Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #265--December 2, 2004

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CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar.html

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I. Data:

1. CENSUS BUREAU/AOA: The US Census Bureau has compiled the Special Tabulation on Aging (Part A: Population Characteristics) for the US Administration on Aging. The tabulation (available in Microsoft Excel format via a web-based extractor) along with technical documentation (.pdf format, 436p.) is available at the site. CD-ROM or DVD copies of the data are available from the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) at the University of Michigan. See the below listed Internet address for contact information.

http://www.aoa.gov/prof/Statistics/Tab/specialtab.htm
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2. UK DATA ARCHIVE [UNIVERSITY OF ESSEX, COLCHESTER]: Note: There may be restrictions and costs associated with UK Data Archive data. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/orderingData/introduction.asp

Transport and Ageing: Extending Quality of Life for Older People Via Public and Private Transport, 2000-2001 (#5035)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/search/indexSearch.asp?ct=xmlSn&q1=5035
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3. ICPSR: The Inter-University Consortium for Political and Economic Research at the University of Michigan has announced: "ICPSR Changes File Compression Format." "ICPSR has converted the compression format of its files from Gzip to WinZip. Formerly, our data files were compressed using GNU Gzip data compression software and had the .gz file name extension. Beginning November 29, all files are compacted using Windows Zip compression and will bear the .zip file name extension."

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/org/announce.html#unzip
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4. Missouri Census Data Center: "Rx: A Cure for the Common Codes" (University of Missouri) Update: "The United States page with geographic codes for the entire country, which is part of the Cure for the Common Codes (CCC) web application, has been added to the site. The site was originally discussed in the Nov. 18, 2004 issue of CAAR (#263--http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar/caar263-nov-18-2004.htm), item no. 2.

http://mcdc2.missouri.edu/webrepts/commoncodes/

Click on "United States".
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5. MEXICAN HEALTH AND AGING STUDY: "MHAS 2003 Data and 2003 Imputations, as well as MHAS 2003 Questionnaires and Imputations for 2001 Economic Variables are now available at the MHAS website at the University of Pennsylvania. Users must register before access to data is provided. "The Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS) is a prospective panel study of health and aging in Mexico. MHAS is supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health/ National Institute on Aging (AG 18016, B.J. Soldo, P.I.). The study is a collaborative effort among researchers from the Universities of Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Wisconsin in the U.S., and the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica, Geografia e Informatica (INEGI) in Mexico."

http://www.ssc.upenn.edu/mhas/english/home.htm
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6. LIS ANNOUNCEMENT: "New approach for missing values." (Luxembourg Income Study, November 20014). For more information see:

http://www.lisproject.org/techdoc/wave5change.htm#missing
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II. Reports and articles:

7. _DEMOGRAPHIC RESEARCH_ ARTICLE: "A Method for Estimating Size of Population Aged 90 and over with Application to the U.S. Census 2000 Data," by Kirill F. Andreev (Vol. 11, Article 9, November 2004, .pdf format, p. 236-262). NOTE: If there are problems downloading this article, please use the contact information on the main _DR_ page (bottom left side of the page) and not the author of the article.

Abstract:

In many countries population estimates are unreliable at higher ages. In this article a method for producing an independent estimate of population aged 90+ from data on deaths and population estimates at lower ages is developed. The method builds on an indirect mortality estimate from deaths only and on an estimate of rate of mortality change. Theoretical foundation and bias expected on application of this procedure to the real data are discussed as well. Testing of this method on accurate demographic data shows its superiority over available procedures. The method has been applied to the evaluation of size of population 90+ in the census 2000 of the United States. The results show a high degree of agreement between two estimates, but the possibility of slight overestimation of males in census data cannot be completely ruled out. To facilitate the application of this method, a computer program is provided as well.

http://www.demographic-research.org/

Click on "Enter".
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8. CDC REPORT: "The State of Aging and Health in America 2004" (US Centers for Disease Control, 2004, .pdf format, 36p.). "This report assesses the health status and health behaviors of U.S. adults aged 65 and older, and makes recommendations to improve the mental and physical health of all Americans in their later years."

