Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #283--April 14, 2005

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CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar.html

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I. Data:

1. HRS DOCUMENTATION ERRATA: The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research Health and Retirement Study has announced documentation errata for the 1994 HRS Core (Wave 2, Final, Version 2.0). For more information see:

http://hrsonline.isr.umich.edu/meta/alerts/sho_alerts.php?hfyle=errata001&xtyp=3

Data availability:

http://hrsonline.isr.umich.edu/data/index.html
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2. NCI SEER: "SEER 1973-2002 Public-Use Data. (US National Cancer Institute)." "NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results public use data has been updated through 2002 (ASCII or binary format--for use with SEER*Stat extraction software). Interested researchers must sign off on a public-use data agreement before acquiring the data, either directly from the website, or via CD-ROM." "The SEER Public-Use Data include SEER incidence and population data associated by age, sex, race, year of diagnosis, and geographic areas (including SEER registry and county). A signed SEER Public-Use Data Agreement is required to access these data. Use of these data for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes submission and release dates."

http://seer.cancer.gov/publicdata/

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II. Reports and articles:

3. DHHS OIG REPORTS:

A. "Nursing Homes Enforcement: The Use of Civil Money Penalties" (US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Inspector General OEI-06-02-00720, April 2005, .pdf format, 34p.). "This OIG inspection revealed that, while $81.7 million was imposed during calendar years 2000 and 2001 for CMPs, $34.6 million (42 percent) was paid as of December 2002. The difference is primarily attributable to reductions authorized by regulation and delays resulting from appeals and bankruptcies. Monies not paid included CMPs that were not yet due, primarily as the result of processing appeals or bankruptcies; reductions of CMP dollar amounts due, such as the 35 percent reduction for nursing facilities waiving their rights to an appeal; and nonpayments. At the same time, CMS does not utilize the full dollar range allowed for CMPs; imposition amounts tend toward the lower ends of allowable ranges; and collections took over 6 months on average. OIG recommends that CMS provide additional written guidance to its regional offices and to State agencies regarding appropriate dollar ranges for individual ratings of scope and severity. We also recommend that CMS clarify staff responsibilities with respect to past due CMPs and conduct an internal process review that would enable CMS and States to streamline CMP processing. CMS concurred with our recommendations.

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-06-02-00720.pdf

B. "Informal Dispute Resolution for Nursing Facilities" (US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Inspector General OEI-06-02-00750, March 2005, .pdf format, 30p.). "This inspection is part of the OIG's ongoing evaluation of the quality of care provided to nursing facility residents, particularly as measured by survey deficiencies and by how States and CMS manage them. OIG found that States and nursingfacilities substantially comply with requirements for the Informal Dispute Resolution process. Forty-eight of fifty States provided their own written IDR policies that are available upon request, as required. Additionally, all 14 States for which we reviewed case documentation perform IDR reviews, largely in the required manner. We also found that 45 percent of the deficiencies cited were changed as a result of the reviews. However, most State notification letters to the nursing facilities omitted required information regarding how the IDR review will be conducted and by whom. CMS concurred with our recommendations. The agency further commented they have already begun work to ensure that all States maintain written policies and that States review their policies for consistency with the minimum requirements listed in Federal regulations and the State Operations Manual.

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-06-02-00750.pdf
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4. SSA ACTUARIAL NOTES, OP REPORTS:

A. "Internal Real Rates of Return Under the OASDI Program for Hypothetical Workers," by Orlo Nichols, Michael Clingman, and Alice Wade (US Social Security Administration, Office of the Chief Actuary, Actuarial Note 2004.5, March 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 9p.).

HTML:

http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/NOTES/ran5/an2004-5.html

.pdf:

http://www.ssa.gov/OACT/NOTES/ran5/an2004-5.pdf

B. "OASDI [Old Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance] Monthly Statistics, March 2005 (US Social Security Administration, Office of Policy, March 2005, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/statcomps/oasdi_monthly/2005-03/index.html

C. "SSI [Supplemental Security Income] Monthly Statistics, February 2005" (US Social Security Administration, Office of Policy, March 2005, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/statcomps/ssi_monthly/2005-03/index.html
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5. NIA ALZHEIMER'S RESEARCH UPDATE: "Clinical Diagnosis of Alzheimer's May Be Delayed, Says Major Clinical Trial" (US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, Alzheimer's Disease Research Update, Apr. 13, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 3p.).

http://www.alzheimers.org/nianews/nianews73.htm
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6. CMS NEWS RELEASES:

A. "Medicare Takes Major Step Toward Improving Quality Of Care" (US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Apr. 7, 2005).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1421

B. "Medicare Announces Draft Guidance For National Coverage Determinations With Evidence Development" (US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Apr. 7, 2005).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1423

C. "Medicare Announces Funding For Health Insurance Counseling Programs For 2005" (US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Apr. 11, 2005).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1426
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7. CDC _MMWR_ QUICKSTATS: "QuickStats: Life Expectancy at Birth, by Year --- United States, 1970--2003" (US Centers for Disease Control, _Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report_, Vol. 54, No. 14, Apr. 15, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, p. 363).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5414a6.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5414.pdf
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8. BOSTON COLLEGE CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH JUST THE FACTS: "What is Progressive Price Indexing?" by Alicia H. Munnell and Mauricio Soto (JTF #17, April 2005, .pdf format, 5p.).

http://www.bc.edu/centers/crr/jtf_17.shtml
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9. BROOKINGS INSTITUTION ARTICLE: "Saving Social Security: The Diamond-Orszag Plan," by Peter A.Diamond and Peter R. Orszag (_Economists' Voice_, vol. 2, no. 1, April 2005, .pdf format, 9p.).

http://www.brookings.edu/views/papers/orszag/200504security.htm
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10. KFF REPORT: "Low-Income Subsidies for the Medicare Prescription Drug Benefit: The Impact of the Asset Test," by Thomas Rice, and Katherine A. Desmond (April 2005, .pdf format, 33p.). "This study assesses the impact of the requirement that low-income people with Medicare meet an asset test in order to receive additional help paying premiums and cost-sharing under the new Medicare drug benefit."

http://www.kff.org/medicare/7304.cfm
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11. PRB PERIODICAL, ARTICLE, :

A. _Population Bulletin_ (Vol. 60, No. 1, March 2005, .pdf format). This issue's topic is: "Global Aging: The Challenge of Success."

http://www.prb.org/pdf05/60.1GlobalAging.pdf

B. "Is 'Increasing Mobility' a Threat to U.S. Elder Care?" by Alison Stein Wellner (Population Reference Bureau, April 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/Is_Increasing_Mobility_a_Threat_to_U_S__Elder_Care_.htm
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12. AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT PRODUCTIVITY COMMISSION REPORT: "Economic Implications of an Ageing Australia," (Productivity Commission, April 2005, .pdf and .rtf format, 428p.).

http://www.pc.gov.au/study/ageing/finalreport/index.html

Related technical papers:

http://www.pc.gov.au/study/ageing/finalreport/technicalpapers/index.html

Related data (Microsoft Excel format):

http://www.pc.gov.au/study/ageing/finalreport/data/index.html

Press release:

http://www.pc.gov.au/study/ageing/finalreport/mediarelease.html
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13. _PNAS_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT: "Conformational transition of amyloid {beta}-peptide," by Yechun Xu, Jianhua Shen, Xiaomin Luo, Weiliang Zhu, Kaixian Chen, Jianpeng Ma, and Hualiang Jiang (_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 102, No. 15, Apr. 12, 2005, p. 5403-5407).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/102/15/5403?etoc
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14. _BMJ_ EDITORIAL EXTRACT, NEWS EXTRACT, NEWS ROUNDUP EXTRACT, ARTICLE ABSTRACT:

A. "'Right to die'" (_British Medical Journal_ Editorial, Vol. 330, No. 7495, p. 799.).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/330/7495/799

B. "Assisted dying legislation must wait until after UK election," by Kathryn Godfrey (_British Medical Journal_ News, Vol. 330, No. 7495, p. 807.).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/330/7495/807

C. "Radiation for prostate cancer increases risk of rectal cancer," by Janice Hopkins Tanne (_British Medical Journal_ News Roundup, Vol. 330, No. 7495, p. 809.).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/extract/330/7495/809

D. "Utility of testing for monoclonal bands in serum of patients with suspected osteoporosis: retrospective, cross sectional study," by Bo Abrahamsen, Ivan Andersen, Susanne S Christensen, Jonna Skov Madsen, and Kim Brixen (_British Medical Journal_, Vol. 330, No. 7495, p. 818-821.).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/abstract/330/7495/818
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15. _JAMA_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT: "Cardiovascular Mortality Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease: Comparison of Traditional and Novel Risk Factors," by Michael G. Shlipak, Linda F. Fried, Mary Cushman, Teri A. Manolio, Do Peterson, Catherine Stehman-Breen, Anthony Bleyer, Anne Newman, David Siscovick, and Bruce Psaty (_Journal of the American Medical Association_, Vol. 293, No. 14, Apr. 13, 2005, p. 1737-1745).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/293/14/1737

US National Institutes of Health news release: "Traditional Risk Factors are Better than Emerging Risk Factors in Predicting Heart Disease Death in Older People with Chronic Kidney Disease" (Apr. 12, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/apr2005/nhlbi-12.htm
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16. _NEJM_ BOOK REVIEW EXTRACTS:

A. _. . . And a Time to Die: How American Hospitals Shape the End of Life_, by Sharon R. Kaufman, and _Physician-Assisted Dying: The Case for Palliative Care and Patient Choice_, by Timothy E. Quill and Margaret P. Battin, reviewed by James L. Bernat (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 352, No. 14, Apr. 7, 2005, p. 1500-1501).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/extract/352/14/1500

B. _Dying Justice: A Case for Decriminalizing Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide in Canada_, by Jocelyn Downie, reviewed by Robert A. Burt (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 352, No. 14, Apr. 7, 2005, p. 1501-1502).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/352/14/1501
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17. AARP PERIODICAL: _AARP Bulletin_ (April 2005). Selected articles from the latest _Bulletin_ are available at:

http://www.aarp.org/bulletin/toc/Articles/tableofcontents.html

Note: This is a temporary address. When the next _Bulletin_ is released, the selected articles from this one will be available by clicking on "other issues" on the right side of the page.

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III. Working Papers:

18. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN POPULATION STUDIES CENTER: "Rural Parents with Urban Children: Social and Economic Implications of Migration on the Rural Elderly in Thailand," by John E. Knodel and Chanpen Saengtienchai (PSC Research Report 05-574, April 2005, .pdf format, 38p.).

Abstract:

The goal of the present study is to explore the circumstances in Thailand under which the migration of rural adult children to urban areas takes place, with attention to how parents and their situation influence these decisions, and the consequences for the social and economic well-being of parents who remain behind in the rural areas after the children leave. The analysis relies primarily on 27 open ended interviews conducted in 2004 with older age parents with migrant children from four purposively selected rural communities that were studied 10 years earlier. Our findings suggest that for many, probably most rural Thai elderly parents, the migration of children to urban areas contributes positively to their material well-being. Negative impacts of migration on social support, defined in terms of maintaining contact and visits, have been attenuated by the advent of technological changes in communication and also by improvements in transportation. Phone contact, especially through mobile phones, is now pervasive in sharp contrast to the situation 10 years earlier when it was extremely rare. Much of the change in Thailand in terms of the relationships between rural parents and their geographically dispersed adult children is quite consistent with the concept of the 'modified extended family', a perspective that has become common in discussions regarding elderly parents in industrial and postindustrial societies but rarely is applied to the situation of elderly parents in developing country settings.

http://www.psc.isr.umich.edu/pubs/abs.html?ID=3200
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19. RAND CORPORATION LABOR AND POPULATION PROGRAM:

A. "The Retirement-Consumption Puzzle: Anticipated and Actual Declines in Spending at Retirement," by Michael Hurd and Susann Rohwedder (WR-242, 2005, .pdf format, 33p.).

Abstract:

The simple one-good model of life-cycle consumption requires "consumption smoothing." However, British and U.S. households apparently reduce consumption at retirement and the reduction cannot be explained by the life-cycle model. An interpretation is that retirees are surprised by the inadequacy of resources. This interpretation challenges the life-cycle model where consumers are forward looking. However, data on anticipated consumption changes at retirement and on realized consumption changes following retirement show that the reductions are fully anticipated. Apparently the decline is due to the cessation of work-related expenses and the substitution of home production for market-purchased goods and services.

http://www.rand.org/publications/WR/WR242/

B. "Do the Elderly Respond to Taxes on Earnings? Evidence from the Social Security Retirement Earnings Test," by David S. Loughran and Steven Haider (WR-223, 2005, .pdf format, 50p.)

Abstract:

The effective tax on earnings embodied in the Social Security retirement earnings test has been as high as 50 percent. Surprisingly, among the numerous empirical studies that have examined the earnings test, there is little agreement about whether the earnings test affects elderly labor supply at all. This paper examines new and reconsiders existing empirical evidence on the earnings test and conclude that, at least for men, the earnings test has a substantial impact on labor supply and claiming behavior.

http://www.rand.org/publications/WR/WR223/
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20. NBER: "The Effects of Competition on Variation in the Quality and Cost of Medical Care," by Daniel P. Kessler and Jeffrey J. Geppert (w11226, March 2005, .pdf format, 22p.).

Abstract:

We estimate the effects of hospital competition on the level of and the variation in quality of care and hospital expenditures for elderly Medicare beneficiaries with heart attack. We compare competition's effects on more-severely ill patients, whom we assume value quality more highly, to the effects on less-severely ill, low-valuation patients. We find that low-valuation patients in less-competitive markets receive more intensive treatment than in more-competitive markets, but have statistically similar health outcomes. In contrast, high-valuation patients in less-competitive markets receive less intensive treatment than in more-competitive markets, and have significantly worse health outcomes. Since this competition-induced increase in variation in expenditures is, on net, expenditure-decreasing and outcome-beneficial, we conclude that it is welfare-enhancing. These findings are inconsistent with conventional models of vertical differentiation, although they can be accommodated by more recent models.

http://www.nber.org/papers/W11226
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21. MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE FOR DEMOGRAPHIC RESEARCH [ROSTOCK GERMANY]:

A. "Official population statistics and the Human Mortality Database estimates of populations aged 80+ in Germany and nine other European countries," by Dmitri Jdanov Rembrandt Scholz and Vladimir M. Shkolnikov (MPIDR Working Paper 2005-010 .pdf format 37p.).

Abstract:

A systematic comparison of the Human Mortality Database and official estimates of populations aged 80+ is presented. We consider statistical series for East and West Germany and also series for Denmark, England and Wales, France, Finland, Hungary, the Netherlands, Russia, Sweden, and Switzerland. The Human Mortality Database (HMD, www.mortality.org) methodology re-lies on the methods of extinct and almost extinct generations. HMD estimates are precise if the quality of death data is high and the migration among the elderly is negligible. The comparisons between the HMD and the official populations are not fully appropriate for the 1990s since the HMD calculations are related to official population estimates. A significant overestimation of the male population aged 80+ and especially 90+ between the censuses of 1970 and 1987 was found in West Germany. The relative surplus of men aged 90+ increased from 5 to 20 percent, which expressed in absolute numbers indicates an increase from 2 to 10 thousand. In 1971-1987 the official death rates have fallen dramatically to implausibly low values. In 1987-88 death rates based on the official populations suddenly jumped to the HMD death rates due to the census re-estimation. In the 1990s an accelerated decrease in male death rates has resumed. For other countries, the relative and absolute deviations from the HMD estimates were especially high in Russia, Hungary, and England and Wales. Regression analysis reveals common factors of the relative deviation from the HMD populations. The deviation tends to decrease with time, increase with age, be higher during inter-census periods than in census years, and to decrease after the introduction of population registers. (Key words: aging; elderly; population estimates; quality of statistics)

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/Papers/Working/wp-2005-010.pdf

B. "Subjective well-being and mortality in Chinese oldest old," by Qiang Li (MPDIR Working Paper 2005-100, .pdf format, 33p.).

Abstract:

The present study investigates the relationship between subjective well-being (SWB) and mortality risk, using a large sample (N=7852) from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Study (age range 80-105) conducted in 2000 and 2002. Initially, we intended to contribute to the understanding of system relations between SWB, mortality risk, and unobserved heterogeneity by treating SWB as an endogenous variable, using a multi-process model. However, failure to identify unobserved heterogeneity in the mortality equation prevents us from employing this model. Given this limitation, the study examines three issues. First, we argue that the mortality model with duration dependency on the age of the study subjects is specified and that the model with duration dependency on time since the interview is misspecified. Second, we address problems associated with the identification of unobserved heterogeneity in the mortality equation. Third, we examine the association between SWB and mortality risk in the Chinese oldest old as well as the risk pattern by gender, without considering unobserved heterogeneity. We find that SWB is not a significant predictor of mortality risk when we control for socio-demographic characteristics and health status. Health plays a very important role in the relationship between SWB and mortality risk in the oldest old. Gender differences in the predictive pattern of SWB on this risk are negligible in the sample.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/Papers/Working/wp-2005-011.pdf
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22. OECD: "The impact of ageing on demand, factor markets and growth," by Joaquim Oliveira Martins, Frederic Gonand, Pablo Antolin, Christine de la Maisonneuve and Kwang-Yeol Yoo (Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development Working Paper 420, April 2005, Microsoft Word and .pdf format, 100p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines the channels through which ageing will shape the main economic factors that in turn affect potential growth; identifies current policy settings that may in fact amplify the adverse impact of demographic trends; and sets out policy reforms that will work to temper the effects of ageing on growth. The paper begins with a brief discussion of demographic issues. The analysis first focuses on the impact of these trends on the future level and structure of consumption, which may affect aggregate saving and the structure of the economy, respectively. Then, it explores the main channels through which ageing affects the supply side of the economy following a production function approach: capital markets, labour markets and productivity. The empirical analysis focuses on a subset of large OECD countries with differing ageing patterns and generosity of pension systems. Using a simple general equilibrium overlapping generations model and considering alternative reform scenarios, some illustrative simulations are presented decomposing the effects of ageing on potential GDP per capita growth and economic convergence within OECD countries.

http://www.olis.oecd.org/olis/2005doc.nsf/linkto/eco-wkp(2005)7
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23. Centre for International Studies on Economic Growth [Rome, Italy: "Fiscal Implications of Pension Reforms in Italy," by Agar Brugiavini and Franco Peracchi (WP 213, February 2005, .zip compressed .pdf format, 49p.).

http://www.ceistorvergata.it/pubblicazioni/quaderni_ceis/working/working_papers.asp?quaderno=213
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24. CESifo: "Ageing, Funded Pensions and the Dutch Economy," by Lans Bovenberg and Thijs Knaap (Center for Economic Studies/Ifo Institute for Economic Research [Munich, Germany] WP 1403, February 2005, .pdf format, 26p.).

Abstract:

This paper attempts to paint a coherent picture of the effects of ageing on a small, open, economy with large pension funds in different institutional settings. Quantitative scenarios are projected with an applied computable general equilibrium model with institutional details. We find that ageing leads to a tighter labor market, increasing costs for both pension funds and the government, and leaving the economy vulnerable to financial and further demographic shocks. We show that defined benefit pension arrangements can be destabilizing, but less so if an average-wage variable-indexation contract is chosen. Government can help by adopting a policy of tax smoothing, but the single most important determinant of the net burden of ageing is the eventual size of the increase in labor market participation of older workers. The intergenerational welfare effects of demographic shocks and changes in international interest rates are sizable and should be an integral part of the assessment of different policy instruments.

http://www.cesifo-group.de/~DocCIDL/cesifo1_wp1403.pdf
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25. FEDEA: "The limits on the Design of Long-Term Care Insurance Schemes in Spain," by Joan Costa-Fonta and Montserrat Font-Vilalta (Fundacion de Estudios de Economia Aplicade [Madrid, Spain] eee 201, March 2005, .pdf format, 15p.).

Abstract:

Social and demographic changes are transforming the way societies cope with old age dependency, obliging them to extend the market, or public coverage, for long-term care insurance. This paper examines the financing alternatives for insuring long-term care in Spain and scrutinises the existing empirical evidence to evaluate the financing tools available for extending long-term care insurance. We argue that private long-term care insurance will play either a complementary or a supplementary role alongside a compulsory mainstream insurance scheme. Evidence from surveys on Spanish social attitudes suggests that the general population prefer publicly funded schemes, although these preferences are subject to significant regional heterogeneity.

ftp://srvfedea.fedea.es/pub/eee/eee201.pdf

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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

26. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics (Vol. 40, No. 3, May 2005).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/01674943
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27. AMEDEO MEDICAL LITERATURE: Note: "AMEDEO has been created to serve the needs of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, other members of the health professions, and patients and their friends. They can easily access timely, relevant information within their respective fields... All AMEDEO services are free of charge. This policy was made possible thanks to generous unrestricted educational grants provided by AMGEN, Berlex, Eisai, Glaxo Wellcome, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Schering AG."

A. Osteoporosis: Literature for the week of Apr. 13, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ost.htm

B. Alzheimer's Disease: Literature for the week of Apr. 13, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ad.htm

C. Parkinson's Disease: Literature for the week of Apr. 13, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/pd.htm

D. Prostate Cancer: Literature for the week of Apr. 13, 2005:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/prc.htm

E. Stem Cell Research: Literature for the week of Apr. 13, 2005:

http://amedeo.com/medicine/stc.htm

AMADEO Literature Guide:

http://www.amedeo.com/index.htm

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V. Conferences:

28. CONFERENCEALERTS.COM: Conferencealerts.com has recently updated its Gerontology conference listings:

http://www.conferencealerts.com/aging.htm
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VI. Legislation Information Updates:

29. US SENATE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON AGING HEARING TESTIMONY: "The Role of Employer-Sponsored Retirement Plans in Increasing National Savings," a hearing held Apr. 12, 2005 (.pdf format). Note: A video transcript of this hearing is available at the site, RealPlayer plug-in or helper application required, running time: 1 hour, 39 minutes, 11 seconds.

http://aging.senate.gov/public/index.cfm?Fuseaction=Hearings.Detail&HearingID=62

Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology and Center for
Demography of Health and Aging
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu