Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #267--December 16, 2004

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CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar.html

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I. Data:

1. ICPSR NACDA BIBLIOGRAPHY OF DATA RELATED RESEARCH: The Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging has made available a browsable and searchable bibliography of literature related to its data holdings.

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/NACDA/bibliography.html
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2. NHIS: "The Division of Health Interview Statistics (DHIS) of the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) announces the Internet release of the 2003 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data files and supporting documentation (December 2004, datasets in Windows or DOS self-decompressing [.exe] ASCII format, documentation in .pdf format, SPSS, SAS, and Stata data input statements in ASCII format).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/nhis/quest_data_related_1997_forward.htm

Scroll to "2003 NHIS".
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3. WHO MORTALITY DATABASE: The documentation and data file for ICD10 of the World Health Organization WHO Mortality Database has been updated as of Dec. 10, 2004). For more information see:

http://www3.who.int/whosis/mort/text/download.cfm?path=whosis,whsa,mort_download&language=english

and scroll to the bottom of the page.
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4. MEPS: "MEPS HC-070: 2002 Full Year Consolidated Data File" (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, December 2004, data in .zip or Windows or Dos self-decompressing [.exe] ASCII or SAS transport format, documentation in .pdf, HTML, and .asp format, with SAS and SPSS programming statements in ASCII format).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=173
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5. NCI SEER: "Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) US Population Data, 1969-2002 (US National Cancer Institute, December 2004, Windows or DOS self-decompressing [.exe] ASCII format). "County-Level Populations are available for the following time periods and "races": 1969-2002: White, Black, Other; 1990-2002: Expanded Races (White, Black, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian/Pacific Islander) by Origin (Hispanic, Non-Hispanic); Population files with 19 age groups (<1, 1-4, ..., 80-84, 85+) and with 85 single-year age groups (<1, 1, 2, ..., 84, 85+) are provided. The 19-group files are currently available for download... The single-year files will be available on or before April 8, 2005."

http://seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html
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II. Reports and articles:

6. DHHS CMS NEWS RELEASES, FACT SHEET:

A. "Improved Efforts to Reduce Medicare Payment Error Rates" (US Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Dec. 13, 2004).

http://www3.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1281

B. "CMS Announces Demonstration Project to Reduce Disparities in Cancer Prevention and Treatment" (US Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Dec. 14, 2004).

http://www3.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1283

C. "Medicare Opens National Coverage Determination to Make Sure Beneficiaries Who Need Wheelchairs Get Them" (US Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Dec. 15, 2004).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1286

D. "Medicare Proposes to Cover Stem Cell Transplantation for Primary Amyloid Light Chain (Al) Amyloidosis" (US Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Factsheet, Dec. 15, 2004).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1287
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7. SSA OP REPORT: "Earnings and Employment Data for Workers Covered Under Social Security and Medicare, by State and County, 2002" (US Social Security Administration, Office of Policy, December 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 453p.). Note: The HTML format contains a subset of the .pdf format information.

http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/statcomps/eedata_sc/2002/index.html
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8. NCHS REPORT: "Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From the January-June 2004 National Health Interview Survey" (US National Center for Health Statistics, December 2004, .pdf format, 93p.). Note: The section on "Personal Care Needs" may be of interest to researchers in aging.

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/nhis/released200412.htm
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9. GAO REPORTS:

A. "Medicare Physician Fee Schedule: CMS Needs a Plan for Updating Practice Expense Component" (US Government Accountability Office, GAO-05-60, December 2004, .pdf format, 38p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d0560.pdf

B. "Medicare: CMS's Program Safeguards Did Not Deter Growth in Spending for Power Wheelchairs" (US Government Accountability Office, GAO-05-43, November 2004, .pdf format, 33p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d0543.pdf

Note: These are temporary addresses. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
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10. CIHI REPORT: "National Health Expenditure Trends, 1975-2004" (Canadian Institute for Health Information/Institut Canadien d'Information sur la Sante, December 2004, .pdf format, 149p., with data tables in .zip compressed Microsoft Excel format). Note: CIHI requires free registration before distributing reports.

http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/dispPage.jsp?cw_page=PG_318_E&cw_topic=318&cw_rel=AR_31_E
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11. NORWAY MINISTRY OF FINANCE/MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS REPORT SUMMARY: "Summary of Report No. 12 (2004-2005) to the Storting: Pension Reform - Safeguarding Our Pensions" (2004).

http://www.pensjonsreform.no/english.asp?id=22#m
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12. CPA AUSTRALIA REPORT: "Superannuation: the Right Balance? - the cost of delay," (December 14, 2004, .pdf format, 10p.).

http://www.cpaaustralia.com.au/cps/rde/xchg/SID-3F57FEDE-AFB85BFE/cpa/hs.xsl/726_12093_ENA_HTML.htm

More information on CPS Australia:

http://www.cpaaustralia.com.au/cps/rde/xchg/SID-3F57FEDE-AFB85BFE/cpa/hs.xsl/14_ENA_HTML.htm
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13. URBAN INSTITUTE REPORT: "Does Work Pay at Older Ages?" by Barbara Butrica, Richard W. Johnson, Karen E. Smith, and C. Eugene Steuerle (December 2004, .pdf format, 50p.).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411121
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14. KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION/HEWITT ASSOCIATES SURVEY REPORT: "Current Trends and Future Outlook for Retiree Health Benefits: Findings from the Kaiser/Hewitt 2004 Survey on Retiree Health Benefits," by Frank McArdle, Amy Atchison, Dale Yamamoto, Michelle Kitchman and Tricia Neuman (December 2004, .pdf format, 67p., chartpack, .pdf format, 33p., with "exhibits" [charts] in HTML format). "A new survey of large employers finds businesses and retirees experienced double-digit increase in retiree health costs, with further increases expected in 2005. The survey also includes an early look at employers' responses to the new Medicare drug law."

http://www.kff.org/medicare/med121404pkg.cfm
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15. _PNAS_ COMMENTARY EXTRACT, ARTICLE ABSTRACT:

A. "Organismal stress and telomeric aging: An unexpected connection," by Robert M. Sapolsky (_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_, Vol. 101, No. 50, Dec. 14, 2004, p. 17323-17324).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/extract/101/50/17323?etoc

B. "Lentiviral vector delivery of parkin prevents dopaminergic degeneration in an {alpha}-synuclein rat model of Parkinson's disease," by Christophe Lo Bianco, Bernard L. Schneider, Matthias Bauer, Ali Sajadi, Alexis Brice, Takeshi Iwatsubo, and Patrick Aebischer (_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_, Vol. 101, No. 50, Dec. 14, 2004, p. 17510-17515).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/101/50/17510?etoc
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16. _JAMA_ ARTICLE ABSTRACTS

A. "Association Between Cardiovascular Outcomes and Antihypertensive Drug Treatment in Older Women," by Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Bruce Psaty, Philip Greenland, Albert Oberman, Theodore Kotchen, Charles Mouton, Henry Black, Aaron Aragaki, and Maurizio Trevisan (_Journal of the American Medical Association_, Vol. 292, No. 23, Dec. 15, 2004, p. 2849-2859).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/292/23/2849

B. "Does This Woman Have Osteoporosis?" by Amanda D. Green, Cathleen S. Colon-Emeric, Lori Bastian, Matthew T. Drake, and Kenneth W. Lyles (_Journal of the American Medical Association_ Clinician's Corner, Vol. 292, No. 23, Dec. 15, 2004, p. 2890-2900).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/292/23/2890

C. "Mixed Dementia: Emerging Concepts and Therapeutic Implications," by Kenneth M. Langa, Norman L. Foster, and Eric B. Larson (_Journal of the American Medical Association_ Clinical Review, Vol. 292, No. 23, Dec. 15, 2004, p. 2901-2908).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/292/23/2901
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17. _NEJM_ BOOK REVIEW EXTRACTS:

A. _Coping with Methuselah: The Impact of Molecular Biology on Medicine and Society_, edited by Henry J. Aaron and William B. Schwartz, reviewed by Leonid Gavrilov (_New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 351, No. 25, Dec. 16, 2004, p. 2663-2664).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/extract/351/25/2663

B. _Alzheimer Disease: Neuropsychology and Pharmacology_, edited by Gerard Emilien, Cecile Durlach, Kenneth L. Minaker, Bengt Winblad, Serge Gauthier, and Jean-Marie Maloteaux, reviewed by Albert Hofman (_New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 351, No. 25, Dec. 16, 2004, p. 2665).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/extract/351/25/2665
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18. _BMJ_ NEWS ROUNDUP: "Fourteen cases of euthanasia to be referred to French police," by Brad Spurgeon (_British Medical Journal_, Vol. 328, No. 7450, May 22, 2004, p. 1221).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/328/7450/1221-a?etoc
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19. _LANCET_ EDITORIAL: Note: _Lancet_ requires free registration before providing content. "HRT: what are women (and their doctors) to do?" (_Lancet, Vol. 364, No. 9451, HTML and .pdf format, p. 2069-2070).

HTML:

http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol364/iss9451/full/llan.364.9451.analysis_and_interpretation.31469.1

.pdf:

http://pdf.thelancet.com/pdfdownload?uid=llan.364.9451.analysis_and_interpretation.31469.1&x=x.pdf
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20. MEDSCAPE ARTICLES: Note: Medscape requires free registration before providing articles.

A. "High-Risk Alcohol Consumption and Late-Life Alcohol Use Problems," by Rudolf H. Moos, Penny L. Brennan, Kathleen K. Schutte, and Bernice S. Moos (_American Journal of Public Health_ Vol. 94, No. 11, November 2004, p. 1985-1991, via Medscape).

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/494658

B. "Indicators of Recurrent Hospitalization for Pneumonia in the Elderly," by Ali A. El Solh, Thomas Brewer, Mifue Okada, Omar Bashir, and Michael Gough (_Journal of the American Geriatrics Society_, Vol. 52, No. 12, 2004, p. 2010-2015).

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/495094
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21. _US NEWS AND WORLD REPORT_ ARTICLE: "A road map for Alzheimer's," by Bernadine Healy (_US News and World Report_, Dec. 20, 2004).

http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/041220/opinion/20healy.htm
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22. _NATION_ ARTICLE: "Anti-Social Security," by Dean Baker (_Nation_, Dec. 9, 2004).

http://www.thenation.com/doc.mhtml?i=20041227&s=baker
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23. ALTERNET ARTICLE: "Social Security Suicide," by Molly Ivins (Alternet, Dec. 14, 2004).

http://www.alternet.org/election04/20746/

More information on Alternet:

http://www.alternet.org/about/
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24. _WEEKLY STANDARD_ ARTICLE: "Republican Insecurity," by Fred Barnes (_Weekly Standard_, Vol. 10, No. 14, Dec. 20, 2004).

http://www.weeklystandard.com/Content/Public/Articles/000/000/005/024dohba.asp

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III. Working Papers:

25. UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA POPULATION AGING RESEARCH CENTER:

A. "Crime and Early Retirement Among Older Americans," by Dan Silverman and Olivia S. Mitchell (WPS 04-01, 2004, .pdf format, 28p.).

Abstract:

This paper investigates the relationship between local crime rates and the retirement decisions of older Americans. We do so by linking data from the Health and Retirement Study with measures of local crime patterns taken from the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Unified Crime Reports. If we condition on crime rates alone, there is either a weakly positive or no relationship between local crime patterns and older men's propensity to retire early. But unobservable factors associated with early retirement may be correlated with residence in higher-crime rate cities, so next we condition on both the expectation for the crime rate and deviations from average crime levels. We find a positive and statistically significant association between early retirement and expectations for murder rates, and a positive but, on average, imprecisely estimated positive association between early retirement and unexpected increases in crime. The effect of unanticipated increases in crime is greatest, and significant for those in poor health. In this latter group, men are 14 percent more likely to retire early given a standard deviation increase in unexpected murder rates. These findings are consistent with a pattern of more early retirement among those who live in higher crime areas, and earlier retirement among those in poor health when crime levels rise above anticipated levels.

http://www.pop.upenn.edu/rc/parc/aging_center/2004/PARCwps04-01.pdf

B. "Pension Supervision: Key Policy Issues from International Experience," by Anca Mataoanu (WPS 04-03, 2004, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

Creating and maintaining effective pension regulatory and supervisory structures that secure the interests of the participants and beneficiaries is crucial for systemic stability and economic growth. This paper focuses on the supervision of privately managed, defined contribution pension systems and attempts to clarify key factors that determine the setting and operational activity of pension supervisory structures. Intensity of supervision is measured and compared across a sample of eight countries, using a scoring system that factors in elements that are common to the operational activities of supervision. The results of the exercise show consistent patterns of intensity of supervision activities in relation to the level of economic development, the depth of financial markets, the legal traditions, and the administrative settings of the pension systems in the countries observed. As of yet, there are no best practice models for pension supervision. Nevertheless, consistent supervisory practices can be derived from matching context with supervisory methods to guide policymakers in their decisions.

http://www.pop.upenn.edu/rc/parc/aging_center/2004/PARCwps04-03.pdf
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26. NBER:

A. "The Effect of Improvements in Health and Longevity on Optimal Retirement and Saving," by David E. Bloom, David Canning, and Michael Moore (w10919, November 2004, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

We develop a life-cycle model of optimal retirement and savings behavior under complete markets where retirement is caused by worsening health in old age. Our model explains the long-run decline in the age of retirement as an income level effect. We show that improvements in health and longevity tend to increase the desired retirement age, though less than proportionately, while, contrary to conventional views, reducing savings rates. The retirement age is not simply proportional to healthy life span because compound interest creates a wealth effect when lifespan increases, leading to more leisure (early retirement) and higher consumption (lower savings).

http://papers.nber.org/papers/w10919

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address for full text.

B. "Prescription Drugs, Medical Care, and Health Outcomes: A Model of Elderly Health," by Zhou Yang, Donna B. Gilleskie, and Edward C. Norton (w10964, December 2004, .pdf format, 53p.).

Abstract:

There is much debate about whether the Medicare Prescription Drug Bill--the greatest expansion of Medicare benefits since its creation in 1965--will improve the health of elderly Americans, and how much it will cost. We model how insurance affects medical care utilization, and subsequently, health outcomes over time in a dynamic model with correlated errors. Longitudinal individual-level data from the 1992-1998 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey provide estimates of these effects. Simulations over five years show that expanding prescription drug coverage would increase drug expenditures by between 12% and 17%. However, other health care expenditures would only increase slightly, and the mortality rate would improve.

http://www.nber.org/papers/W10964

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address for full text.

C. "Aging and the Welfare State: The Role of Young and Old Voting Pivots," by Assaf Razin and Efraim Sadka (w10967, December 2004, .pdf format, 19p.).

Abstract:

An income tax is generally levied on both capital and labor income. The working young bears mostly the burden of the tax on labor income, whereas the retired old, who already accumulated her savings, bears the brunt of the capital income tax. Therefore, there arise two types of conflict in the determination of the income tax: the standard intragenerational conflict between the poor and the rich, and an intergenerational conflict between the young and the old. The paper studies how aging affects the resolution of these conflicts, and the politico-economic forces that are at play: the changes in the voting pivots and the fiscal leakage from tax payers to transfer recipients.

http://www.nber.org/papers/W10967

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address for full text.

D. "Who Wins and Who Loses? Public Transfer Accounts for US Generations Born 1850 to 2090," by Antoine Bommier, Ronald Lee, Timothy Miller, and Stephane Zuber (w10969, December 2004, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

Public transfer programs in industrial nations have massive long term fiscal imbalances, and apparently permit the elderly to benefit through pension and health care programs at the cost of the young and future generations. However, the intergenerational picture is turned upside down when public education is included in generational accounts along with pensions and health care. We calculate the net present value (NPV) of benefits received minus taxes paid for US generations born 1850 to 2090, and find that all generations born from 1950 to 2050 are net gainers, while many of today's old people are net losers. Windfall gains for early generations when Social Security and Medicare started up partially offset windfall losses when public education was started, roughly consistent with the Becker-Murphy theory.

http://www.nber.org/papers/W10969

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address for full text.
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27. BOSTON COLLEGE CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH: "Nonearnings Income Migration in the United States: Anticipating the Geographical Impacts of Baby Boom Retirement," by Peter B. Nelson (WP 2004-31, December 2004, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

This paper highlights geographic regions gaining and losing investment and social security income (collectively referred to as nonearnings income) through migration of baby boomers and their predecessors. There is a consistent Rustbelt to Sunbelt shift in nonearnings income due to migration, as well as movement down the urban hierarchy into nonmetropolitan destinations. The analysis further indicates migration of those over age 55 contributes to greater levels of economic disparity across space. Regions like the Plains are losing a higher proportion of well- to-do migrants in this age group, as individuals move to high amenity destinations in the Rocky Mountains. Such destinations are likely to enjoy significant economic benefits as these new sources arrive. The places of origin, however, are left with less-well-off populations posing significant social and economic problems. In contrast, baby boomer migration appears to benefit nonmetropolitan territories in all regions, and baby boomers with higher levels of per capita economic resources appear to be responsible for these nonmetropolitan income gains.

http://www.bc.edu/centers/crr/wp_2004-31.shtml
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28. MAXWELL SCHOOL CENTER FOR POLICY RESEARCH (SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY) [SYRACUSE, NEW YORK]: "Duration Data from the National Long-Term Care Survey: Foundation for a Dynamic Multiple-Indicator Model of ADL Dependency," by James N. Laditka and Douglas A. Wolf (Working Paper 65, December 2004, .pdf format, 70p.).

Abstract:

This report describes preparation of data from the National Long-Term Care Survey (NLTCS) for use in a dynamic multiple-indicator model of dependency in Activities of Daily Living (ADLs). The data set described makes use of all functional status information available across four NLTCS waves for six ADLs, including information from screening interviews, detailed interviews in the community, and institutional interviews. Importantly, it also captures all available information elicited from respondents about the duration of any impairment in these ADLS. The data was prepared as described in this report to enable the calculation of improved estimates of the probabilities that an older individual will transition from one functional status state to another in any of six ADLS. These probabilities can then be used to improve estimates of active life expectancy.

http://www-cpr.maxwell.syr.edu/cprwps/wps65abs.htm

Click on "Click here" at the bottom of the abstract for full text.
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29. Luxembourg Income Study: "The Age Profile of Income and the Burden of Unfunded Transfers in Four Countries: Evidence from the Luxembourg Income Study," by Gary Burtless (No. 394, November 2004, .pdf format, 45p.).

Abstract:

This paper uses micro-census income data from the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) to measure the current and future burden of financing public transfers, especially benefits supporting the aged and near-aged. The analysis distinguishes between income obtained from households' own saving and labor earnings, on the one hand, and the part financed with unfunded transfers, on the other. The burden of unfunded transfers is defined as the tax on factor income that is needed to pay for such transfers under a balanced budget rule. The paper develops a framework for estimating and forecasting this burden using micro-census reports on the current age distribution of factor incomes, the age distribution of transfer incomes, and U.S. Census Bureau projections of the future age structure of the population. Because survey data are inaccurate and incomplete, the micro-census income reports are adjusted to reflect underreporting based on estimates of aggregate income from the national income and product accounts. Empirical estimates of current and future tax burdens are derived for four OECD countries. These show that the burden of German and U.S. transfers is unusually sensitive to the effects of an aging population. In contrast, the burden of public transfers in Finland and Britain is less sensitive to the effects of an older population because transfers in those countries are less heavily tilted toward aged beneficiaries. Factor incomes received by aged Americans are high by international standards, providing a partial offset to the sharp tilt of U.S. transfers in favor of the elderly. As the U.S. population grows older, factor incomes will decline more gradually than is the case in other rich countries, helping to maintain the size of its tax base

http://www.lisproject.org/publications/liswps/394.pdf
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30. CESifo (CENTER FOR ECONOMIC STUDIES (CES) AND THE IFO INSTITUTE FOR ECONOMIC RESEARCH [UNIVERSITY OF MUNICH, GERMANY]): "Fertility, Mortality, and the Developed World's Demographic Transition," by Hans Fehr, Sabine Jokisch, and Laurence Kotlikoff (Working Paper 1326, November 2004, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

This study uses Fehr, Jokisch, and Kotlikoff's (2004a) dynamic general equilibrium model to analyze the effects of changes in fertility and mortality on the developed world's demographic transition. The model features three regions-- the U.S., Japan, and the EU-15--and incorporates age- and time-specific fertility and mortality rates, detailed fiscal institutions, and international capital mobility, subject to adjustment costs. Our simulations confirm the offsetting fiscal and economic consequences of both higher fertility and lower mortality rates. The simulations indicate very minor effects on the developed world's rather bleak baseline transition path from either major increases in fertility rates or major reductions in mortality rates.

http://www.cesifo.de/pls/portal30/CESIFO_APPS.WORKING_PAPERS_ABSTRACT.show?p_arg_names=p_file_id&p_arg_values=9381
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31. BRUNEL UNIVERSITY [UXBRIDGE, MIDDLESEX, UK]: "Is There a Link Between Pension-Fund Assets and Economic Growth? - A Cross-Country Study," by E Philip Davis and Yuwei Hu (December 2004, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

Pension fund assets have increased markedly during recent decades, and there are signs that this trend will continue, particularly given demographic changes and the current pattern of pension reform towards funded systems. However, research on the extent to which growth in pension assets contributes directly to economic growth is quite scarce. This is surprising since superiority of funding to pay-as-you-go links notably to the question whether funding improves economic performance sufficiently to generate the resources required to meet the needs of an ageing population. In this paper, we design a modified Cobb-Douglas production function with pension assets as a shift factor. We then employ a dataset covering 38 countries to investigate the direct link between pension assets and economic growth, using a variety of appropriate econometric methods. We find positive results for both OECD countries and Emerging Market Economies (EMEs), with some evidence for a larger effect for EMEs than OECD countries.

http://www.brunel.ac.uk/depts/ecf/research/papers/04-23.PDF
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32. LUND UNIVERSITY [SWEDEN] DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS: "Pensions and External Effects of Ageing; Effects on Distribution," by Agneta Kruse and Kristian Nyberg (2004, .pdf format, 22p.).

Abstract:

Ageing gives rise to concern about the sustainability of pay-as-you-go pension systems. One reform option suggested is to make the system actuarial by a tight connection between contributions and benefits. The incentives for the individual will then coincide with the interest of the pension collective. However, the individual actions--fertility decisions, working hours, timing of retirement--also contain a collective part not taken into consideration in the individual's utility maximisation, a 1/N problem. As pay-as you-go systems are indexed by growth, the index (rate of return) is influenced by these actions even if the system is 'actuarially fair'. We trace the effects of changes in fertility and early exit/changes in working hours on different generations in an overlapping generation model. The economic model (a stylised model of the economy in aggregate and the pension system) is fitted into a simulation model. We show that the collective effect /external effects are far from negligible. Different measures to cope with these effects are discussed.

http://www.nek.lu.se/publications/workpap/Papers/WP04_27.pdf
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33. ASSOCIACAO NACIONAL DOS CENTROS DE POS-GRADUACAO EM ECONOMIA [BRAZIL]: "Fiscal Impacts of Social Security Reform in Brazil," by Andre Portela Souza, Helio Zylberstajn, Luis Eduardo Afonso, and Priscilla Matias Flori (2004, .pdf format, 17p.).

Abstract:

This article focuses on the reform of Social Security in Brazil, initiated in 2003. We estimate the fiscal impact of the original government proposal, as well as of the proposal approved at the House of Representatives, and the final format approved at the Senate. We also estimated both, the balancing contribution rate and the effective contribution rate, in the three phases of the reforming process. Results indicate that although the final impact was considerably reduced from the initial project, a great deal of progress has been made towards both, the reduction of annual Social Security deficit and its transformation into a more equitable system.

http://www.anpec.org.br/encontro2004/artigos/A04A138.pdf

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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

34. Age and Ageing (Vol. 34, No. 1, January 2005)

http://ageing.oupjournals.org/content/vol34/issue1/index.dtl?etoc

35. Journal of Aging and Health (Vol. 17, No. 1, February 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://jah.sagepub.com/content/vol17/issue1/?etoc

36. Journals of Gerontology (A) Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences (Vols. 59, Nos. 11, November 2004. Note: Full electronic text of these journals are available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and these issues.

http://biomed.gerontologyjournals.org/content/vol59/issue11/?etoc
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37. INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search"
C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button
D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button, and click "Search"
E. View the table of contents for the issue noted

Health and Social Work (Vol. 29, No. 4, 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.
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38. AMEDEO MEDICAL LITERATURE: Note: "AMEDEO has been created to serve the needs of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, other members of the health professions, and patients and their friends. They can easily access timely, relevant information within their respective fields... All AMEDEO services are free of charge. This policy was made possible thanks to generous unrestricted educational grants provided by AMGEN, Berlex, Eisai, Glaxo Wellcome, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Schering AG."

