assist in addressing these key issues. This paper provides an overview of the technical development of CareMod, including a description of the model's data base, the approach taken to modelling disability levels and need for care, and the regional methodology that has been developed to generate its small area estimates. The paper then provides some preliminary findings regarding the estimated levels of disability and need for care within NSW to illustrate some basic applications of the model, and finally the paper concludes with some comments on future extensions.

http://www.natsem.canberra.edu.au/publication.jsp?titleID=CP0506
=======================================================================

IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

34. American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 95, No. 6, Jun. 1, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Elite database. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.ajph.org/content/vol95/issue6/?etoc

35. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics (Vol. 41, No. 1, July-August 2005).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/01674943

36. American Journal of Sociology (Vol. 110, No. 5, March 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/AJS/journal/contents/v110n5.html

37. Medical Care (Vol. 43, No. 6, June 2005).

http://www.lww-medicalcare.com/pt/re/medcare/issuelist.htm
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

38. INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search"
C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button
D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button.
E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

International Psychogeriatrics (Vol. 17, No. 1, 2005).

Journal of Aging and Physical Activity (Vol. 13, No. 2, 2005).

Journal of Gerontological Social Work (Vol. 44, No. 1/2, 2004).

Social Work (Vol. 50, No. 2, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

39. AMEDEO MEDICAL LITERATURE: Note: "AMEDEO has been created to serve the needs of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, other members of the health professions, and patients and their friends. They can easily access timely, relevant information within their respective fields... All AMEDEO services are free of charge. This policy was made possible thanks to generous unrestricted educational grants provided by AMGEN, Berlex, Eisai, Glaxo Wellcome, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Schering AG."

A. Osteoporosis: Literature for the week of May 25, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ost.htm

B. Alzheimer's Disease: Literature for the week of May 25, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ad.htm

C. Parkinson's Disease: Literature for the week of May 25, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/pd.htm

D. Prostate Cancer: Literature for the week of May 25, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/prc.htm

E. Stem Cell Research: Literature for the week of May 25, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/stc.htm

AMADEO Literature Guide:

http://www.amedeo.com/index.htm

=======================================================================

V. Funding Opportunities:

40. NIH: "Developmental Research on Elder Mistreatment" (RFA-AG-05-009, US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging and Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research, Mar. 23, 2005). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-05-009.html
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

41. AOA: "Standard Performance Outcomes Measures Project (POMP)" (US Administration on Aging, May 2005). For more information see:

http://www.aoa.gov/doingbus/fundopp/fundopp.asp

Note: This may be a temporary address. Direct link to announcement (.pdf format, 37p.).

http://www.aoa.gov/doingbus/fundopp/announcements/2005/pomp_05_25_05.pdf

=======================================================================

VI. Legislation Information Updates:

42. US HOUSE COMMITTEE ON WAYS AND MEANS, SUBCOMMITTEE ON SOCIAL SECURITY, HEARING TESTIMONY:

A. "Second in a Series of Subcommittee Hearings on Protecting and Strengthening Social Security," a hearing held May 24, 2005.

http://waysandmeans.house.gov/hearings.asp?formmode=detail&hearing=413

B. "Third in a Series of Subcommittee Hearings on Protecting and Strengthening Social Security," a hearing held May 26, 2005.

http://waysandmeans.house.gov/hearings.asp?formmode=detail&hearing=416
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

43. US HOUSE ENERGY AND COMMERCE COMMITTEE HEARING PUBLICATION: "Medicare Prescription Drug Discount Cards: Immediate Savings for Seniors," a hearing held May 20, 2004 (US House Serial Publication 108-130, ASCII text and .pdf format, 141p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house05ch108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-130" (without the quotes).
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

44. US HOUSE GOVERNMENT REFORM COMMITTEE HEARING PUBLICATION: "Balancing Act: The Health Advantages of Naturally-Occurring Hormones in Hormone Replacement Therapy," a hearing held Jul. 22, 2004 US House Serial Publication 108-249, ASCII text and .pdf format, 101p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house07ch108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-249" (without the quotes).
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

45. US SENATE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON AGING HEARING PUBLICATION: "Breaking the Silver Ceiling: A New Generation of Older Americans Redefining the New Rules of the Workplace," a hearing held Sep. 24, 2004 (Senate Hearing 108-746, Serial Publication 108-43, ASCII text and .pdf format, 114p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/senate/senate22sh108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-746" (without the quotes).
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

46. US SENATE FINANCE COMMITTEE HEARING TESTIMONY: "Social Security: Achieving Sustainable Solvency," a hearing held May 25, 2005 (.pdf format).

http://finance.senate.gov/sitepages/hearing052505.htm

=======================================================================

VII. Websites of Interest:

47. NIH DATABASE UPDATE: "Cognitive and Emotional Health Project (CEHP)" The CEHP searchable database has been updated and improved:

http://trans.nih.gov/cehp/hbq/search.asp

More information on CEHP:

http://trans.nih.gov/cehp/

Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology and Center for
Demography of Health and Aging
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu