Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #218--December 26, 2003

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CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar.html

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I. Data:

1. NCHS DATA UPDATE: NCHS has put out an update for the 2002 National Health Interview Survey Person File Layout. "The document containing the layout of the 2002 NHIS person file (personsx.pdf) was modified today in order to correct the file locations (column numbers) for the LAHCC.. and LAHCA.. variables (FHS.270 and FHS.290). No updates were required to any data files or to any sample SAS, SPSS, or Stata programs."

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm

Follow the link to "2002 NHIS Data Release".
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2. AHRQ MEPS:

A. "MEPS HC-059B: 2001 Dental Visits," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, December 2003, is in ASCII and SAS transport format, with documentation (.pdf format), and SAS and SPSS programming statements). Note: "This file consists of 2001 data obtained in the 2001 portion of round 3 and rounds 4 and 5 for Panel 5, as well as rounds 1, 2, and the 2001 portion of round 3 for Panel 6 of the survey (i.e., the rounds for the MEPS panels covering calendar year 2001), and contains variables pertaining to household reported dental visits. The file includes the date of the dental event, type of provider seen, if the visit was due to an accident, reason for the dental event, and whether or not medicines were prescribed."

http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=141

B. "MEPS HC-059C: 2001 Other Medical Expenses," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, December 2003, is in ASCII and SAS transport format, with documentation (.pdf format), and SAS and SPSS programming statements). Note: "This public use file provides information on the purchase of and expenditures for medical equipment, supplies, glasses and other medical items for a nationally representative sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States and can be used to make estimates of the utilization and expenditures associated with medical items during the 2001 calendar year."

http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=142

C. "MEPS HC-059H: 2001 Home Health File," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, December 2003, is in ASCII and SAS transport format, with documentation (.pdf format), and SAS and SPSS programming statements). Note: "This public use file provides information on home health care for a nationally representative sample of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States and can be used to make estimates of the utilization and expenditures associated with home health care during the 2001 calendar year."

http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=143

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II. Reports and articles:

3. AHRQ REPORTS:

A. "The National Healthcare Quality Report," (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, December 2003, .pdf and Word format). Note: "The report includes a broad set of performance measures that can serve as baseline views of the quality of health care. The report presents data on the quality of services for seven clinical conditions, including cancer, diabetes, end-stage renal disease, heart disease, HIV and AIDS, mental health, and respiratory disease. It also includes data on maternal and child health, nursing home and home health care, and patient safety."

B. "The National Healthcare Disparities Report," (Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, December 2003, .pdf, Word, and WordPerfect formats, 196p.). Note: "The National Healthcare Disparities Report, developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, represents the first national comprehensive effort to measure differences in access and use of health care services by various populations. The report includes a broad set of performance measures that can serve as baseline views of differences in the use of services."

http://www.qualitytools.ahrq.gov/

Follow the link to each title to access the report.

Press release:

http://www.ahcpr.gov/news/press/pr2003/nhqrdrpr.htm
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4. _PNAS_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT:

A. "Imaging linear birefringence and dichroism in cerebral amyloid pathologies," by Lee-Way Jin, Kacey A. Claborn, Miki Kurimoto, Morten A. Geday, Izumi Maezawa, Faranak Sohraby, Marcus Estrada, Werner Kaminksy, and Bart Kahr (_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_, Vol. 100, No. 26, December 23, 2003, .pdf and HTML format, p. 15294-15298).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/100/26/15294

B. "Myoglobin forms amyloid fibrils by association of unfolded polypeptide segments," by Marcus Fndrich, Vincent Forge, Katrin Buder, Marlis Kittler, Christopher M. Dobson, and Stephan Diekmann (_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_, Vol. 100, No. 26, December 23, 2003, .pdf and HTML format, p. 15463-15468).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/100/26/15463

C. "Increased phosphorylation of the neuronal L-type Ca2+ channel Cav1.2 during aging," by Monika A. Davare and Johannes W. Hell (_Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences_, Vol. 100, No. 26, December 23, 2003, .pdf and HTML format, p. 16018-16023).

http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/100/26/16018
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5. _LANCET NEUROLOGY_ SUMMARY ABSTRACT: Note: _Lancet Neurology_ requires free registration before providing any content. "Dementia with Lewy bodies," by Ian McKeith, Jacobo Mintzer, Dag Aarsland, David Burn, Helen Chiu, Jiska Cohen-Mansfield, Dennis Dickson, Bruno Dubois, John E. Duda, Howard Feldman, Serge Gauthier, Glenda Halliday, Brian Lawlor, Carol Lippa, Oscar L. Lopez, Joo Carlos Machado, John O'Brien, Jeremy Playfer, and Wayne Reid (_Lancet Neurology_, Vol. 3, No. 1, January 2004, .pdf and HTML format).

http://neurology.thelancet.com/journal/vol3/iss1/abs/lneu.3.1.review_and_opinion.28044.1
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6. _MEDSCAPE_ ARTICLES: Note: Medscape requires free registration before providing articles.

A. "MEDLINE Abstracts: Family Caregivers in Palliative Care," (_Medscape Nurses_, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2003, via Medscape).

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/465353

B. "Breast Cancer Treatment for the Elderly: An Interview with Hyman Muss, MD," by Eric Sabo (_26th Annual San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium_, 2003, via Medscape).

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/465770

C. "Are Statins Indicated for the Primary Prevention of CAD in Octogenarians? Antagonist Viewpoint," by JoAnne Micale Foody and Harlan M. Krumholz (_American Journal of Geriatric Cardiology_, Vol. 12, No. 6, 2003, p. 357-360, via Medscape).

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/464941
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7. CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH AT BOSTON COLLEGE ISSUES IN BRIEF: "Can Faster Growth Save Social Security?" by Rudolph G. Penner (CRR IB #15, December 2003, .pdf format, 8p.).

From the Introduction:

Numerous commissions, individual researchers, and the Trustees of the Social Security system agree that the current Social Security system is not sustainable. The 2003 Trustees report forecasts that the programs two trust funds (Old Age and Survivors Insurance and Disability Insurance) will be empty in 2042. After 2042, Social Security taxes would only cover about 70 percent of projected benefit costs. Even before the trust funds are exhausted, the combination of rapidly growing Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid spending is likely to create intolerable budget pressures that will force major changes in policy.

The problem lies in demography. The economic burden imposed by these pay-as-you-go programs depends on the number of beneficiaries and the level of benefits that they have been promised. The economic resources available to the programs depend on the number of taxpayers and their ability and willingness to pay taxes. The population of elderly beneficiaries will soar in the future because of increased life expectancy and the retirement of baby boomers the first boomers will apply for Social Security pensions in 2008. Meanwhile, the population of workers paying payroll taxes will stagnate because of low birth rates experienced since the early 1960s.

Although there is a broad consensus that the Social Security system is in trouble, a few dissenters argue that the Trustees are too pessimistic about future economic growth. The dissenters believe that a more realistic growth assumption would allow the trust funds to remain financially sound far longer than now expected. This brief will examine the implications of more rapid economic growth for Social Security and the federal budget as a whole, including a discussion of both the direct and indirect effects of growth.

http://www.bc.edu/centers/crr/issues/ib_15.pdf
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8. AARP _PRIME TIME RADIO_: The following AARP _Prime Time Radio_ show, covering Nov. 18, - Dec. 16, 2003, is now available (RealPlayer plug-in or helper application required, audio transcripts run between 24 and 30 minutes).

Nov. 18, 2003: Menopausal Detective
Nov. 18, 2003: Bill Cosby Frightened!
Nov. 25, 2003: Friendship and Connections
Dec. 2, 2003: Makeovers Gone Wild?
Dec. 9, 2003: Halfway to Everywhere: A Portrait of Americas First-Tier Suburbs

http://www.aarp.org/leisure/radio/pt/

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III. Working Papers:

9. NBER:

A. "What You Don't Know Can't Help You: Pension Knowledge and Retirement Decision Making," by Sewin Chan and Ann Huff Stevens (National Bureau of Economic Research w10185, December 2003, .pdf format, 32p.).

Abstract:

This paper provides an answer to an important empirical puzzle in the retirement literature: while most people know little about their own pension plans, retirement behavior is strongly affected by pension incentives. We combine administrative and self-reported pension data to measure the retirement response to actual and perceived financial incentives. We find that well-informed individuals are five times more responsive to pension incentives than the average individual when knowledge is ignored. We further find that the ill-informed individuals do respond to their own misperception of the incentives, rather than being unresponsive to any incentives.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10185

Click on "PDF" or submit your email address for full text.

B. "The Size and Composition of Wealth Holdings in the United States, Italy, and the Netherlands," by Arie Kapteyn and Constantijn Panis (National Bureau of Economic Research w10182, December 2003, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

This paper analyzes retirement saving and portfolio choice in the United States, Italy, and the Netherlands. While these countries enjoy roughly the same standard of living, they vary widely in their institutional organization of retirement income provisions. Building on extensions of the life cycle model, we derive hypotheses on the implications of institutional differences for wealth accumulation and portfolio composition. Examples of implications are that the ratio of net worth and gross wealth should be highest in Italy, that Dutch households should hold the lowest wealth levels at retirement and that the ownership of risky assets should be highest in the U.S. We investigate these and other hypotheses at both the macro and micro level and find that the data are generally consistent with the hypotheses.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W10182
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10. CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH AT BOSTON COLLEGE: "Simulating the Distributional Consequences of Personal Accounts: Sensitivity to Annuitization Options," by Cori E. Uccello, Melissa M. Favreault, Karen E. Smith, and Lawrence H. Thompson (WP #2003-17, December 2003, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

Recent Social Security reform efforts focus predominantly on the establishment of personal retirement accounts either to supplement or partially replace the current Social Security program. An important issue related to these personal accounts is whether they will redistribute income and how any redistribution compares to that under the current Social Security system. The answer depends in part on how personal accounts are disbursed upon retirement. In particular, it depends on how mandatory annuitization would impact different groups, especially those with shorter life spans, and whether certain annuity features would offset the drawbacks associated with forcing even those with short life expectancies to annuitize. This paper presents a first step toward answering these questions. It first compares the distributional impacts of personal accounts to the current system. It then examines how different strategies for annuitizing personal account balances might change these distributional impacts. Of particular interest is whether certain annuity features can benefit workers with shorter life spans.

http://www.bc.edu/centers/crr/papers/wp_2003-17.pdf
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11. MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE FOR DEMOGRAPHIC RESEARCH [ROSTOCK, GERMANY]:

A. "Age Correspondence for Different Mortality Regimes with and without the Change Point," by Maxim S. Finkelstein (WP-2003-039, December 2003, .pdf format, 12p.).

Abstract:

The mortality rates are steadily declining with time. The remaining lifetime for e.g. 65 years old person even 20-30 years ago was substantially smaller than nowadays. Therefore, the age correspondence problem for populations in different mortality regimes is of interest. A simple solution, based on the equality of accumulated mortality rates (or, equivalently, on the equality of probabilities of survival) is considered. Furthermore, the mortality regime with a change point is defined and the procedure of age re-calculation after the change point is suggested. Two age re-calculation models (and their combination) are discussed: the first one accounts for wear accumulation in the process of aging and the other is characterized by a kind of memoryless property.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2003-039.pdf

B. "Lifesaving increases Life Expectancy," by Maxim S. Finkelstein (WP-2003-040, December 2003, .pdf format, 9p.).

Abstract:

The notion of repeated minimal repair is analyzed and applied to modeling the lifesaving procedure of organisms. Under certain assumptions the equivalence between demographic lifesaving model and reliability shock model is proved. Both of these models are based on the non-homogeneous Poisson processes of underlying potentially harmful events. The lifesaving ratio for homogeneous and heterogeneous populations is defined. Some generalizations are discussed. Several simple examples are considered.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2003-040.pdf

C. "Modeling Failure (Mortality) Rate with a Change Point," by Maxim S. Finkelstein (WP-2003-041, December 2003, .pdf format, 9p.).

Abstract:

Simple models for the failure (mortality) rate change point are considered. The relationship with the mean residual lifetime function change point problem is discussed. It is shown that when the change point is random, the observed failure (mortality) rate can be obtained via a specific mixture of lifetime distributions. The shape of the observed failure (mortality) rate is analyzed and the corresponding simple but meaningful example is considered.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2003-041.pdf

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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

12. Aging and Mental Health (Vol. 8, No. 1, January 2004).

http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=243AGLP6MKMH

13. American Journal of Sociology (Vol. 109, No. 3, November 2003). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/contents?AJS+v109n3

14. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics (Vol. 38, No. 2, March/April 2004).

http://www.elsevier.com/locate/archger

Follow link to "Tables of Contents and Abstracts". Go to link for "Vol. 38, No. 2".

15. Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences (Vol. 58, No. 12, December 2003). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://biomed.gerontologyjournals.org/content/vol58/issue12/index.shtml
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16. INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "browse by publication"
C. Click the "fax/ariel" radio button, type the Journal Name in the "by words in the title" search box and click "search".
D. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Health and Social Work (Vol. 28, No. 4, 2003). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

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17. AMEDEO MEDICAL LITERATURE: Note: "AMEDEO has been created to serve the needs of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, other members of the health professions, and patients and their friends. They can easily access timely, relevant information within their respective fields... All AMEDEO services are free of charge. This policy was made possible thanks to generous unrestricted educational grants provided by AMGEN, Berlex, Eisai, Glaxo Wellcome, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Schering AG."

A. Osteoporosis: Literature for the week of December 23, 2003:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ost.htm

B. Alzheimer's Disease: Literature for the week of December 23, 2003:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ad.htm

C. Parkinson's Disease: Literature for the week of December 23, 2003:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/pd.htm

D. Prostate Cancer: Literature for the week of December 23, 2003:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/prc.htm

AMADEO Literature Guide:

http://www.amedeo.com/index.htm

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V. Funding Opportunities:

18. NIH NOTICES, REQUEST FOR APPLICATION:

A. "Workshop on Technology for Adaptive Aging: A Pre-publication Report to Assist Applicants for RFA AG-04-007," (US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, NOT-AG-04-001, December 16, 2003).

http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-AG-04-001.html

B. "Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Resource Infrastructure Enhancement Award - Addendum to PAR-03-177," (US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with other agencies, NOT-AI-04-012, December 16, 2003).

http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/notice-files/NOT-AI-04-012.html

C. "Nathan Shock Centers of Excellence in Basic Biology of Aging," (US National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging, RFA-AG-04-010, December 23, 2003).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-04-010.html
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VI. Legislation Information Updates:

19. US SENATE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON AGING HEARING PUBLICATIONS:

A. "Direct-to-Consumer Advertising of Prescription Drugs: What are the Consequences?" a hearing held July 22, 2003 (Senate Hearing Publication 108-183, .pdf and ASCII text format, 143p.).

B. "Social Security: Whose Trust will be Broken?" a hearing held July 29, 2003 (Senate Hearing Publication 108-202, .pdf and ASCII text format, 140p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/senate/senate22sh108.html
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20. US SENATE HEALTH, EDUCATION, LABOR, AND PENSIONS COMMITTEE HEARING PUBLICATION: "Elder Justice and Protection: Stopping the Abuse, on Examining the Serious Problem of Elder Abuse, Determining Ways of Prevention and Ensuring That Crimes Against the Elderly are Reported and Those Responsible are Prosecuted," a hearing held August 20, 2003 (Senate Hearing Publication 108-210, .pdf and ASCII text format, 41p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/senate/senate15sh108.html

Thanks,

Charlie

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Charlie Fiss
Information Manager
Center for Demography and Ecology and
Center for Demography of Health and Aging
Rm. 4470A Social Science Bldg
1180 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1393
Phone: (608) 265-9240
Fax: (608) 262-8400
Email: fiss@ssc.wisc.edu

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