A. Osteoporosis: Literature for the week of Dec. 16, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ost.htm

B. Alzheimer's Disease: Literature for the week of Dec. 16, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ad.htm

C. Parkinson's Disease: Literature for the week of Dec. 16, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/pd.htm

D. Prostate Cancer: Literature for the week of Dec. 16, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/prc.htm

E. Stem Cell Research: Literature for the week of Dec. 16, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/stc/stc1.htm

F. Opthamology: Literature for the week of Dec. 16, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/eye.htm

AMADEO Literature Guide:

http://www.amedeo.com/index.htm

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V. Books:

39. ANMOL PUBLICATIONS/INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT [LUCKNOW, INDIA]: _ Aged in India: The Struggle to Survive_, edited by J.P. Yadav (2004, ISBN 8126119713 (Set), 2 vols, 545p. total).

http://tinyurl.com/4azrj

Table of Contents:

http://www.kkagencies.com/toc/32866.htm

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VI. Funding Opportunities:

40. NIH:

A. "Research on Mind-Body Interactions and Health" (US National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with several other agencies, PA-05-027, Dec. 10, 2004). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-05-027.html

B. "Reminder of Financial Conflict of Interest Requirements for All NIH-Supported Institutions" (NIH Notice NOT-OD-05-013, Dec. 6, 2004).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-05-013.html

C. "NIH Establishes Website for New Investigators" (NIH Notice NOT-OD-05-014, Dec. 10, 2004).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-OD-05-014.html

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VII. Conferences:

41. CONFERENCALERTS.COM: Conferencealerts.com has recently updated its Gerontology section:

http://www.conferencealerts.com/aging.htm
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VIII. Legislation Information Updates:

42. US HOUSE ENERGY AND COMMERCE COMMITTEE HEARING PUBLICATION: "Keeping Seniors Healthy: New Perspective Benefits in the Medicare Modernization Act," a hearing held Sep. 21, 2004 (House Serial Publication 108-117, ASCII text and .pdf format, 86p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house05ch108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-117" (without the quotes). Note: If the .pdf formatted document does not resolve, try the browser "refresh" button.
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43. US SENATE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON AGING HEARING PUBLICATIONS:

A."Medicaid in Crisis: Could Long Term Care Partnerships be Part of the Solution?" a hearing held Jun. 22, 2004 (Senate Hearing 108-664, Serial Publication 108-38, ASCII text and .pdf format, 84p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/senate/senate22sh108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-664" (without the quotes). Note: If the .pdf formatted document does not resolve, try the browser "refresh" button.

B. "Strengthening Social Security: What Can Personal Retirement Accounts Do for Low-Income Workers?" a hearing held Jun. 15, 2004 (Senate Hearing 108-641, Serial Publication 108-37, ASCII text and .pdf format, 116p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/senate/senate22sh108.html

Scroll to or "find in page" "108-641" (without the quotes). Note: If the .pdf formatted document does not resolve, try the browser "refresh" button.

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IX. Websites of Interest:

44. SAGE CROSSROADS UPDATE: Sage Crossroads (discussed in CAAR #265, Dec. 2, 2004--http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar/caar265-dec-2-2004.htm [item 39]) has been updated with the Webcast of an interview with James W. Vaupel on "Plasticity of Longevity" (video capability is required to view the webcast, running time: 59 minutes 42 seconds). A print transcript will be available at the site in the near future. "Experts in longevity science disagree on predictions for life-span in the 21st century. Will we continue to grow older or will life-span begin to shorten? Obesity and infectious diseases have been cited as potential limits, however some say we can expect life-span to continue to grow as it has. Dr. Vaupel... discuss[es] his research on negative senescence and the plasticity of longevity. "

http://www.sagecrossroads.net/public/webcasts/21/

Click the right arrow button (start) under the black screen to access the webcast.

Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology and Center for
Demography of Health and Aging
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu