Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #221--January 22, 2004

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CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar.html

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I. Data:

1. ICPSR: The Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to researchers in aging. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Current Population Survey: Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Survey, 2003 (#3912)

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu:8080/ICPSR-STUDY/03912.xml

Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS), 1998-2000 (#3891)

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu:8080/ICPSR-STUDY/03891.xml
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2. NCI SEER: The US National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Result (SEER) program has released US population data at the county, state, and national level for: 1969-2001, Races: White, Black, Non-White; 1990-2001, Expanded Races: White, Black, American Indian/Alaska Native, Asian/Pacific Islander; and 1990-2001, Hispanic: White Non-Hispanic, White Hispanic, Non-White Non-Hispanic, Non-White Hispanic (self decompressing [.exe] ASCII format). The data dictionary is available in .pdf format. Population data are available by sex and age (age 0, 1-4, 5-9 ... 80-84, 85+ and all ages.

http://seer.cancer.gov/popdata/download.html

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II. Reports and articles:

3. SSA REPORT, ISSUE PAPER:

A. "International Update, December 2003," (US Social Security Administration, Office of Policy, January 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 4p.).

http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/progdesc/intl_update/2003-12/index.html

B. "Treatment of Married Couples in the SSI Program," (US Social Security Administration, Office of Policy, Issue Paper No. 2003-01, December 2003, .pdf and HTML format, 15p.).

HTML: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/issuepapers/ip2003-01.html

PDF: http://www.socialsecurity.gov/policy/docs/issuepapers/ip2003-01.pdf
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4. CMMS PAYMENT RATES: "Medicare Advantage Payment Rates Information (Medicare+Choice; AAPCC)," (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, January 2004, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/healthplans/rates/

Press Release:

http://www.cmms.gov/media/press/release.asp?Counter=944
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5. CDC MMWR: "Strength Training Among Adults Aged > 65 Years -- United States, 2001," (Centers for Disease Control, Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol. 53, No. 2, January 23, 2004, .pdf and HTML format, p. 25-28).

HTML:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5302a1.htm

PDF:
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5302.pdf
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6. PENSION ADVISORY SERVICE [UK] REPORT: "OPAS report on pension wind up issues and concerns during 2003," (Pension Advisory Service, January 22, 2004, HTML format).

http://www.opas.org.uk/NewsPage/index.htm
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7. _PNAS_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT: "Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer," Jacques Lapointe, Chunde Li, John P. Higgins, Matt van de Rijn, Eric Bair, Kelli Montgomery, Michelle Ferrari, Lars Egevad, Walter Rayford, Ulf Bergerheim, Peter Ekman, Angelo M. DeMarzo, Robert Tibshirani, David Botstein, Patrick O. Brown, James D. Brooks, and Jonathan R. Pollack (_Proceeding of the National Academy of Sciences_, Vol. 101, No. 3, January 20, 2004, .pdf and HTML format, p. 811-816).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/101/3/811
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8. _JAMA_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT: "Coronary Artery Calcium Score Combined With Framingham Score for Risk Prediction in Asymptomatic Individuals," by Philip Greenland, Laurie LaBree, Stanley P. Azen, Terence M. Doherty, and Robert C. Detrano (_Journal of American Medical Association_, Vol. 291, No. 2, January 14, 2004, .pdf and HTML format, p. 210-215).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/291/2/210
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9. _BMJ_ EDITORIAL: "Long term cognitive dysfunction in older people after non-cardiac surgery," by Amber Selwood and Martin Orrell (_British Medical Journal_, Vol. 328, No. 7432, January 17, 2004, .pdf and HTML format, p. 120-121).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/328/7432/120
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10. _LANCET_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT: Note: _Lancet_ requires free registration before providing content. "Prediction of total and hip fracture risk in men and women by quantitative ultrasound of the calcaneus: EPIC-Norfolk prospective population study," by Kay-Tee Khaw, Jonathan Reeve, Robert Luben, Sheila Bingham, Ailsa Welch, Nicholas Wareham, Suzy Oakes, and Nicholas Day (_Lancet_, Vol. 363, No. 9404, January 17, 2004, .pdf and HTML format, p. 197-202).

http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol363/iss9404/abs/llan.363.9404.original_research.28362.1
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11. _MEDSCAPE_ ARTICLES: Note: Medscape requires free registration before providing articles.

A. "Diet and Alzheimer's Disease: What the Evidence Shows," by Martha Clare Morris (_Medscape General Medicine_, Vol. 6, No. 1, 2004).

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/466037

B. "Measuring the Quality of Diabetes Care for Older American Indians and Alaska Natives," by Yvette Roubideaux, Dedra Buchwald, Janette Beals, Spero Manson, Denise Middlebrook, Ben Muneta, Steve Rith-Najarian, Ray Shields, and Kelly Acton (_American Journal of Public Health_, Vol. 94, No. 1, 2004, p. 60-66, via Medscape).

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/466777
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12. WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM REPORT: "Living Happily Ever After: The Economic Implications for Aging Societies," (World Economic Forum, January 2004, .pdf format, 31p.). Note: This is the link to the Executive Summary.

http://www.weforum.org/pdf/Initiatives/pension_report_2004.pdf

For links to individual country reports go to:

http://www.weforum.org/site/homepublic.nsf/Content/Pension+Reform+Task+Force%5CPension+Report+2004
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13. ADEAR NEWSLETTER: "Connections," (Alzheimer's Disease Education and Referral Center, Vol. 11, No. 3/4, 2003, .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.alzheimers.org/pubs/conv11n3and4.htm
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14. ILCUSA REPORT: "ILC Policy Report," (International Longevity Center, USA, January 2004, .pdf format, 6p.). The ILC Policy Report is "a monthly compilation of longevity news and trends in the U.S. and abroad."

http://www.ilcusa.org/_lib/pdf/ilc200401.pdf
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15. MICHIGAN RETIREMENT RESEARCH CENTER NEWSLETTER: "MRRC Newsletter," (Vol. 5, No. 1, January 2004, HTML and .pdf format, 12p.).

http://www.mrrc.isr.umich.edu/content.cfm?section=publications&content=index&producttypeid=0
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16. AARP _PRIME TIME RADIO_: The following AARP _Prime Time Radio_ shows, covering Jan. 1, - Jan. 13, 2004, are now available (RealPlayer plug-in or helper application required, audio transcripts run between 24 and 30 minutes).

Jan. 13, 2004: Battling Books A History and More
Jan. 13, 2004: Health Advice From One Of The Best
Jan. 5, 2004: Consumer Behavior The Inside Scoop
Jan. 5, 2004: In search Of Grace

http://www.aarp.org/leisure/radio/pt/

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III. Working Papers:

17. SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY CENTER FOR POLICY RESEARCH [MAXWELL SCHOOL]: "Informal Information Sharing and the Demand for Health Insurance among the Elderly," by Eldar Beiseitov, Jeffrey D. Kubik, and John R. Moran (CPR Working Paper Series No. 58, December 2003, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the 1998 Wave of the Health and Retirement Study, we document the role of informal information sharing, also known as social learning, on the health insurance decisions of the elderly. We find that more information sharing, as proxied by contacts with friends and neighbors, reduces the likelihood of enrolling in a Medicare managed care plan relative to purchasing a medigap policy or having coverage through Medicare alone. Our results suggest that informal informational networks are an important determinant of the health insurance choices of the elderly and that word-of mouth information sharing may have played a role in the preference of some seniors for fee-for-service insurance over managed care. Our findings are also consistent with the view that formal sources of information may have been less effective than originally hoped because they fail to capture the kind of soft information exchanged in informal settings or because people are more likely to believe reports from friends and neighbors. However, if formal information were to become more widely accepted, our results suggest that multiplier effects created by social networks could potentially allow quality ratings to be distributed in a more cost-effective manner through geographic targeting.

http://www-cpr.maxwell.syr.edu/cprwps/pdf/wp58.pdf
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18. NBER:

A. "Employees' Investment Decisions about Company Stock," by James J. Choi, David Laibson, Brigitte Madrian, and Andrew Metrick (National Bureau of Economic Research w10228, January 2004, .pdf format, 21p.).

Abstract:

We study the relationship between past returns on a company's stock and the level of investment in that stock by the participants in that company's 401(k) plan. Using data on 94,191 plan participants, we analyze several different decision points: the initial fraction of savings allocated to company stock, the changes in this fraction, and the reallocations of portfolio holdings across different asset classes. Like Benartzi (2001), we find that high past returns on company stock induce participants to allocate more of their contributions to company stock. We also find, however, that high returns on company stock have the opposite effect on reallocations of portfolio holdings, with high returns leading to shifts away from company stock and into other forms of equity. Overall, for company stock decisions, participants in our sample appear to be momentum investors when making contribution decisions and contrarian investors when making trading decisions.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10228

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the page for full text.

B. "How Large are the Classification Errors in the Social Security Disability Award Process?" by Hugo Benitez-Silva, Moshe Buchinsky, and John Rust (National Bureau of Economic Research w10219, January 2004, .pdf format, 52p.).

Abstract:

This paper presents an audit of the multistage application and appeal process that the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) uses to determine eligibility for disability benefits from the Disability Insurance (DI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) programs. We study a subset of individuals from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) who applied for DI or SSI benefits between 1992 and 1996. We compare the SSA's ultimate award decision (i.e. after allowing for appeals) to the applicant's self-reported disability status. We use these data to estimate classification error rates under the hypothesis that applicants' self-reported disability status and the SSA's ultimate award decision are noisy but unbiased indicators of, a latent true disability status' indicator. We find that approximately 20% of SSI/DI applicants who are ultimately awarded benefits are not disabled, and that 60% of applicants who were denied benefits are disabled. Our analysis also yields insights into the patterns of self-selection induced by varying delays and award probabilities at various levels of the application and appeal process. We construct an optimal statistical screening rule using a subset of objective health indicators that the SSA uses in making award decisions that results in significantly lower classification error rates than does SSA's current award process.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10219

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address at the bottom of the page for full text.
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19. FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF ST. LOUIS: "Searching for Better Prospects: Endogenizing Falling Job Tenure and Private Pension Coverage," by Leora Friedberg, Michael Owyang, and Tara M. Sinclair (Working Paper 2003-38A, November 2003, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

In a recent paper, Friedberg and Owyang (2002) argue that a decline in the value of long-term jobs has reduced job tenure and thus the appeal of traditional defined benefit (DB) pensions, which reward long tenure. This paper takes a complementary view by incorporating on-the-job search, which is costly to firms which can open a vacancy only after a worker leaves. Our model suggests that firms use deferred compensation contracts like DB pensions to reduce the incidence of on-the-job search. We show that either a decline in search costs or a rise in the mean of the productivity distribution can reduce the value of deterring search and hence the use of DB pensions. This explanation is consistent with observed trends in pension structure, job tenure, and job search.

http://research.stlouisfed.org/wp/2003/2003-038.pdf
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20. FEDERAL RESERVE BOARD OF GOVERNORS: "Cash Balance Pension Plan Conversions and the New Economy," by Julia Lynn Coronado and Phillip C. Copeland (Federal Reserve Board of Governors Working Paper 2003-63, December 2003, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

Many firms that sponsor traditional defined benefit pensions have converted their plans to cash balance plans in the last ten years. Cash balance plans combine features of defined benefit (DB) and defined contribution (DC) plans, and yet their introduction has proven considerably more controversial than has the increasing popularity of DC plans. The goal of this study is to estimate a hierarchy of the influences on the decision of a firm to convert its traditional defined benefit pension plan to a cash balance plan. Our results indicate that cash balance conversions have been undertaken in competitive industries with tight labor markets and can be viewed largely as a response to better compensate a more mobile labor force. Indeed, many firms appear to increase their pension liabilities through such conversions. The results also shed light on the possible determinants of the broader shift from DB to DC pension coverage.

http://www.federalreserve.gov/pubs/feds/2003/200363/200363abs.html

Follow link to "Full paper".
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21. MCMASTER UNIVERSITY [Toronto] QUANTITATIVE STUDIES IN ECONOMICS AND POPULATION (QSEP): "Socioeconomic Influence on the Health of Older People: Estimates Based on Two Longitudinal Surveys," by Neil J. Buckley, Frank T. Denton, A. Leslie Robb, and Byron G. Spencer (QSEP Research Report No. 387, December 2003, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

There is a strong positive relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and health, but identifying the direction of causation is difficult. This study exploits the longitudinal nature of two Canadian surveys, the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics and the National Population Health Survey, to study the link from SES to health. For people aged 50 and older who are initially in good health we examine whether changes in health status over the next two to four years are related to prior SES, as represented by income and education. Although the two surveys were designed for quite different purposes the evidence they yield with respect to the probability of remaining in good health is strikingly similar. Both suggest that SES does play a role, that the differences across SES groups are quantitatively significant, that the differences increase with age, and that they are much same for men and women.

http://socserv.mcmaster.ca/qsep/p/qsep387.pdf
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22. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT MANOA ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT: "Baby Boom, Asset Market Meltdown and Liquidity Trap," by Junning Cai (EconWPA 041002, January 2004, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

A so-called asset market meltdown hypothesis predicts that baby boomers large savings will drive asset market booms that will eventually collapse because of the boomers large retirement dissavings. As good news to baby boomers, our analysis shows that this meltdown hypothesis is fundamentally flawed; and baby-boom-driven asset market booms may not necessarily collapse. However, bad news is that, in the case where meltdowns are about to happen, forward-looking baby boomers attempts to escape them will be futile and may lead the economy into a liquidity trap.

http://econwpa.wustl.edu:8089/eps/mac/papers/0401/0401002.pdf

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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

23. INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "browse by publication"
C. Click the "fax/ariel" radio button, type the Journal Name in the "by words in the title" search box and click "search".
D. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Omega (Vol. 47, No. 1, 2004).

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24. AMEDEO MEDICAL LITERATURE: Note: "AMEDEO has been created to serve the needs of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, other members of the health professions, and patients and their friends. They can easily access timely, relevant information within their respective fields... All AMEDEO services are free of charge. This policy was made possible thanks to generous unrestricted educational grants provided by AMGEN, Berlex, Eisai, Glaxo Wellcome, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Schering AG."

A. Osteoporosis: Literature for the week of January 20, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ost.htm

B. Alzheimer's Disease: Literature for the week of January 20, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ad.htm

C. Parkinson's Disease: Literature for the week of January 20, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/pd.htm

D. Prostate Cancer: Literature for the week of January 20, 2004:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/prc.htm

AMADEO Literature Guide:

http://www.amedeo.com/index.htm

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V. Funding Opportunities:

25. NIH:

A. "ELSI Regular Research Program (R01)," (US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with other agencies, PA-04-050, January 15, 2004).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-050.html

B. "ELSI Small Grant Research Program (R03)," (US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with other agencies, PA-04-051, January 15, 2004).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-051.html

C. "Banking Genetic Samples From NIA-Funded Studies Through the NIA Aged Cell Bank," (US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, NOT-AG-04-002, January 15, 2004).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-AG-04-002.html
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26. PENN STATE UNIVERSITY POPULATION RESEARCH INSTITUTE POST-DOC POSTITION: "Postdoctoral Training Program in the Demography of Aging.""The Population Research Institute at Penn State University provides postdoctoral training in the demography of aging. Funded by a training grant from the National Institute on Aging, the program is in its tenth year of existence. The training program is oriented towards postdoctoral training apprenticeships in four broad areas: 1) aging, family and the life course, 2) aging and health, 3) the formal demography of aging, and 4) the biodemography of aging. Postdoctoral fellows collaborate with program faculty in ongoing research projects and conduct independent research under the guidance of a faculty mentor." The deadline for applications is March 15, 2004.

http://www.pop.psu.edu/general/postdoc/postdoc_aging.htm

Thanks,

Charlie

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Charlie Fiss
Information Manager
Center for Demography and Ecology and
Center for Demography of Health and Aging
Rm. 4470A Social Science Bldg
1180 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1393
Phone: (608) 265-9240
Fax: (608) 262-8400
Email: fiss@ssc.wisc.edu

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