Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #22--February 24, 2000

CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar/caar-index.htm

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I. Data:

1. PSID SUPPLEMENTAL DATA: The University of Michigan Institute for Social Research Panel Study of Income Dynamics has added "the 1999 data... to the 1984,1989, 1994, and 1999 Wealth Files. Grants from the National Institute on Aging (NIA) have made possible the collection of wealth data for the PSID in 1984, 1989, 1994, and 1999."

http://www.isr.umich.edu/src/psid/suppdata.html

and click on "Wealth Files..." in the left frame of the screen.
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2. CENSUS BUREAU: The Census Bureau has released Census 2000 Dress Rehearsal Hundred Percent Summary Files on CD-ROM.

Press Release:

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/2000/cb00cn10.html

CD-ROM Information, including pricing and ordering information:

http://www.census.gov/mp/www/rom/msrom20b.html
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II. Reports and articles

3. _JAMA_ ARTICLES AND EDITORIAL:

A. "Estrogen Replacement Therapy for Treatment of Mild to Moderate Alzheimer Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial," by Ruth A. Mulnard; Carl W. Cotman; Claudia Kawas; Christopher H. van Dyck; Mary Sano; Rachelle Doody; Elizabeth Koss; Eric Pfeiffer; Shelia Jin; Anthony Gamst; Michael Grundman; Ronald Thomas; Leon J. Thal; for the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study (_Journal of the American Medical Association_, Feb. 23, 2000, Vol. 283:1007-1015).

>From the Abstract:

Context: Several reports from small clinical trials have suggested that estrogen replacement therapy may be useful for the treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD) in women. Objective: To determine whether estrogen replacement therapy affects global, cognitive, or functional decline in women with mild to moderate AD. Conclusions: Estrogen replacement therapy for 1 year did not slow disease progression nor did it improve global, cognitive, or functional outcomes in women with mild to moderate AD. The study does not support the role of estrogen for the treatment of this disease. The potential role of estrogen in the prevention of AD, however, requires further research.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v283n8/full/joc91949.html

B. "Estrogen and Alzheimer Disease: Plausible Theory, Negative Clinical Trial," by Bennett A. Shaywitz and Sally E. Shaywitz. (_Journal of the American Medical Association_, Feb. 23, 2000, Vol. 283:1055-1056). Note: This is a _JAMA_ editorial.

http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v283n8/full/jed00005.html

C. "Decisions to Withdraw Life-Sustaining Treatment: A Moral Algorithm," by Edmund D. Pellegrino (_Journal of the American Medical Association_, Feb. 23, 2000, Vol. 283:1065-1067). Note: This is a _JAMA_ "Controversy."

http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v283n8/full/jcv90001.html
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4. _SCIENCE_ ARTICLE: "New Clue to Age Control in Yeast," by Evelyn Strauss (_Science_ Volume 287, Number 5456; Issue of 18 Feb 2000, p. 1181- 1182). Note: Your organization may have access to full text of this article. Check your organization library to find out, or just click on "Full Text of this Article."

http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/summary/287/5456/1181a
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5. _NATURE_ LETTER: "Transcriptional silencing and longevity protein Sir2 is an NAD-dependent histone deacetylase," by Shin-Ichiro Imai, Christopher M. Armstrong, Matt Kaeberlein, and Leonard Guarente (_Nature_ Feb. 17, 2000, Vol. 403, p. 795-800.) Note: _Nature_ requires free registration before providing access to tables of contents and abstracts of articles. Note: Your organization may have access to full text of this article. Check your organization library to find out, or just click on "full text" or "pdf".

http://www.nature.com/cgi-taf/DynaPage.taf?file=/nature/journal/v403/n6771/abs/403795a0_fs.html
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6. _NEJM_ ARTICLES AND EDITORIAL:

A. "Clinical Problems with the Performance of Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide in the Netherlands," by Johanna H. Groenewoud, Agnes van der Heide, Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Dick L. Willems, Paul J. van der Maas, and Gerrit van der Wal (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 342, No. 8, Feb. 24, 2000, p. 551-556). Note: Full text of this article is available to subscribers to _NEJM_. For abstract and/or article ordering information see:

http://www.nejm.org/content/2000/0342/0008/0551.asp

B. "Physicians' Experiences with the Oregon Death with Dignity Act," by Linda Ganzini, Heidi D. Nelson, Terri A. Schmidt, Dale F. Kraemer, Molly A. Delorit, and Melinda A. Lee (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 342, No. 8, Feb. 24, 2000, p. 557-563). Note: Full text of this article is available to subscribers to _NEJM_. For abstract and/or article ordering information see:

http://www.nejm.org/content/2000/0342/0008/0557.asp

C. "Legalized Physician-Assisted Suicide in Oregon -- The Second Year," by Amy D. Sullivan, Katrina Hedberg, and David W. Fleming (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 342, No. 8, Feb. 24, 2000, p. 598-604). Note: Full text of this article is available to subscribers to _NEJM_. For abstract and/or article ordering information see:

http://www.nejm.org/content/2000/0342/0008/0598.asp

D. "Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia in Practice," by Sherwin B. Nuland (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 342, No. 8, Feb. 24, 2000). Note: This is a _NEJM_ editorial and is freely available in electronic full text.

http://www.nejm.org/content/2000/0342/0008/0583.asp
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7. USDA ERS REPORT: "Changes in the Older Population and Implications for Rural Areas," by Carolyn C. Rogers (U.S. Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service Rural Development Research Report No. 90 [RRDR-90], December 1999, .pdf format, 33p.). Note: The report can be downloaded in its entirety or chapter by chapter.

>From the Abstract:

The older population in the United States has been growing and aging rapidly, with the fastest growing segment being the oldest old--those age 85 and older. This segment of the older population increased 37 percent between 1980 and 1990, compared with a 17-percent increase in the total population of elderly (60 and above). The oldest old are more likely to be women, to be in poor health, to live alone, and to be poor. This analysis presents data on changes in the age distribution and socioeconomic status of the older population by rural-urban residence and examines the implications for resources, services, and programs in rural areas.

http://www.econ.ag.gov/epubs/pdf/rdrr90/

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III. Working Papers

8. MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE FOR DEMOGRAPHIC RESEARCH (GERMANY): "Why is health treatment for the elderly less expensive than for the rest of the population? Health care rationing in Germany," by Hilke Brockmann (WP 2000-001, January 2000, .pdf format, 27p.).

>From the Abstract:

The consequences of population ageing for the health care system and health care costs may be less severe than is commonly assumed. Hospital discharge data from Germany's largest health insurer (AOK) show that the care of patients during their last year of life is less costly if they die at an advanced age. As a multivariate analysis reveals, oldest old patients receive less costly treatment for the same illness than younger patients. Health care is informally rationed according to the age of the patient. The data also indicate that age-related rationing may be more pronounced in Germany than in the United States.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/Papers/Working/WP-2000-001.pdf
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9. PENSION RESEARCH COUNCIL (WHARTON SCHOOL, UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA): "Developments in Retirement Provision: Global Trends and Lessons from Australia and the US," by Olivia S. Mitchell and John Piggott (PRC WP 2000-2, February 2000, .pdf format, 15p.).

Retirement systems should be conceived of as long-term financial contracts under which workers contributions today are exchanged for benefits paid to the elderly tomorrow. Such contracts are said to be well-managed if the transactions are handled in an affordable, reliable, and efficient manner. Yet all pension systems are forced to operate under a multitude of constraints including participants ability and willingness to save; the availability of assets with which to convert current saving into future retirement benefits; the limitations of imperfect capital markets; political influences imposed by stakeholders; country macroeconomic conditions; and as we are becoming increasingly aware, global business cycles. If pensions are to continue to meet the needs of an aging world,
it is imperative to prepare for emerging challenges as these systems evolve through time. In these remarks we first show how global demographic change is driving pension change throughout the world. Next we describe and compare developments in old-age provision over the last decade in Australia and the United States, and outline the key issues facing retirement systems in both nations. There are many differences between the experiences of the two countries, but as we shall show there are also common themes. Finally we identify key pension reform design issues facing Australia and the US in the upcoming decades.

http://prc.wharton.upenn.edu/prc/2000-2.PDF
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10. FUNDACION DE ESTUDIOS DE ECONOMIA APLICADA (FEDEA, SPAIN):

A. "Vintage Human Capital, Demographic Trends, and Endogenous Growth," by Raouf Boucekkine, David de la Croix, and Omar Licandro (WP 2000-002, January 2000, .pdf format, 32p.).

>From the Abstract:

We study how economic growth is affected by demographics in an overlapping generations model with a realistic survival law. Individuals optimally choose the dates at which they leave school to enter the labor market and at which they retire. Endogenous growth arises thanks to the accumulation of generation-specific human capital. Favorable shifts in the survival probabilities always induce longer schooling and later retirement but have an ambiguous effect on growth. The relationship between the growth of population and per-capita growth is hump-shaped. Increases in longevity can be responsible for a switch from a no-growth regime to a sustained growth regime and for a positive relationship between fertility and growth to vanish.

ftp://ftp.fedea.es/pub/Papers/2000/dt2000-02.pdf

B. "Job Loss and Unemployment Duration for Older Workers in Spain," by Almudena Blanco and Sara de la Rica (Studies on the Economy of Spain EEE-56, November 1999, .pdf format, 42p.). Note: The quality of the electronic full text of this paper is poor at this time. If you are interested in a print copy of this working paper, try contacting:

infpub@fedea.es

Telephone and mail information can be found at:

http://www.fedea.es/hojas/egindex.html

>From the Abstract:

The aim of this study is to analyze how unemployment affects older workers, which is a demographic group of increasing importance in the Spanish population structure. The specific empirical issues we try to answer are (i) which are the main determinants of job loss for these workers, relatively to prime age workers, and (ii) which are the main determinants for these job losers to find a job again. We use a longitudinal sample of the Spanish Labour Force Survey (1992:1 - 1997:2) and the findings suggest that whereas individual characteristics for older workers, such as qualification are important determinants for prime age workers in order not to suffer a job loss, the impact of these characteristics for older workers is very small, and dominated by other issues, such as rising costs or demand conditions. With respect to unemployment duration, we find that technical education helps prime age workers to find a job. However, for older workers education seems to have a negative impact in order to leave unemployment.

ftp://ftp.fedea.es/pub/eee/eee56.pdf

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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability)

11. Experimental Aging Research (Vol. 26, No. 2, April 2000). Note: This journal is available in electronic full text in the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database. Check your library for the availability of the database and of this issue.

http://www.catchword.co.uk/titles/tandf/0361073X/contp1-1.htm

Note: Click on page numbers for links to electronic full text for those organizations that have a subscription to the print issue (.pdf and RealPage formats). Click on "RealPage" or ".PDF" to see if you have access to full text.
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12. Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences (A) (Vol. 55, No. 2, February 2000). Note: This journal is available in electronic full text in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of the database and of this issue. Search under Journals of Gerontology.

http://www.geron.org/journals/medcontents.html
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13. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences (B) (Vol. 55B, No. 1, January 2000). Note: This journal is available in electronic full text in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of the database and of this issue. Search under Journals of Gerontology.

http://www.geron.org/journals/psycontents.html
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14. CARL Uncover Journal Tables of Contents. Follow the instructions below to access tables of contents. CARL Uncover provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://uncweb.carl.org:80/

B. click on "Search Uncover"
C. click on "Search Uncover Now"
D. Type the Journal Name in the search box and click the radio button "Journal Title Browse"
E. click on the journal name
F. click on "journal issues"
G. click on the issues identified below

The American Journal of Sociology (Vol. 105, No. 4, January 2000). Note: This journal is available in electronic full text in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of the database and of this issue.

The International Journal of Aging and Human Development (Vol. 49, No. 4, 1999).

Journal of the American Geriatric Society (Vol. 48, No. 2, February 2000).

Journal of Marriage and the Family (Vol. 62, No. 1, February 2000).

Research on Aging (Vol. 22, No. 2, March 2000). Note: This journal is available in electronic full text in the EBSCO Host Academic Search Elite Database and the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of these databases and of this issue.

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V. Conferences and Workshops

15. CALIFORNIA GERIATRIC EDUCATION CENTER AT UCLA: Interdisciplinary Faculty Development Program: Cultural Diversity in Health and Aging. June 20-24, 2000.

The Health and Aging Faculty Development Program provides visiting faculty the opportunity to examine cultural diversity among aging populations. It offers participants with state-of-the-art, interdisciplinary perspectives in social and health-related aspects of aging. Participants in the program can develop aging-related content for the classroom. The program is based on findings from national surveys of curricular needs in health and aging. Its goal is to enhance the interest and resources of faculty to improve existing curriculum and expand health and aging education at their home institutions. The California Geriatric Education Center (CGEC), an interdisciplinary, multi-campus center, promotes the continued training of educators in health and aging. For more information see:

http://www.geronet.ucla.edu/faculty_development/Cultural_Diversity_in_Health&Aging.htm
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16. RAND SUMMER INSTITUTE: DEMOGRAPHY, ECONOMICS, AND EPIDEMIOLOGY OF AGING: A conference to be held July 14-16, 2000 at the Rand Corporation, Santa Monica CA. For more information see:

http://www.rand.org/centers/aging/rsi/index.html

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VI. Websites of Interest

17. SSA PENSION PAPERS AND BULLETIN ARTICLES: The Social Security Administration has recently opened a website that is a compilation of _Social Security Bulletin_ articles related to pension issues. At present, the three most recent articles: "Characteristics of Individuals with Integrated Pensions" (Vol. 62, No. 3, 1999); "Pension Integration and Social Security Reform" (Vol. 61, No. 3, 1998); and "The Retirement Prospects of the Baby Boom Generation" (Vol. 61, No. 1, 1998), are available in electronic full text (.pdf format). Citations and abstracts are available for seven other relevant articles going back to 1988.

http://www.ssa.gov/policy/policyareas/pensions/PaperArt.html


Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu