Current Awareness in Aging Research (CAAR) Report #217--December 18, 2003

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CAAR (Current Awareness in Aging Research) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography of Health and Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.ssc.wisc.edu/cdha/caar.html

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I. Data:

1. CENSUS BUREAU: "Geographic Mobility: March 2001 to March 2002: Detailed Tables," (US Census Bureau, December 2003, Microsoft Excel, .pdf, and comma separated value [.csv] format). 34 sets of tables are included in this release.

http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/migrate/cps2002.html
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2. AHRQ MEPS:

A. "MEPS HC-058: MEPS Panel 4 Longitudinal Weight File," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, December 2003, data on the CD is in ASCII and SAS transport format, with documentation, and SAS programming statements). Note: "The file contains a weight variable (LONGWTP4) that, when applied to the persons who participated in both 1999 and 2000, will enable the user to make national estimates of person-level changes in selected variables (e.g., health insurance, health status, utilization and expenditures). In addition, LONGWTP4 can be used to develop cross-sectional type estimates for the civilian non-institutionalized population in each year based on only the Panel 4 sample. To obtain analytic variables, the records on this file must be linked to the 1999 and 2000 MEPS public use data files using the sample person identifier (DUPERSID)."

http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=139

B. "MEPS HC-036: MEPS 1996-2001 Pooled Estimation Linkage File," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, December 2003, data on the CD is in ASCII and SAS transport format, with documentation, and SAS programming statements). Note: "[T]his person-level file contains 1996-2001 combined variance stratum and PSU variables, along with the standard MEPS person ID variables for linking with the 1996-2001 MEPS full year person-level public use files. There is one record for each of the 97,976 persons who are on the MEPS FY 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000 or 2001 public use files."

http://www.meps.ahrq.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=86
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3. NCHS: "2002 National Health Interview Survey," (US National Center for Health Statistics, December 2003, data files in ASCII format, SAS, SPSS, and Stata input statements, and documentation files in .pdf format). Note: Data and documentation files are available via FTP download from NCHS.

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nhis.htm#2002%20NHIS

Follow link to "2002 NHIS Data Release".

For more details about the data, documentation, and input statements go to:

ftp://ftp.cdc.gov/pub/Health_Statistics/NCHS/Program_Code/NHIS/2002/readme.txt

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II. Reports and articles:

4. GAO CORRESPONDENCE: "Private Pensions: Timely and Accurate Information is Needed to Identify and Track Frozen Defined Benefit Plans," (US General Accounting Office, GAO-04-200R, December 2003, .pdf format, 10p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d04200r.pdf

Note: These are temporary addresses. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
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5. CENSUS BUREAU REPORT: "2002 Service Annual Survey: Health Care and Social Assistance Services," (Census Bureau, December 2003, .pdf format, 30p.).

http://www.census.gov/svsd/www/sas62.html
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6. WHO REPORT: "World Health Report 2003," (World Health Organization, December 2003, .pdf and HTML format).

http://www.who.int/whr/2003/en/
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7. DHHS OIG REPORT: "Trends in the Assignment of Resource Utilization Groups," (US Department of Health and Human Resources, Office of the Inspector General, OEI-01-03-00180, November 2003, .pdf format, p. 18).

Abstract:

In 1998 Medicare began to reimburse skilled nursing facilities using a prospective payment system. In order to determine reimbursement, nursing homes code Medicare residents into 1 of 44 resource utilization groups (RUGs). In 1999, the Balanced Budget Reform Act included a 4 percent across-the-board increase in payments to skilled nursing facilities for fiscal years 2001 and 2002 and a temporary 20 percent increase to 15 RUGs for resident conditions considered medically complex. In the fall of 2000, Congress further adjusted the payment rates under the Benefits Improvement and Protection Act, which also mandated that the Office of Inspector General assess whether payment incentives exist for the delivery of inadequate care. Based on OIG analysis of data from January 1999 to December 2002, minimal shifts occurred in the assignment of resource utilization groups that correspond to legislative payment changes to skilled nursing facilities during this period. As of October 1, 2002, all temporary payment adjustments ended, and any payment incentives that may have existed concluded at that time.

http://oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-01-03-00180.pdf
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8. CMMS COVERAGE DECISION MEMORANDUM:

A. "Decision Memo for Autologous Blood-Derived Products for Chronic Non-Healing Wounds (CAG-00190N)," (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, December 15, 2003).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/mcd/viewdecisionmemo.asp?id=95

B. "Decision Memo for Electrostimulation for Wounds (CAG-00068R)," (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, December 17, 2003).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/mcd/viewdecisionmemo.asp?id=28
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9. _SCIENCE MAGAZINE_ NEWS FOCUS ARTICLE: "Age Bar Forces Europe's Senior Researchers to Head West," by Giselle Weiss (_Science_, Vol. 302, No. 5652, December 12, 2003, .pdf and HTML format, p. 1885-1886).

http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/summary/302/5652/1885
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10. AUSTRALIAN DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND AGEING PRESS RELEASE:

A. "$32 million extra for Home and Community Care in NSW," (December 15, 2003).

http://www.health.gov.au/mediarel/yr2003/jb/jb03042.htm

B. "Australian Government delivers more support to age at home," (December 16, 2003).

http://www.health.gov.au/mediarel/yr2003/jb/jb03043.htm
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11. _NEJM_ ARTICLE ABSTRACT: "The Long-Term Effect of Doxazosin, Finasteride, and Combination Therapy on the Clinical Progression of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia," by John D. McConnell, Claus G. Roehrborn, Oliver M. Bautista, Gerald L. Andriole, Jr., Christopher M. Dixon, John W. Kusek, Herbert Lepor, Kevin T. McVary, Leroy M. Nyberg, Jr., Harry S. Clarke, E. David Crawford, Ananias Diokno, John P. Foley,Harris E. Foster, Stephen C. Jacobs, Steven A. Kaplan, Karl J. Kreder, Michael M. Lieber, M. Scott Lucia, Gary J. Miller, Mani Menon, Douglas F. Milam, Joe W. Ramsdell, Noah S. Schenkman, Kevin M. Slawin, and Joseph A. Smith, M.D., for the Medical Therapy of Prostatic Symptoms (MTOPS) Research Group (_New England Journal of Medicine_, Vol. 349, No. 25, December 18, 2003, .pdf and HMTL format, p. 2387-2398).

http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/349/25/2387
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12. _BMJ_ PRIMARY CARE: "Health of young and elderly informal carers: analysis of UK census data," by Tim Doran, Frances Drever, and Margaret Whitehead (_British Medical Journal_, Vol. 327, No. 1369, December 13, 2003, .pdf and HTML format, p. 1388).

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/327/7428/1388
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13. _JAMA_ REVIEWS, ARTICLE ABSTRACT:

A. "Intra-articular Hyaluronic Acid in Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis: A Meta-analysis," by Grace H. Lo, Michael LaValley, Timothy McAlindon, and David T. Felson (_Journal of American Medical Association_, Vol. 290, No. 23, December 17, 2003, .pdf and HTML format, p. 3115-3121).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/290/23/3115

B. "Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Young Adulthood and the Development of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors," by Mercedes R. Carnethon, Samuel S. Gidding, Rodrigo Nehgme, Stephen Sidney, David R. Jacobs, Jr, and Kiang Liu (_Journal of American Medical Association_, Vol. 290, No. 23, December 17, 2003, .pdf and HTML format, p. 3092-3100).

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/290/23/3092
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14. _MEDSCAPE_ ARTICLE: Note: Medscape requires free registration before providing articles.

A. "Thoughts on Individualizing Hormone Replacement Therapy Based on the Postmenopausal Health Disparities Study Data," by Judith S. Gavaler (Journal of Women's Health, Vol. 12, No. 8, 2003, p. 757-768, via Medscape).

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/463053

B. "Are Nursing Homes Appropriate for Older Adults with Severe Mental Illness? Conflicting Consumer and Clinician Views and Implications for the Olmstead Decision," by Stephen J. Bartels, Keith M. Miles, Aricca R. Dums, and Kristin J. Levine (Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, Vol. Vol. 51, No. 11, 2003, p. 1571-1579, via Medscape).

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/463911
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15. URBAN INSTITUTE REPORT: "Changing the Age of Medicare Eligibility: Implications for Older Adults, Employers, and the Government," by Richard W. Johnson (Urban Institute, December 2003, .pdf and HTML format, 48p.).

Abstract:

Growing concerns about health insurance coverage for near elderly adults have recently prompted calls to lower the age of Medicare eligibility, while increases in the normal retirement age for Social Security and concerns about Medicare's financial health, particularly as the population ages, have led others to suggest delaying it. This report reviews the available evidence on how changes to the age of Medicare eligibility might affect government costs and rates of health insurance coverage and employment for near elderly adults (ages 55 to 64) and young elderly adults (ages 65 to 66).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=410902
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16. CENTER FOR RETIREMENT RESEARCH AT BOSTON COLLEGE ISSUE BRIEF: "How Do Cash Balance Plans Affect the Pension Landscape?" by Kevin E. Cahill and Mauricio Soto (Center for Retirement Research Issue in Brief #14, December 2003, .pdf format, 8p.).

>From the Introduction:

"The dominant story in the pension world for much of the past decade has been the shift in coverage from defined benefit plans to 401(k)s and other defined contribution plans. The percentage of households covered solely by a defined benefit plan dropped by nearly half between 1992 and 2001, while those covered solely by a defined contribution plan increased nearly 50 percent. Still, 40 percent of households covered by a pension have some form of defined benefit plan. At the same time, a notable shift has also occurred within defined benefit pensions away from traditional plans and towards hybrid plans, such as cash balance plans. The changing face of defined benefit plans is the focus of this issue in brief. This brief explains how cash balance pension plans work, why firms have adopted them, and what their impact will be on employees and employers."

http://www.bc.edu/centers/crr/issues/ib_14.pdf
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17. KAISER FAMILY FOUNDATION WEBCAST: "Medicare Prescription Drugs and Low-income Beneficiaries," by Alliance for Health Reform (Kaiser Family Foundation, December 15, 2003, RealPlayer and Windows Media Player format, running time 96 minutes).

http://www.kaisernetwork.org/health_cast/hcast_index.cfm?create=high_real&linkid=1&display=detail&hc=1042
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18. ILCUSA REPORT: "ILC Policy Report," (International Longevity Center, USA, December 2003, .pdf format, 6p.). The ILC Policy Report is "a monthly compilation of longevity news and trends in the U.S. and abroad."

http://www.ilcusa.org/_lib/pdf/ilc200312.pdf
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19. _FORBES MAGAZINE_ ARTICLE: "Bull's Eye," by Zina Moukheiber (_Forbes_, December 22, 2003).

http://www.forbes.com/forbes/2003/1222/232.html
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20. _NEWSWEEK_ ARTICLE: "The Drug Bill's Hidden Costs," by Jane Bryant Quinn (_Newsweek_, December 22, 2003).

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/3704899/
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21. _US NEWS AND WORLD REPORTS_ ARTICLE: "Joint decisions," by Katherine Hobson (_US News & World Reports_, December 22, 2003).

http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/031222/health/22joints.htm

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III. Working Papers:

22. NEW ZEALAND TREASURY:

A. "Population Ageing in New Zealand: The Impact on Living Standards and the Optimal Rate of Saving with a Flexible Real Exchange Rate," by Ross Guest, Grant Scobie and John Bryant (New Zealand Treasury Working Paper 03/34, December 2003, .pdf format, 26p.)

Abstract:

The purpose of this paper is to extend the simulation analysis of population ageing in Guest, Bryant and Scobie (2003). In that paper a single-good Ramsey-Solow model was calibrated for New Zealand and used to simulate the impact of population ageing on optimal national saving and average living standards over the next 100 years. There are several innovations in the present paper. One is to allow for tradable and non-tradable goods and thereby to introduce a real exchange rate. Changes in the real exchange rate due to population ageing produce substitution effects between tradable and non-tradable goods, in both consumption and investment. Other innovations in this paper are an outward-looking model of utility, a proportion of rule-of-thumb consumers, and a vintage capital model. The simulations of population ageing are conducted by first deriving a range of demographic projections from alternative assumptions about fertility, mortality and immigration. The resulting series for population and employment by age group are weighted to account for age-specific labour productivity levels and consumption demands. The model is solved by finding optimal paths of investment and consumption from an initial steady state to a new steady state following a demographic shock. The sanguine assessment of the impact of population ageing on living standards and national saving in Guest, Bryant and Scobie (2003) remains intact following the extensions applied to the model in this paper. That is, the cost of ageing is equivalent in its effect on living standards to an annual loss of labour productivity growth of about a quarter of one percent over the next 50 years. The optimal path for national saving implies a rise of up to 2% of GDP over the next decade, relative to that which would have been optimal in the absence of population ageing. In all the cases considered, the optimal level of savings then trends down, so that by 2051 it would be about 2 percentage points of GDP lower than the level that would have been optimal were the population age structure to have remained unchanged.

http://www.treasury.govt.nz/workingpapers/2003/twp03-34.pdf

B. "Household Saving Behaviour in New Zealand: Why do Cohorts Behave Differently?" by Grant M Scobie and John K Gibson (New Zealand Treasury Working Paper 03/32, December 2003, .pdf format, 29p.)

Abstract:

The aim of this paper is to add to the understanding of saving decisions by households. The saving behaviour of households is found to differ depending on the birth cohort of the household head. This paper seeks to explain why this pattern might exist. It is based on an analysis of synthetic cohorts derived from unit record data taken from the Household Economic Survey (HES) for the March years 1984 to 1998. The need to use synthetic cohorts arises as the HES is not a longitudinal panel survey, but rather a time series of independent cross-sectional samples. We use a range of regression models to separate out the effect of age, birth-year cohort and year on saving rates. The typical saving rates for the cohorts born between 1920 and 1939 are found to be significantly lower relative to the younger and older cohorts studied. This pattern of cohort effects is robust to the inclusion of conditioning variables; to the trimming from the sample of households with either negative or very large ratios of savings to consumption, and to different definitions of saving. Some exploratory investigation supports the hypothesis that changes in the economic and policy environment help explain the different saving behaviour of different birth cohorts. Tentative results suggest that more favourable environments are associated with lower rates of lifetime saving.

http://www.treasury.govt.nz/workingpapers/2003/twp03-32.pdf
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23. INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF LABOR (IZA) [UNIVERSITY OF BONN, GERMANY]:

A. "Generational Accounting, Solidarity and Pension Losses," by Coen Teulings and Casper G. de Vries (IZA Discussion Paper DP-961, December 2003, .pdf format, 17p.).

Abstract:

The creeping stock market collapse eroded the wealth of funded pension systems. This led to political tensions between generations due to the fuzzy definition of property rights on the pension funds wealth. We argue that this problem can best be resolved by the introduction of generational accounts. Using modern portfolio and consumption planning theory we show that the younger generations should have the higher equity exposure due to their human capital. Capital losses should be distributed smoothly over lifetime consumption. When stock markets are depressed equity should be bought, savings and consumption should be scaled down equiproportionally, and retirement should be postponed. Portfolio investment restrictions are quite costly.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp961.pdf

B. "Gerontocracy in Motion? European Cross-Country Evidence on the Labor Market Consequences of Population Ageing," by Michael Fertig and Christoph M. Schmidt (IZA Discussion Paper DP-956, December 2003, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

Taking a European cross-country perspective, this paper addresses the most important issues in the nexus of population ageing and labor markets. We start from a descriptive overview of the demographic change currently shaping European societies. The subsequent section intensively discusses the potential consequences of these demographic processes for and interdependencies with the labor market situation in Europe. We place particular emphasis on the issue of non-competitive wage setting. In our empirical application we demonstrate that moderately large birth cohorts seem to experience lower employment rates, but also that education investments might be able to mitigate these consequences, and that the relative economic success of large cohorts might even be disproportionately positive. Finally, in the concluding section we review possible policy options for coping with the consequences of population ageing.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp956.pdf
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24. PENSION RESEARCH COUNCIL, WHARTON SCHOOL [UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA]:

A. "A Symposium on Cash Balance Pensions: Background and Introduction," by Sylvester J. Schieber (PRC WP 2003-21, December 2003, .pdf format, 28p.).

Abstract:

Here we provide an overview to a set of papers that analyze various facets of the shift to cash balance and other hybrid pension forms that has become controversial and widely discussed phenomenon in the evolution of private, employer-sponsored pensions in the United States. These new plans take on the characteristics of defined contribution plans from the perspective of workers but continue to be funded and operated as defined benefit plans from the perspective of plan sponsors. The shift to this new style of plans began in the mid 1980s but then took off and accelerated toward the end of the 1990s. This paper describes the context in which this shift in plan types being offered by employers took place because it helps to explain various features of these plans addressed in the remaining papers and the underlying reasons that employers have adopted the new plans. The latter part of this paper provides a very brief summary of the conclusions drawn from the remaining papers in the set.

http://rider.wharton.upenn.edu/~prc/PRC/WP/WP2003-21b.pdf

B. "Cash Balance Pension Plan Conversions and the New Economy," by Julia Lynn Coronado and Phillip C. Copeland (PRC WP 2003-22, December 2003, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

Many firms that sponsor traditional defined benefit pensions have converted their plans to cash balance plans in the last ten years. Cash balance plans combine features of defined benefit (DB) and defined contribution (DC) plans, and yet their introduction has proven considerably more controversial than has the increasing popularity of DC plans. The goal of this study is to estimate a hierarchy of the influences on the decision of a firm to convert its traditional defined benefit pension plan to a cash balance plan. Our results indicate that cash balance conversions have been undertaken in competitive industries with tight labor markets and can be viewed largely as a response to better compensate a more mobile labor force. Indeed, many firms appear to increase their pension liabilities through such conversions.

http://rider.wharton.upenn.edu/~prc/PRC/WP/WP2003-22.pdf

C. "The Shift to Hybrid Pensions by U.S. Employers: An Empirical Analysis of Actual Plan Conversions," by Sylvester J. Schieber (PRC WP 2003-23, December 2003, .pdf format, 62p.).

Abstract:

For nearly two decades, employers have been restructuring traditional defined benefit pension plans to look and operate more like defined contribution plans from participants perspectives while retaining defined benefit funding characteristics. This shift to cash balance and pension equity plans has become controversial because some participants and outside analysts have concluded the shift to these new plan styles has been primarily motivated by the desire to cut pension costs and reduce benefits. This paper empirically documents the shift from traditional pension forms to these new hybrid forms for a sample of actual plan conversions. The analysis investigates the implications of the plan conversions on plan costs and the levels and distribution of benefits. It finds that some employers did indeed modify their plans to reduce costs but that, on average, cost savings from the shift to hybrid plans have been negligible. The paper documents that some workers will receive smaller benefits under the new plans than they would under the old but shows that most plan sponsors implemented substantial grandfathering or other transition protection to eliminate or limit the effect of the transitions on workers with substantial tenure or age at the time of conversion. The controversial "wear-away" is evaluated against provisions in the prior plans that provided subsidized benefits to early retirees and then reduced them if workers extended their career beyond early retirement eligibility. It finds that wear-away has actually been ameliorated in the shift to hybrid plans although shifted forward in the career in most cases. The paper shows that it is largely the elimination of these early retirement incentives that is at the heart of the shift to hybrid plans. This shift is resulting in new incentives to work beyond early retirement ages and is redistributing benefits more equitably across the total workforce than traditional pensions have done.

http://rider.wharton.upenn.edu/~prc/PRC/WP/WP2003-23.pdf

D. "Pension Plan Options: Preferences, Choices, and the Distribution of Benefits," by Robert L. Clark (PRC WP 2003-24, December 2003, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

The conversion of traditional defined benefit pension plans to cash balance plans has caused considerable controversy. The primary points of contention have been the reduction in future benefits that older workers had expected and whether cash balance plans violate age discrimination laws. This analysis places the trend toward cash balance plans in the large context of a movement away from traditional defined benefit plans. For the past, 30 years employers have been terminating defined benefit plans and adopting defined contributions while the movement toward cash balance plans has been occurring over the past 15 or 20 years. The paper examines why employers and employees now tend to prefer defined contribution and cash balance plans thus placing these trends in an economic framework. A clear distinction is made between starting new plans where no pension previously existed and the conversion of existing plans. Winners and losers in the conversion process are identified. Throughout the analysis of the distributional effects of plan conversions, it is important to consider what might happen if the conversion was not made. Possible outcomes include the termination of the plan with no new plan established, layoffs, or even bankruptcy of the company. Thus, the impact of plan conversions cannot be determined by simply comparing the expected benefits under the old plan conditional on it continuing and the worker remaining with the firm. In summary, the paper concludes that cash balance plans represent a reasonable choice for some firms and some workers while other firms and some workers will prefer traditional defined benefit plans or defined contribution plans. Allowing workers and firms to select from these alternatives will have a higher social benefit than restricting pension choices to a single plan type.

http://rider.wharton.upenn.edu/~prc/PRC/WP/WP2003-24.pdf

E. "Possible Implications of Mandating Choice in Corporate Defined Benefit Plans," by Olivia S. Mitchell and Janemarie Mulvey (PRC WP 2003-25, December 2003, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

Defined benefit (DB) plans have been applauded as the mainstay of the US pension system for many years, but increasingly such plans have been replaced with defined contribution (DC) pensions. One exception to the downward DB spiral has been the development of "hybrid" plans. Technically, these are pensions where the benefit accrual is communicated as a lump sum and not in the form of an annuity as is done with traditional pensions. In the transition to this new plan structure, some employees at some firms have contended that they would have accumulated retirement benefits more quickly under the old DB plan - assuming they remained employed - than under the new hybrid design. In response, some legislators have attempted to force companies transitioning from a traditional DB to a hybrid plan to offer all workers the open-ended choice of remaining in the old DB plan, versus switching to the new hybrid plan. In this paper we explore some of the possible consequences of mandating plan choice in this fashion. We conclude that regulators seeking to mandate pension choice should take into account the potential undesirable outcomes of such a law.

http://rider.wharton.upenn.edu/~prc/PRC/WP/WP2003-25.pdf

F. "Promoting Work at Older Ages: The Role of Hybrid Pension Plans in an Aging Population," by Richard W. Johnson and Eugene Steuerle (PRC WP 2003-26, December 2003, .pdf format, 30p.)

Abstract:

Employers are beginning to search for ways to elicit more labor supply from older adults as the population ages, the ability to work in later life increases, and younger workers become relatively scarce. Many employers are turning to hybrid pension plans, such as cash balance plans and pension equity plans. Whereas traditional defined benefit plans often subsidize workers who retire early and penalize those who remain at work beyond the plan's retirement age, most hybrid plans reward work at older ages. This paper documents the impact of population aging on the labor market and changes over time in work capacity at older ages. It then shows how movement toward hybrid pension plans, among other types of private and public retirement plan reforms and re-designs, can be used to increase work incentives for older adults.

http://rider.wharton.upenn.edu/~prc/PRC/WP/WP2003-26.pdf

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IV. Journal Tables of Contents (check your library for availability):

25. American Journal of Sociology (Vol. 109, No. 2, September 2003). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/contents?AJS+v109n2
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26. AMEDEO MEDICAL LITERATURE: Note: "AMEDEO has been created to serve the needs of healthcare professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, administrators, other members of the health professions, and patients and their friends. They can easily access timely, relevant information within their respective fields... All AMEDEO services are free of charge. This policy was made possible thanks to generous unrestricted educational grants provided by AMGEN, Berlex, Eisai, Glaxo Wellcome, Novartis, Pfizer, Roche, and Schering AG."

A. Osteoporosis: Literature for the week of December 16, 2003:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ost.htm

B. Alzheimer's Disease: Literature for the week of December 16, 2003:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/ad.htm

C. Parkinson's Disease: Literature for the week of December 16, 2003:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/pd.htm

D. Prostate Cancer: Literature for the week of December 16, 2003:

http://www.amedeo.com/medicine/prc.htm

AMADEO Literature Guide:

http://www.amedeo.com/index.htm

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V. Funding Opportunities:

27. NIH:

A. "Oral Health of Special Needs and Older Populations," (US National Institutes on Health, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with other agencies, PA-04-031, December 8, 2003).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-031.html

B. "Diet Composition and Energy Balance," (US National Institutes on Health, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with other agencies, PA-04-033, December 10, 2003).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-033.html

C. "Occupational Health and Safety Research (R01)," (US National Institutes on Health, National Institute on Aging, in conjunction with other agencies, PA-04-038, December 12, 2003).

http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-038.html

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VI. Conferences:

28. PENSION RESEARCH COUNCIL, WHARTON SCHOOL [UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA]:"Reinventing the Retirement Paradigm," a symposium to be held April 26-27, 2004. "This symposium focuses on pension policy and changes needed to support development of pensions in the coming years as we move toward the retirement of the baby boom cohort. Participants will examine recent trends in retirement patterns and draw implications for the future of retirement."

http://rider.wharton.upenn.edu/~prc/04conf.html

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VII. Legislation Information Updates:

29. US HOUSE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT REFORM HEARING PUBLICATION: "Making Health Care More Affordable: Extending Premium Conversion to Federal Retirees," a hearing held July 9, 2003 (US House Serial Publication 108-66, .pdf and ASCII text format, 51p.).

http://www.access.gpo.gov/congress/house/house07ch108.html

Thanks and have a happy and healthy holiday,

Charlie

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Charlie Fiss
Information Manager
Center for Demography and Ecology and
Center for Demography of Health and Aging
Rm. 4470A Social Science Bldg
1180 Observatory Drive
Madison, WI 53706-1393
Phone: (608) 265-9240
Fax: (608) 262-8400
Email: fiss@ssc.wisc.edu

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