http://www.cdc.gov/aging/pdf/State_of_Aging_and_Health_in_America_2004.pdf
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9. MEDPAC TRANSCRIPTS: "The Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, "an independent federal body established by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997...to advise the U.S. Congress on issues affecting the Medicare program" has made available transcripts of its meetings going back to June 2002 (.pdf format).

http://www.medpac.gov/public_meetings/transcripts.cfm?sid=3&subid=0

MEDPAC:

http://www.medpac.gov/
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10. AOA NEWSLETTER: "AoA e-News" (US Administration on Aging, November 2004, HTML, .pdf, and Microsoft Word format, 10p.).

http://www.aoa.dhhs.gov/press/enewsletter/enewsletter.asp
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11. CMS REQUEST FOR COMMENT, DECISION MEMORANDUM:

A. "CMS Seeks Public Comment On Standardized Quality Measures" (US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Nov. 16, 2004).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=1259

B. "CAL Tracking Sheet for Lipid and Blood Glucose Testing (Modification of Code List to Implement Screening Benefit Added by Medicare Modernization Act (MMA) (CAG-00266N)" (Nov. 29, 2004).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/mcd/viewtrackingsheet.asp?id=140

Click on "11/29/2004" next to "Decision Memo Released" near the bottom of the page for link to memorandum.
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12. DHHS OIG AUDIT REPORT: "Oversight and Evaluation of the Fiscal Year 2004 Hospital Payment Monitoring Program" (US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Inspector General, Audit Report A-03-04-00008, November 2004, .pdf format, 5p.).

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oas/reports/region3/30400008.pdf
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13. GAO CORRESPONDENCE: "Medicare Chemotherapy Payments: New Drug and Administration Fees Are Closer to Providers' Costs" (US Government Accountability Office GAO-05-142R, December 2004, .pdf format, 18p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05142r.pdf

Note: This is a temporary address. GAO correspondence may be available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
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14. NIH NEWS RELEASE: "How Are We Doing? Researchers Aim to Measure National Well Being" (US National Institutes of Health, Dec. 2, 2004).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/dec2004/nia-02.htm
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15. SSA OP REPORTS:

A. "OASDI Monthly Statistics, October 2004," (US Social Security Administration, Office of Policy, November 2004, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/statcomps/oasdi_monthly/2004-10/index.html

B. "SSI Monthly Statistics, October 2004," (US Social Security Administration, Office of Policy, November 2004, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/statcomps/ssi_monthly/2004-10/index.html
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16. _MLR_ ARTICLE: "Measuring defined benefit replacement rates with PenSync," by James H. Moore, Jr. (US Bureau of Labor Statistics, _Monthly Labor Review_, Vol. 127, No. 11, November 2004, .pdf format, p. 57-68).

Abstract:

A synthetic pension data set created with regression and statistical matching procedures utilizes IRS data to evaluate the effectiveness of a defined benefit pension plan in meeting the income needs of retirees; the findings suggest that variations in replacement rates stem from differences in benefit formulas, earnings, years in the plan, and employment characteristics.

http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2004/11/art6abs.htm
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17. AARP REPORT. PRIME TIME RADIO, ANNOUNCEMENT:

A. "Sources of Income for Older Persons in 2002" (AARP Public Policy Institute, November 2004, .pdf format, 6p.).

http://research.aarp.org/econ/dd104_income.html

Click on "Download or View" at the bottom of the page for full text.

B. The following AARP _Prime Time Radio_ show, for Nov. 16 - Nov. 23 2004, is now available (RealPlayer plug-in or helper application required, audio transcripts run between 24 and 30 minutes).

Nov. 23, 2004--Images of Aging

http://www.aarp.org/leisure/radio/pt/

C. "A Long-Term Care Ombudsman on Your Side" (Nov. 30, 2004).

http://www.aarp.org/life/caregiving/Articles/a2004-11-30-ombudsman.html
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18. FCA REPORT: "State of the States in Family Caregiver Support: A 50-State Study," by Lynn Friss Feinberg, Sandra L. Newman, Leslie Gray, Karen N. Kolb, and Wendy Fox-Grage, (Family Caregiver Alliance, November 2004, .pdf format, 319p.).

http://www.caregiver.org/caregiver/jsp/content_node.jsp?nodeid=1276

News release:

http://www.caregiver.org/caregiver/jsp/content_node.jsp?nodeid=1277

More information on FCA:

http://www.caregiver.org/caregiver/jsp/content_node.jsp?nodeid=349
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19. BOSTON COLLEGE CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH ISSUE BRIEF: "A Bird's Eye View of the Social Security Debate," by Alicia H. Munnell (IB 25, December 2004, .pdf format, 9p.).

http://www.bc.edu/centers/crr/ib_25.shtml
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20. SCIENCE ADVISORY BOARD PERSPECTIVES ARTICLE: "The Future of Human Health and Longevity," by Leonid A. Gavrilov (2004).

http://www.scienceboard.net/community/perspectives.125.html

More information on SAB:

http://www.scienceboard.net/about/
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21. POPULATION REFERENCE BUREAU ARTICLES:

A. "Why Do Canadians Outlive Americans?" by Barbara Boyle Torrey and Carl Haub (November 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/04_Articles/Why_Do_Canadians_Outlive_Americans_.htm

B. "The Lives and Times of the Baby Boomers," by Mary Elizabeth Hughes and Angela M. O'Rand (October 2004).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/04_Articles/The_Lives_and_Times_of_the_Baby_Boomers.htm
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22. _PNAS_ COMMENTARY EXTRACT: "Postmenopausal osteoporosis, T cells, and immune dysfunction," by Steven L. Teitelbaum (_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_, Vol. 101, No. 48, Nov. 30, 2004, p. 16711-16712).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/extract/101/48/16711?etoc
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23. _JAMA_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT, EDITORIAL EXTRACT:

A. "Thyroid Status, Disability and Cognitive Function, and Survival in Old Age," by Jacobijn Gussekloo, Eric van Exel, Anton J.M. de Craen, Arend E. Meinders, Marijke Frolich, and Rudi G.J. Westendorp (_Journal of the American Medical Association_, Vol. 292, No.21, Dec. 1, 2004, p. 2591-2599).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/292/21/2591

B. "Thyroid Disease in the Oldest Old: The Exception to the Rule," by David S. Cooper (_Journal of the American Medical Association_ Editorial, Vol. 292, No.21, Dec. 1, 2004, p. 2651-2654).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/extract/292/21/2651
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24. _NEJM_ BOOK REVIEW EXTRACT: "How Healthy Are We? A National Study of Well-Being at Midlife," by Sarita Bhalotra, a review of _Studies on Successful Midlife Development_, edited by Orville Gilbert Brim, Carol D. Ryff, and Ronald C. Kessler (687 pp. Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 2004. $42. ISBN 0-226-07475-7) (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 351, No. 23, Dec. 2, 2004, p. 2460-2461).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/extract/351/23/2460
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25. _BMJ_ NEWS EXTRA: " NICE [National Institute for Clinical Excellence] issues guideline to prevent falls in elderly people," by Susan Mayor (_British Medical Journal_, Vol. 329, No. 7477, Nov. 27, 2004, p. 1258).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/329/7477/1258-e
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26. _TIME_ ARTICLE: "Brain scans suggest a link between dementia and long-term obesity," by Sanjay Gupta (_Time_, Vol. 164, No. 23, Dec. 6, 2004).

http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1101041206-832190,00.html

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III. Working Papers:

27. RAND CORPORATION LABOR AND POPULATION PROGRAM: "Health and Wealth of Elderly Couples: Causality Tests Using Dynamic Panel Data Models," by Pierre-Carl Michaud, Arthur van Soest (WP-191, September 2004, .pdf format, 47p.)

Abstract:

A positive relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and health, the so-called "health-wealth gradient", is repeatedly found in most industrialized countries with similar levels of health care technology and economic welfare. This study analyzes causality from health to wealth (health causation) and from wealth to health (wealth or social causation) for elderly couples in the US. Using six biennial waves of couples aged 51-61 in 1992 from the Health and Retirement Study, we compare the recently developed strategy using Granger causality tests of Adams et al. (2003, Journal of Econometrics) with tests for causality in dynamic panel data models incorporating unobserved heterogeneity. While Adams et al. tests reject the hypothesis of no causality from wealth to husband's or wife's health, the tests in the dynamic panel data model do not provide evidence of wealth-health causality. On the other hand, both methodologies lead to strong evidence of causal effects from both spouses' health on household wealth.

http://www.rand.org/publications/WR/WR191/

Click on "PDF" for full text.
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28. INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF LABOR (IZA) [UNIVERSITY OF BONN, GERMANY]: "European Labour Mobility: Challenges and Potentials," by Klaus F. Zimmermann (Discussion Paper 1410, November 2004, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

European Union economies are pressed by (i) a demographic change that induces population ageing and a decline of the workforce, and (ii) a split labour market that is characterized by high levels of unemployment for low-skilled people and a simultaneous shortage of skilled workers. This lack of flexible high-skilled workers and the ageing process has created the image of an immobile labour force and the eurosklerosis phenomenon. In such a situation, an economically motivated immigration policy at the European level can generate welfare improvements. A selective policy that discourages unskilled migrants and attracts skilled foreign workers will vitalize the labour market, foster growth and increase demand for unskilled native workers. The paper summarizes the available economic insights, and suggests (i) the need to harmonize the single-country migration policies across Europe and (ii) that the European Union needs to become an active player on the international labour markets.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1410.pdf
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29. Melbourne [Australia] Institute:

A. "Assessing Age Pension Options: Public Opinion in Australia 1994 - 2001 with Comparisons to Finland and Poland," by M. D.R. Evans and Jonathan Kelley (Working Paper 21/2004, September 2004, .pdf format, 66p.).

Abstract:

This working paper assesses Australians' views on alternative old age pension systems. We find that a no-pension system is very unpopular (28 points out of 100, on average), and a universal pension system fairly popular (62 points, on average), with other systems in between. The current catchment of the current system was not asked about directly in the existing data, but forecasts of its likely rating, based on interpolation between the ratings of the other systems suggest that it would draw ratings of around 55, on average. The existing data do not include any variations in age at access, which ought to be inquired about in future research, because varying that might accommodate goals of containing or reducing spending with public preference for widespread access. Our temporal analysis found no trends between 1993 and 2000 in ratings of any of the alternative pension systems, so the universal age pension still remains the most popular option. Our multivariate analysis found little sign of self-interest in attitudes towards old age income systems: age, occupation, income, and workforce participation do not have important influences on these attitudes, and the education and gender effects do not support a self-interest interpretation. Instead, attitudes towards old age income systems are linked to other political attitudes - to party preferences and to attitudes towards general consumer subsidies. Ideals about the provision of old age income appear to be strongly shaped by other aspects of political ideology, and only lightly touched by self-interest.

http://www.ecom.unimelb.edu.au/iaesrwww/wp/wp2004n21.pdf

B. "Accounting for Population Ageing in Tax Microsimulation Modelling by Survey Reweighting," by Lixin Cai, John Creedy and Guyonne Kalb (Working Paper 26/2004, September 2004, .pdf format, 28p.).

Abstract:

This paper investigates the use of sample reweighting in a behavioural tax microsimulation model, to examine the implications for government taxes and expenditure of population ageing in Australia. First, a calibration approach to sample reweighting is described, producing new weights which achieve specified population totals for selected variables, subject to the constraint that there are minimal adjustments to the weights. Second, the performance of the Australian Bureau of Statistics~R (ABS) weights provided with the 2001 Survey of Income and Housing Cost (SIHC) was examined and it was found that reweighting does not improve the simulation outcomes for the 2001 situation, so the original ABS weights were retained for 2001. Third, the implications of changes in the age distribution of the population were examined, based on population projections to 2050. A 'pure' change in the age distribution was examined by keeping the aggregate population size fixed and changing only the relative frequencies in different age-gender groups. Finally, the effects of a policy change to benefit taper rates in Australia were compared for 2001 and 2050 population weights. It is suggested that this type of exercise provides an insight into the implications of changes in the population on government income tax revenue and social security expenditure, indicating likely pressures for policy changes.

http://www.ecom.unimelb.edu.au/iaesrwww/wp/wp2004n26.pdf
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30. National Bank of Belgium: "Voting on pensions: a survey," by Gregory de Walque (Working Paper No. 62, October 2004, .pdf format, 50p.).

Abstract:

The paper presents a non-exhaustive survey of the literature designed to explain emergence, size and political sustainability of pay-as-you-go pension systems. It proposes a simple framework of analysis (a small open two overlapping generation economy model), around which some variants are displayed. Dictatorship of the median voter is assumed. The text is organized to answer the following questions: (i) do political equilibria with PAYG pension schemes exist, (ii) why do they emerge, (iii) what are the conditions for the participation constraint of the pension game to be verified, and finally (iv) what is the size of the pension system chosen by the median voter and how is this size influenced by an exogenous (e.g. demographic) shock.

http://www.nbb.be/Sg/En/Produits/publication/working/WP62.pdf
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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

31. American Journal of Public Health (Vol. 94, No. 12, December 2004). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library and the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of these databases and this issue.

http://www.ajph.org/content/vol94/issue12/?etoc

32. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (Vol. 52, Supplement 12, December 2004).

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=showIssues&code=jgs

Click on "December 2004" (Vol. 52, Issue S12).

33. Jounals of Gerontology (B): Psychological and Social Sciences (Vols. 59, Nos. 6, November 2004). Note: Full electronic text of these journals is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of these databases and these issues.

http://psychsoc.gerontologyjournals.org/content/vol59/issue6/?etoc
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34. AMEDEO MEDICAL LITERATURE: Note: "AMEDEO has been created to serve the needs of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, other members of the health professions, and patients and their friends. They can easily access timely, relevant information within their respective fields... All AMEDEO services are free of charge. This policy was made possible thanks to generous unrestricted educational grants provided by AMGEN, Berlex, Eisai, Glaxo Wellcome, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Schering AG."

A. Osteoporosis: Literature for the week of Dec. 1, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ost.htm

B. Alzheimer's Disease: Literature for the week of Dec. 1, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ad.htm

C. Parkinson's Disease: Literature for the week of Dec. 1, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/pd.htm

D. Prostate Cancer: Literature for the week of Dec. 1, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/prc.htm

AMADEO Literature Guide:

http://www.amedeo.com/index.htm

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V. Funding Opportunities:

35. NIH:

A. "Alzheimer's Disease Pilot Clinical Trials" (PAR-05-021, US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with one other agency, Nov. 23, 2004). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-05-021.html

B. "R21 Grants for Alzheimer's Disease Drug Discovery" (PAS-05-022, US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with other agencies, Nov. 24, 2004). For more information see:

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-05-022.html
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36. JOHN A. HARTFORD FOUNDATION/AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY FOUNDATION FOR HEALTH IN AGING: "2005 Hartford Geriatrics Health Outcomes Research Scholars Awards Program." For more information, including application information and deadlines, see:

http://www.healthinaging.org

Click on "Click here" under "2005 Hartford Outcomes Awards Program".

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VI. Conferences:

37. NIH: "NIH State-of-the-Science Conference on Improving End-of-Life Care," a conference to be held Dec. 6-8, 2004, in Bethesda, Maryland. For more information, including registration information, see:

http://consensus.nih.gov/ta/024/endoflifeintro.html
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38. NIA: "US National Institute on Aging Summer Institute on Aging Research," to be held in Queenstown, Maryland, Jul. 9-15, 2005. For more information see:

http://www.nia.nih.gov/ResearchInformation/ConferencesAndMeetings/SummerInstitute.htm
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VII. Websites of Interest:

39. SAGE CROSSROADS: "SAGE Crossroads is the premier online forum for emerging issues of human aging. The onset of the senior boom, coupled with new discoveries in aging-related science and technology is setting the stage for great debate on medical interventions and longevity science. SAGE Crossroads aims to be the balanced, "go-to" site for those interested in engaging in lively discussions about the ethical, political, economic, and societal implications of aging-related science. At SAGE Crossroads, visitors will be able to watch, listen and, most importantly, interact with prominent experts in the field of aging." At present the content of the site consists of two sections: "News and Views" (articles relevant to the topic) and webcasts ("live debates featuring prominent experts in aging-related research and policy. Topics to be explored include: the ethical debate of modifying human nature; tomorrow's healthcare system; and the economics of staying old longer."). The next webcast "2004 Elections: How will they impact old age policies?" is scheduled for Nov. 29, 2004, followed by "Plasticity of Longevity: Interview with Dr. James Vaupel," Dec. 14, 2004). Transcripts as well as inline video are available.

http://www.sagecrossroads.net/public/

Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology and Center for
Demography of Health and Aging
4470 Social Science University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu